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  • Lidia in her teenage years. (Courtesy of Lidia Bastianich)
    To commemorate the National Memorial Day of the Exiles and Foibe (Giorno del ricordo), the Italian celebration for the memory of the victims of the Foibe and the Istrian-Dalmatian exodus. World-famous Italian chef Lidia Bastianich has a story as a refugee that transcends the culinary industry. Lidia was born following the conclusion of World War II, a time when European countries were still settling border disputes. As a young girl, she grew up among three different cultures, each with a profound influence on her. Today, as a professional, Lidia’s childhood experiences and her family ties continue to prove monumental in her continued success.
  • The editorial team celebrates with NIAF President John Viola at our NYC office, which we call La Casa di i-Italy
    A new magazine. Our design isn’t the only thing different about us. After four years of covering New York, we’ve decided to reach out to readers in other American cities: Boston, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Washington DC. And Miami, Philadelphia and Chicago are just around the bend... That means we won't just be talking about the New York area.
  • World-renowned chef Lidia Matticchio Bastianich during i-Italy's interview
    World-famous Italian chef Lidia Bastianich has a story that transcends the culinary industry. Lidia was born following the conclusion of World War II, a time when European countries were still settling border disputes. As a young girl, she grew up among three different cultures, each with a profound influence on her. Today, as a professional, Lidia’s childhood experiences and her family ties continue to prove monumental in her continued success.
  • Dining in & out: Articles & Reviews
    Francine Segan(January 28, 2016)
    Recently I sat down with celebrity chef Lidia Bastianich for a long conversation that was produced and broadcast by i-ItalyTV. We talked about Lidia’s new book Mastering the Art of Italian Cuisine; as well as what it’s like being a TV chef, the genesis of the Eataly concept, cooking for several Popes, including most recently Pope Francis, and, most importantly, how cooking is, and has always been for Lidia, “a family affair.”
  • Op-Eds
    Letizia Airos(January 27, 2016)
    A new issue of our magazine is just about hitting New York City! Why begin with a translation of a medieval poet talking about women and love?
  • Dining in & out: Articles & Reviews
    Mila Tenaglia(November 13, 2015)
    Exclusive nterview with Lidia Bastianich. From the Emmy-winning host of Lidia’s Kitchen, best-selling author, and beloved ambassador for Italian culinary traditions in America comes the ultimate master class: a beautifully produced definitive guide to Italian cooking, coauthored with her daughter, Tanya—covering everything from ingredients to techniques to tools, plus more than 400 delectable recipes
  • IACE annual assembly and award ceremony for the teachers who have brought the largest number of students to sustain the Italian AP exam. The goal was reached one year ahead of schedule: the number of American high school students enrolled in the Italian AP (Advanced Placement) exam this coming Spring has already surpassed 2,500, the minimum that had to be reached by 2016 to keep the test alive. And 60% out of the 2.993 students who signed up to take the exam come from the states of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, where IACE operates.
  • Dining in & out: Articles & Reviews
    Natasha Lardera(December 17, 2014)
    Below you’ll find our fourteen city’s titans of sweetness, dishing out desserts we can’t say no to. From tiramisu to rum baba to millefoglie, each dessert has a hidden link to the regions of Italy, where every family covets its own recipe. Pastry chefs the world over have brought their own twists on old standards to the best restaurants with creativity and passion. Who can refuse a little sweet during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday? Below are our recommendations. If you have a recommendation of your own, send us an email or visit our Facebook page and we’ll publish it online.
  • Italian language and Italian culture make an inseparable pair. Ilaria Costa, executive director of the Italian American Committee on Education (IACE), speaks about this and recounts how difficult it is, in the Tristate area, to promote everything Italian through the language. It’s surprising – but not surprising to us at i-Italy – that many Americans, who do not have a familial relationship with our country, are interested in studying our language. The charm of our culture penetrates America, regardless of the blood ties of its inhabitants.

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