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New Soccer Stadium for Rome? A Decision Approaches

Whether or not Rome is to have a new soccer stadium is approaching a decsion. The present 54-year-old Olympic Stadium, now home to local rival teams AS Roma and to SS Lazio, comes with serious defects, but construction of the proposed new $1.26 billion stadium faces no less serious obstacles.
Multi ethnic kids

Keeping America Great

The morning after the election, when I awakened my twin ten-year old daughters with news of Donald Trump’s upset victory, each of them broke into tears and asked the same question: what will happen to our Muslim friends? I didn’t have a good answer, and I still don’t. But I do know this: here in Vermont it is our Muslim neighbors who are keeping America great and making us feel right at home.

Preserving and Promoting Italy's Ancient Borghi

Formally proclaimed this week by Culture Minister Dario Franceschini, 2017 is the official Year of the Borghi, dedicated to promoting and preserving Italy's 1,000 ancient towns.

A Vote for Trump: Right Deed, Right Reason ... Hopefully.

Voting is a private matter; that's why there are curtains on the polling booths. So when I-ITALY Magazine asked for reflections upon my preference - and vote - for Donald Trump, I was hesitant, but agreed nonetheless to present what would be a counter opinion to many they had received.

Our Personal Immigrant Heroes

What prompts peoples to embark on perilous, unknown journeys in search of hospitable lands, if not desperation? For the vast majority of people around the world, the motives remain: hunger, oppression, war. These are good reasons to leave home. We should never demonize such people. They are us. This was our past. I have always referred to my parents as “economic refugees” due to the dire situation in which they (like so many others) found themselves after WWII. We pray it will never be our future. But it might.

Rather Than Closing Our Borders in Fear, Consider the Benefits of Opening Our Doors to Immigrant Students

Were it not for the United States’ earlier generous stance towards foreign students, even those from former enemy nations, I would not be here myself. My father came to the United States in 1953 on one of the first Fulbright scholarships. And even though he came from Italy, an enemy nation during much of WWII, he and countless others like him were welcomed to the United States through these scholarships.
Facebook i-Italy

Italian Americans are Split over Trump—But Conservatives are More Vocal than Liberals

The most commonly held view of Italian Americans is that they are overwhelmingly conservative. Our social network experience, however, tells us a different, more complex story. In response to the recent presidential executive order, i-Italy has published a series of articles from various contributors who took the side of opposition. Once the posts hit Facebook, we received mixed feedback from our readers. While the hundreds of "likes" and "shares" received in the first 24 hours show that the majority applaud the content, many of the comments and replies suggest otherwise—most defend Trump’s reasoning and argue with the opinions presented in the articles. This proves that not all Italian Americans are of the same mindset. It also reflects a historical shift in public behavior that has already been observed many times in America: liberals tend to constitute a more "silent" majority online (they are content with pressing the "like" button) while conservatives are more vocal and tend to occupy the sphere of public discourse (they use the "comments" tool more frequently).

Palermo is Voted Italy's Culture Capital 2018

Culture Minister Dario Franceschini announced that Palermo was voted Culture Capital of Italy for 2018. For the honor Palermo bested Trento, Aquileia, Montebelluna, Settimo Torinese, Comacchio, Recanati, Ercolano, Alghero and the twin townships of Erice and Elimo in Eastern Sicily.

LA VIGNETTA - “Is the American Dream Over?”

There has been some talk lately that has many people asking if the newly elected President is more than just a problem for the United States, for Muslims, and for women. The Muslim ban is the first of many attempts to undermine individual liberties and human rights. This is why Trump is not just a problem for America but rather for the whole world–regardless of how much political or economic power he may hold.
Golden Door - Nuovomondo

Where are the Golden Door and the “Neworld” Heading?

When President Trump signed his Executive Order, I was preparing for my classes, and happened to be working on a lecture and discussion of Emanuele Crialese’s Golden Door (Nuovomondo – in Italian), a film about historical migration from Italy to the U.S. The story follows the travails of an extremely poor Sicilian family, the Mancusos, embarking on the transatlantic journey to reach the U.S. at the time of Mass Migration; it offers its take on concepts that in these days are omnipresent in the public debate: the image of the U.S. as a land of immigrants; the process of vetting those arriving at its boundaries; and the rejection of those deemed “unfit.” Mutatis mutandis, it’s not hard to extrapolate to a Syrian family searching for a new opportunity after much deprivation and suffering in their home country. For those of us living so close to that very statue that lifts its lamp beside the golden door in the New York Bay, the question about where the new world of the Mancuso family, “America,” is heading has never been more pressing.

After Ellis Island? Italians at the Border in the Age of Trump

Italians do know what it means seeking entry to the United States with fear of detention, deportation, and refusal.

The Italian American Contribution to Trump’s Muslim Immigration Ban

The First Amendment of the United States Constitution (1979) simply states: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."

Walls and Bans. A View from San Diego

As a scholar of Italian Studies with an interest in migration, working at a large Hispanic-designated public university in San Diego, the series of executive orders issued by the new U.S. President last week raised some puzzling questions about their impact in my region and their resonance with past events related to Italy’s emigrant and colonial histories.

"Immigration Ban." An Italian American Perspective

President Trump’s recent Executive Order can be seen in two very different historical perspectives. On the one hand, it is in keeping with a long tradition of demonizing immigrants—something Italians, among others, have long experienced in the past. On the other hand, Americans often point with pride to the history of accepting immigrants, as embodied (literally) in the figure of the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor. Italian Americans have a particular responsibility in this new (or old) political landscape.

Joy and Despair as High Court Clears Way for Early Elections

In the final, clipped sentence of its ruling Jan. 25, the Constitutional Court cleared the way for national general elections to be held, even this spring, one year ahead of the formal end of the legislature. Those jubilant over the decision included Matteo Renzi, Beppe Grillo and Matteo Salvini.

Pantheon: To Pay or Not to Pay, That is the Question

Should visitors to the Pantheon, Rome's most popular single monument, pay an entry ticket? That Rome needs funds to maintain its treasures is obvious, but the answer is anything but simple.

Italy Cradle of Culture, but do Italians Care? Yes

A new ISTAT report shocked many here for its showing that one out of every five Italians never, ever reads a newspaper or a book, or attends a cultural event of any kind. On the other hand, it means that four out of five Italians do participate in the nation's vibrant cultural life, beginning with museums.

Venice Prefect: Migration, the Problem of Problems

For Venetian Prefect Carlo Boffi, "Migration is the problem of problems for Italy and the EU -- an extremely complex problem of Biblical dimensions." Nevertheless it is heartening to see that kind hearts can still prevail.

Addio Lella Vignelli. Legendary Designer

“Lella Vignelli, a Designer With a Spare, Elegant Style, Dies at 82” wrote The New York Times a couple of days ago. The digital magazine Quartz summarizes in a few words the story of the famous couple, Lella and Massimo Vignelli, and their difficult battle against the flow: “A legendary husband-and-wife design team fought to get her equal credit for 40 years.” To remember Lella, we decided to re-publish our article about Designed by: Lella Vignelli—a book of love that her husband Massimo edited in 2013, just few weeks before passing away. The book is a compendium of Lella’s contributions to design. Born out of a conversation with Massimo, our longtime friend, the article was entitled “The Realist and the Dreamer,” where “The Realist” was Lella—not his muse, but his wife and life-long professional partner. Massimo wanted the book to be an inspiration to all women, and circulated it free on the Internet. “For years,” Massimo wrote in his introduction, “the collaboration between female architects and designers and their partners has been under-appreciated …” And, he maintained, Lella had always been the hard rock behind his dreams: “consistent throughout her career; unfailingly intelligent; rigorous, not arbitrary; timeless, not trendy.”

2016: The Italian Year That Was

For better and sometimes for worse, 2016 had its memorable moments. Given the importance of the arts in Italy, among the events of the year listed below are also major art exhibitions and performances of grand opera.