header i-Italy

Articles by: Letizia Airos

  • Life & People

    July 20, 1969: “I’m Going to the Moon, Too. Dad, Will You Come with Me?”

     

     July 20, 1969. Blue eyes on the screen. Small eyes and big eyes, drowsy, but forcibly kept open. Sitting on the family’s sofa, a father and daughter are surrounded by the silence of the town. This was a vacation night unlike any other.

     
    Everyone in the apartment is sleeping. The pendulum on the wall marks the minutes, every half hour or so the church’s bells accompany it but they are not all in sync. The bells were still not able to chime simultaneously and yet man was about to make history. At least at that time. There was no Internet, there weren’t CDs, Apple hadn’t invented anything yet, and there weren’t even cell phones.
     
    The little girl who was not yet eight years old had not yet turned 8 thought about the images from her school books, the pictures of the moon in different phases, sketches but also scientific research. She was filled with the desire to know and the dream to experience it with her father. “I’m going to the moon, too. Dad, will you come with me?” Happy to know how to read, she tried to capture the subtitles on television.

    Nestled close to her father, she wanted to understand, but she could ask very little. The pact was to remain standing, being careful not to wake her little sister, mom, grandparents.

    The black and white TV images sent from the United States take her to the moon. The moon is so far away but not much further than America in the mind of that child – the America of her grandfathers’ friends who returned to the town on vacation with green cards. Grandfather Salvatore looked at them with dreamy eyes, proud. His friends had made it!

    How far away America was! And if the Americans managed to get to the moon, they were at least as far away as the inhabitants of the earth’s satellite. At least, that’s what the little girl thought.

    But were there really men on the moon? There had to be for sure. Perhaps they were hidden in those holes, for which she had recently learned the correct term: craters.

    Beside her was her father, about thirty-five years old. There was hope for the future in the air, hope that was so palpable in the ‘60s. He had just bought a new house in Rome, he was succeeding in his career. The return each year to the town of his birth was nearly triumphal for him.

     
    He was the son of a laborer who was able to study and who had “made it.” He no longer suffered that hunger that so many remembered indeed! Yes, even for him, everything seemed possible, conquerable with hard work. Even the moon.

    And finally her heart jumps into her throat, but for only a second.... “It has landed,” says the reporter Tito Stagno. From the U.S., his colleague Ruggero Orlando responds, “It has not landed.” Shortly after, it’s confirmed.  

    The Lem, that strange mechanical animal with feet, is really on lunar soil. Along with two other reporters, the bigwig Italian journalist, Andrea Barbato, provides commentary. But the little girl does not know this at the time.

    Those sleepy eyes awaken, in search of images. The first images arrive upside down, but only of the moon. Perhaps the moon is upside down? Instinctively, she turns her head upside down.

    It will be a long night for the father and child, a night full of thoughts, comments, and emotions, and so many dreams.

    All this unfolds until the moment in which Armstrong places the first human foot on the moon. He utters that historic phrase that makes us reflect: “It’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”  

    It’s a sentiment that is still moving today but it does so in a way that they would have never imagined back then – both the father who is no longer here and that little girl who remembers him more than the moon.

  • Lidia in her teenage years. (Courtesy of Lidia Bastianich)
    Life & People

    Lidia Matticchio Bastianich: Nostalgia and Success

    The name Lidia Bastianich is synonymous with exquisite Italian cuisine. Many people know the talented chef from her fine Italian restaurants and her various television programs throughout the years. However, Ms. Bastianich’s professional accomplishments are only one component of her intriguing and significant personal history. As a child, Lidia grew up between three different worlds–each one having a significant impact on her and her future. i-Italy had the pleasure of sitting down with the world-renowned chef in order to better understand her roots and to help share her story.

    Beginnings in Istria

    It was February 1947; World War II had ended, and the Paris Peace Treaties were about to be signed. Until that point, the Istrian peninsula was primarily under Italy’s control following World War I. Despite having Italian governance, Italians living in Istria had a very difficult existence; many of them faced violence or death during the Foibe massacres occurring near the end of World War II. The Paris Peace Treaties, however, were a final nail in the coffin for many of those individuals as the treaties granted control of the Istria to Yugoslavia. Istrian-Italians knew they either needed to adapt to a new way of life or to emigrate from the peninsula. Many chose the latter option, so many, in fact, that the time period was known as the “Istrian Exodus.”

    That same month, February 1947, Lidia Matticchio (later Bastianich) was born in the middle of the political unrest. Her family resided in Pola, and she would live there for the first nine years of her life along with her parents and her older brother–three years her superior. Lidia recalled that life in Pola during that time meant change for many of its residents. People were changing their names, changing the language they spoke, and even changing religion. She shared with an anecdote about her grandmother: “My grandmother would discreetly take me to church, and she would discreetly speak to me in Italian. All of these things, you really felt them as a young girl. It was difficult to exist in this uncertainty.”

    Moving Across the Border

    When Lidia was approximately ten years old, her parents decided that they could no longer raise their two children in that environment. During that time, it was not possible to simply leave Istria as a refugee; those looking to escape had to truly run away. Fortunately, the Matticchio family had relatives in Trieste, Italy. Lidia’s parents decided that she, her brother, and her mother would go to Italy to visit their family. Her father, however, had to stay behind in Istria. Lidia recalls, “They didn’t let the whole family go. They always held one as a hostage.” This system was enacted to ensure that those who went abroad would always return for the family member left behind. However, two weeks later, Lidia’s father fled Istria and arrived safely in Trieste.

    The events of this tumultuous time stuck with young Lidia. She remembers her aunt who lived in Italy and who brought her son into the woods to avoid the Foibe massacres, but he never returned. Work in Italy was scarce and did not provide a secure life; Lidia’s father worked as a chauffeur for a the Rossetti family, and her mother cleaned houses. Again, Lidia’s parents felt compelled to make a change.

    Crossing the Atlantic

    Anyone who was interested in emigrating from Italy needed to enter into a refugee camp. Lidia’s parents had been contemplating entering the camp in Trieste, San Saba, for a few months before they finally decided to sign up. Lidia shared with us a bit of her experience there: “I remember that as soon as we entered, they put us in quarantine. Quaratine meant that they stripped you of your clothes; they took everything from you, and they looked to see if you were healthy. Then they put us in a rather dark room, and they put my father in another because they separated the men. Even now I remember it because there was this small window, and I was looking between the bars to see if I could see my father coming. After 40 hours, they reunited us, and we were all much more relaxed.” Lidia and her family stayed in this camp for two years. She recalls waiting in line for food every day with her small plate and living in a big room divided into small sections. The family left the camp’s grounds from time to time in order to visit Lidia’s aunts and uncles; however, in order to remain in line for emigration, the Matticchio family needed to continue to reside in the camp.

    Finally, in 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower opened up immigration to America, and the Matticchios were among the first to arrive in the United States. They first entered the United States through Idlewild Airport in New York City, which is known today as John F. Kennedy International Airport. Their journey was assisted by both Caritas and the Red Cross. Lidia recalls that as young children, she and her brother felt the United States was a place with beautiful music, beautiful homes, and artists. However, her parents found the experience to be a bit more frightening as they did not know anyone in their new country, and they did not speak the language. After living in New York City for two months, Lidia’s family found a job for her father as a mechanic, and they relocated to North Bergen, New Jersey.

    The Foundation of a Culinary Career

    After Lidia’s family finally felt some stability, her own career began to take off. Her roots, however, always remained fundamental to her success. Lidia remembers that when she was a child, her mother would often leave her in the care of her grandmother. Lidia told us: “I was her little helper; I went behind her, and I would cook with her. I remember when the goats were milked, she made me ricotta with a bit of honey on it, and that was my breakfast. It’s great! When arrived in Trieste, I knew we wouldn’t be going back. I felt like something was ripped away from me because I didn’t say goodbye to my grandmother or my friends, nothing. We just left, and that was it. I believe food remained as my connection and my tie to my grandmother. The scents, the flavors, everything. I continued cooking in order to keep her close to me.” Lidia’s also stated that father was very nostalgic, and he loved to make traditional baccalà mantecato from Veneto. To this day, Lidia still makes this dish on Christmas Eve because it feels as if her father is there with her.

    Lidia first began cooking at home. When she was in school, she started working part time at a bakery; she enjoyed the work, and it gave her a chance to develop her skills. Subsequently, when she was attending Hunter College, she began working in restaurants and she felt that she was on the right path. Lidia’s husband, Felice, was also another important part of her successful culinary career. Felice was already involved in the restaurant industry. The two met when Lidia went to visit a distant cousin in Astoria, Queens. They married, had their first child, Joseph, and opened their first restaurant, which was in Queens. They hired a chef, and Lidia worked closely alongside him for ten years as a sous-chef.

    In 1981, after making several trips back and forth to Italy, Felice and Lidia opened Felidia in Manhattan. Lidia became the chef, and she made the switch from preparing Italian-American cuisine to cooking genuine Italian regional cuisine. Today, the head chef of this East Side gem is Fortunato Nicotra, and the menu is as eclectic as ever.

    Words of Wisdom

    We asked Lidia if she had any advice or perhaps a positive message for those who are going through difficult times. She told us, “I would give strength and opportunity to someone who is looking to restart his or her life and looking to find a stable place to live. If you give that helping hand, once you’re gone, those people are then able to help themselves, assuming they have the desire to. You need to give someone the opportunity when he/she needs it, just like my family and me were given. We’re a perfect example of what can happen when someone seizes this opportunity. Naturally, yes, we worked very hard; yes, we made sacrifices along the way. Yes, my grandmother, my mother, and my father cried on several occasions. Yes, to all of these things, but in the end, you make something beautiful for yourself, a great opportunity.”
     

    Don't forget to tune in to NYC Life (Channel 25) on Sunday, Febraury 26th for our exclusive conversation between Letizia Airos and Lidia Bastianich.

  • Art & Culture

    Long Live the Italian Language in America's Public Schools

    IN ITALIANO > > >

    Thanks to the extraordinary work of two hard working mothers, Stefania Puxeddu and Benedetta Scardovi-Mounier, Italian children will have a chance to study Italian in public schools in New York City. In the 2018-19 school year two Dual Language Program will take off: one at PS242 in Manhattan (West Harlem) and the other one at PS132 in Williamsburg.

    At an institutional level, their initiative has the full support of the Consulate General of ltaly in New York and the Italian American Committee on Education, by spreading the word among Italian families with pre-school children and by allocating funds received by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation to be spent for the salary of teachers and for the purchase of didactic material.

    “Several events are going to be organized – says Ilaria Costa, Executive Director of the Italian American Committee on Education (IACE) – to inform Italian families about the right to have a Dual Language in public schools and to encourage them maintain the Italian language and culture alive in the academic life of their children.”

    The objective is rather hard to achieve. “The biggest obstacle is finding teachers that are bilingual and that have the qualifications required by the Department of Education (DOE). Teachers must be able to teach the common core curriculum both in English and in Italian, and the various diplomas such as Ditals 1 and 2 have little to do with the elementary public school curriculum, which has to align with the common core imposed by the NYDOE and with the right linguistic knowledge of Italian”.

    Ilaria Costa adds: “On top of that, it is very important that the interested families take concrete steps by enrolling their children in the public school that offer a Dual Language Program because it is necessary to have at least 10 Italian students in order to activate a bilingual class in a public school”.

    But let’s meet the two moms, the super moms, which successfully started this very important process for themselves and many more families like them. 

    Benedetta Scardovi-Mounier from Imola and Stefania Puxeddu from Cagliari answered our questions.

    Is yours a multicultural family? In the house how many languages do you speak?

    B: “I’ve been married with my French husband for 13 years and we have three kids:Gaston (almost 9 years old), Leelou (7) and Adele (4). In the house we espeak 3 languages. Since the kids were born we chose the One Parent One Language approach: I always speak Italian to the kids, while my husband speaks French to them. My 2 older kids are enrolled in 3rdand 1stgrade in the French Dual Language Program of PS84 in Manhattan and we are very pleased with how their knowledge of French has been solidified in the writing and reading on top of the spoken aspects”.

    S: “My husband is from New Zealand, but speaks Italian well, we have one 9-year-old child, Matteo. We try to keep both languages at home - I also studied German, my husband did modern Greek and we both speak Spanish. When I can, I take Matteo to Italy and London, UK, where he was born and where we still have family and friends. My objective is to have him experience European culture whilst encouraging good quality family time". 

    How important is it for you that your children speak Italian?

    B: “For me it is very important that my kids speak Italian and that they are able to communicate and feel comfortable when we go to Italy for our summer vacations. Knowing the language, the traditions and the Italian culture is part of our family identity”.

    S: “I want Matteo to speak and read Italian and also to learn about the complex history of my country not just because he has an Italian grandmother, uncles, aunts and cousins to speak to, but also, because, overall, he has so much to learn from Europe".

    When did you decide to actively carry out the campaign for the introduction of Italian in the American public schools? Where did this idea spring from?

    B: “When it came to enrolling our children in school we quickly realized that in Manhattan there were no resources for Italian quantity and quality wise compared to other languages. When last year I met Stefania during a meeting for Greenness and Sustainability in District 3 Schools, she got me on board with the idea that we had to do something to fill this void”.

    S: “Besides not being able to learn and speak Italian at school, we have had to deal with the huge cultural gap between New York and the rest of the anglophone countries, whose culture we have been and continue to be exposed. I have always been very sensitive about cultural barriers and all those ‘unwritten rules’ which emerge when a family moves to a place such as New York City.

    I am sure we can all easily agree that New York has a lot to offer, however, it is also true that not all the families are willing to spend a lot of money for all those services. When I found out that the DOE gives the chance to start a bilingual program at public schools, I realized that my bilingual and multicultural expectations were not so unrealistic and I decided to inform the Italian families of their bi-literacy rights.”

    And very few parents know that…

    S: “Many of those families who move from Italy are not aware about the bi-literacy offer of the DOE. I would like to be able to launch an after school ‘enrichment’ program in Italian at NY public schools, for those children who have missed the chance to attend a DLP.”

    How did you get organized? 

    S: “Most of our work is done by juggling different commitments at our children’s schools: for instance, I volunteer at the garden committee but also at the school library and am a member of the School Leadership Team. I represent the ELL of my school at the District 3 meetings.

    And of course we have a life and freelance jobs to take care of. Benedetta and I talk on a daily basis to share ideas, find solutions and plan ahead. Our logo has been created by my Milan-based sister following our suggestion: we wanted something which could resemble the sketchy style typical of our children.

    We wanted a logo which could simply represent Italy’s cultural diversity. A group of parents who are video producers suggested the idea of a video (and what a video!); a father from another district volunteered to distribute our flyers; a mother helped us pick up a donation of second hand books in excellent conditions… I think I can speak for Benedetta when I say that the community of Italian families is a major added value to New York famous melting pot.”

    Who is helping you?  

    S: “Our ELL District 3 representative Lucas Liu and Teresa Arboleda (CEC Citywide) have always been supportive, even before Benedetta became involved. The delightful DOE Director of Bilingual Programs Cynthia Felix and Yalitza Vasquez, chief of staff for the department's Division of English Language Learners were immediately enthusiastic at the prospect of an Italian DL. We speak to them fairly regularly.

    The many Italian families with preschool children, who have recently moved to New York; our Consulate has been extremely supportive: meetings, events and workshops have been organized, during which we were able to announce the DL initiative. Resources have been donated and along with IACE, funds have been allocated to host workshops for teachers and scholarships.

    Even the representatives of other language communities have shown their support: the French with Fabrice Jaumont and Russian mum Olga Ilyashenko have encouraged to continue this campaign. We would like to thank you, Letizia, for your hospitality, Stefano Vaccara and Anthony Tamburri, the italophone community, We The Italians, the ANSA press agency, ilSole24Ore (the equivalent of the WSJ and the FT) and several other newspapers of the Emilia Romagna region, which wanted to voice our campaign.”

    What do you want to achieve?

    S: “We want to start a DL program and an after school program in many more public schools and be able to prove that the New York based Italian community is longing for actively participating in the multicultural activities which the Big Apple has to offer.”

    What are the biggest challenges that you have encountered?

    S: “After the intense family recruitment process we carried out in the past few months since March, now we are looking for qualified teachers that are certified by the NY DOE. The DOE imposes very strict requirements for the candidate teachers in NYC public schools but at the same time, under the guidance of Chancellor Carranza, an ELL himself, it is promoting a significant expansion of the Dual Language programs. In the school year 2018-19, 48 new DL programs will be opened in various languages. 

    Given the lack of candidates with a solid knowledge of Italian, we are directing our efforts towards those candidates that have a good level of Italian and that are interested in pursuing the NY State Certification, rather than those who are already in the DOE database but lack the fundamental requisites to teach a curriculum in Italian.”

    Let’s talk about the video which you are using to advertise your campaign. 

    S: “The video has been shot and produced by three Italian parents (Luca Fantini and Veronica Diaferia Fantini with Vanessa Manca Barbot). The idea was to promote the DLP during a picnic which we organized in Central Parkon May, with the objective of getting to know each other after we exchanged emails and messages on Facebook.

    The event was a huge success and many families joined us from Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens. We have been asked to organize more, which is something we are already thinking about.”

    Ilaria Costa is quite optimistic: “We are very hopeful and optimistic because we know that the NYC DOE is strongly committed to expanding DL programs to make them available to different language communities. We also realize that we need to take advantage from the momentum and continue to encourage the “bilingual revolution” in many more areas of the Big Apple.

    This does not come without challenges - finding teachers with the right degrees and certifications is one of them. We also need to continue to fill those classes with native Italian speaking children. However, we trust the determination of parents such as Stefania and Benedetta and we will work towards the increase of programs so as to offer the Italian DL to more NY children."

     

    ---

    If you are interested please contact Benedetta and Stefania via Facebook >>

  • Opinioni

    Il nostro messaggio nella bottiglia. Facciamo rete!

    Un’Italia per tutti
     
    Nel mio primo editoriale scrissi che questo era “un magazine con il cuore”. Ed è questo infatti lo spirito con cui siamo ancora oggi testardamente in giro. Ma perchè non ce ne siamo rimasti solo online? Sempre il cuore...
    Su Internet ci siamo nati, è casa nostra. Ma il contatto fisico con il territorio e con la gente rimane fondamentale, e integrare media diversi è stata la nostra sfida: un’Italia per tutti, dappertutto. Online e sui social ogni giorno ovunque sei; nella tua in-box il venerdì; nella TV davanti al tuo divano, la domenica. E in carta ogni due mesi per una lettura più approfondita, rilassata; e non più solo a New York, ma anche a Boston, Washington, Los Angeles, San Francisco, e presto a Miami e Chicago.
     
    Ma oggi, giunti dove siamo, c’è la domanda che si fa nel giorno del compleanno: cosa faremo da grandi? La risposta non l’abbiamo, ma sappiamo che la vera sfida ci sta difronte. E che non possiamo vincerla fino in fondo da soli.  E’ venuto il momento di lanciare un messaggio a chi crede davvero nell’importanza di comunicare l’italianità fuori dall’Italia. Un messaggio che va al di là dell’esistenza e dell’esperienza di i-Italy.
     

    La vera sfida: un “Network Italico” 
    La vera sfida che abbiamo davanti è quella della comunicazione professionale dell’Italia negli USA. Dare una scossa ad un panorama editoriale che, nonostante gli sforzi nostri e di altri, rimane deludente. Perchè, ci chiediamo, avendo in mano un gioiello come il “Brand Italia” si fa così poco e così male, ancora oggi, perfino in America? 
     
    Perchè non c’è ancora un vero grande network televisivo “italico” in America? Un “Italian_Food+Travel+Lifestyle_Channel” che racconti ogni giorno—ma in inglese, per carità!—le migliaia di storie e di persone, di luoghi e di ricette, di eventi culturali e di prodotti di qualità che fanno l’esperienza italiana in questo paese? E perchè non c’è un magazine a distribuzione nazionale che faccia lo stesso, magari in sinergia con il video? E poi una piattaforma digitale (o una “federazione di piattaforme digitali”) che rimandi tutto questo online, sui social? 
     
    E’ vero, questo è il modello i-Itay. Ma per realizzarlo davvero su scala nazionale negli USA, ci vuole qualcosa di molto più grande. Perchè non c’è?
    Manca il pubblico? Non credo proprio. Negli USA c’è una “nicchia di mercato” di almeno 50 milioni di persone che per motivi affettivi, genetici, professionali, culturali o semplicemente di gusto, amano l’Italia. Quasi 20 milioni di loro hanno un’origine italiana; non parlano più la lingua, ma hanno l’Italia nel cuore. Poi ci sono i milioni di americani che riempiono i ristoranti e le pizzerie italiane; quelli che adorano il gourmet, la moda e il design italiani; e poi gli amanti dell’arte e del cinema, della letteratura e della musica. Il pubblico c’è, si può fare.

    Mancano le risorse? Mi sembra difficile. Sul lato italo-americano, ci sono influenti associazioni e fondazioni con migliaia di aderenti tra cui imprenditori, managers, professionisti, artisti e celebrities. Sul lato italiano ci sono apposite istituzioni di promozione culturale e commerciale, spesso attivissime. Quanto al mondo economico, ci sono migliaia di aziende italiane e italo-americane, piccole e grandi, molte delle quali di alto prestigio. E tante altre sono pronte a sbarcare su questo mercato. Le risorse ci sono, si può fare.
     
     
    Più forti insieme?
     
    E allora perchè si fa ancora tanto poco e tanto male sul piano della comunicazione? La risposta più diffusa è che manca una visione comune. Gli italiani non fanno squadra quasi mai. La frammentazione è una costante del carattere italiano, che non sa (e spesso non vuole) collaborare. L’individualismo italiano—grande ricchezza di creatività, ma grande limite all’affermazione competitiva nel mondo globale di oggi!
     
    Questo è certamente vero e si applica a tutti, dal mondo dell’associazionismo italo-americano a quello delle imprese italiane all’estero. Ma mentre lancio questo  messaggio nella bottiglia che invita a fare squadra, voglio anche fare un mea culpa come operatore della comunicazione.
     

    Noi professionisti della comunicazione, italiani, italo-americani, e americani “italofili”, con la passione per il giornalismo e la missione del “raccontare italiano” ci  siamo sparpagliati in decine di piccole esperienze: siti web, blog, pagine facebook e, localmente, qualche giornale in carta e qualche programma televisivo. Alcune di queste esperienza sono di ottima qualità e hanno un seguito non indifferente. Ma non abbiamo saputo unirci in un network, creare una rete capace di proporsi innanzitutto al pubblico, e poi al mercato: a chi ha risorse da investire, ma non ha un mezzo di comunicazione adeguato a raggiungere efficacemente la vastissima “nicchia Italica” negli USA. 
    Vogliamo provarci insieme? La nostra esperienza dimostra che è possibile crescere, ma dobbiamo farlo insieme se vogliamo fare la differenza. Noi siamo pronti ad andare oltre i-Italy con chi vorrà unirsi a noi in un progetto comune culturalmente valido ed economicamente sostenibile.
    Buon compleanno!.    
    -----

    Your Message in the Bottle. It Takes a Network!

     
    The magazine you’re holding in your hands is a special edition that celebrates our first five years, with a selection of the best of our articles, interviews, and reporting. The pieces you see here, are almost all print versions of our television stories shown on our “i-Italy TV” program, now also five years old, which airs every Sunday on NYC Life. And our web portal, i-Italy.org, turns 10 in May.
     
    An Italy for all
     
    In my first editorial I wrote that this was “a magazine with a heart.” And this is indeed the spirit with which we are still stubbornly around today. But why didn’t we just stay online? Still, because of the heart, I guess.
    We were born online: the Internet is our home. But because keeping physical contact with the people and the world around us remains fundamental.,our challenge has been integrating different media, online and offline. Our Italy is everywhere, and speaks to everyone. You can find it on the web and on social networks, every day. wherever you are, in your in-box every Friday. If you live in the New York City area, you can sit on your sofa and watch us on TV, every Sunday at 1pm. And look for us, on glossy paper, every two months for more in-depth, relaxed reading—you can find us in New York , Boston, Washington, DC, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and soon in Miami and Chicago. 
    But today we face the typical birthday question: What will we do when we grow up? We don’t have the answer yet, but we do know that the biggest challenge so far lies in front of us. And that we cannot meet it by ourselves alone. The time has come to rally all those who truly believe in the importance of communicating Italicity in this country with a message that goes beyond the existence and experience of i-Italy.
     
     
    The real challenge: an “Italic Network”
     
    The real challenge we face is to reshape an editorial landscape that, despite ours and others’ efforts, has yet to yield its full potential. Why, we wonder, having in our hands a powerful tool like “Brand Italy,” so little is done, and so poorly, even today, even in America?
     
    Why isn’t there yet a major “Italic” television network in America? An “Italian_Food + Travel + Lifestyle_Channel” to tell us everyday in English (please!) about the thousands of stories and people, places and recipes, cultural events and quality products that are in fact the Italian experience in this country? And why don’t we have a national magazine that does the same, in synergy with other media? And finally a digital platform (or a “federation of digital platforms”) to connect all of this to social networks?
     
    This is our model. We conceived it, and we started it. But realizing its rich potential nationwide takes many more resources. Where are these resources to be found?
    Is a consumer public missing? I don’t think so. In the US there is a “market niche” of at least 50 million people who love Italy for emotional, family, professional, or cultural reasons—or just for pleasure. Almost 20 million of them have Italian roots; they may no longer speak the language, but they have Italy in their hearts. Then there are the millions of food and wine lovers who fill Italian restaurants and pizzerias coast to coast; those who adore Italian fashion and design; and those who appreciate Italian art, cinema, literature and music. The audience is there. It can be done!
     
    And the resources essential for reaching this audience are also there. On the Italian-American side, there are influential associations and foundations with thousands of members including entrepreneurs, managers, professionals, artists, and celebrities. On the Italian side there are special institutions for the promotion of culture, commerce, and tourism, and they’re often very active. As for the business world, there are thousands of Italian and Italian-American companies, small and large, many of them very successful. And many others are poised to connect to this market. The resources are there.  And they can be tapped.
     
     
    Stronger Together?
     
    So why so little and so poorly is done in this field? The usual answer is that Italians share no common vision of how things get done. They do not work as a team, and individualism is an old, persistent part of the Italian character, which doesn’t know how to collaborate. Italian individualism is a great wellspring for creativity, but also a big barrier to competitiveness and success in today’s global world! This kind of fragmentation affects both the world of Italian-American associations and Italian companies abroad. And it affects the media, too. 
     
    All of us in the profession of communication—Italians, Italian-Americans, and American “italophiles” with a passion for journalism and the mission of “Italian storytelling”—are scattered in dozens of little corners: websites, blogs, Facebook pages and, locally, a few newspapers and a handful of television programs. Some are media of excellent quality with a significant  following. But we haven’t even tried to unite and collaborate to a larger, national-level information and communication network capable of making connections—to the public, and to the marketplace. And to those looking to invest but without ways to effectively reach the vast “Italic niche” in the US.
     
    Why not try? Our experience shows there is room to grow, but we must do it together if we want to make a difference. We are ready to go beyond i-Italy with those who want to join us in building a culturally and economically sustainable project. If we do that, in five years we’ll be discovering America (one more time).
    Happy Birthday!   
     
     
  • Op-Eds

    Your Message in the Bottle. It Takes a Network!

    An Italy for all
     
    In my first editorial I wrote that this was “a magazine with a heart.” And this is indeed the spirit with which we are still stubbornly around today. But why didn’t we just stay online? Still, because of the heart, I guess.
    We were born online: the Internet is our home. But because keeping physical contact with the people and the world around us remains fundamental.,our challenge has been integrating different media, online and offline. Our Italy is everywhere, and speaks to everyone. You can find it on the web and on social networks, every day. wherever you are, in your in-box every Friday. If you live in the New York City area, you can sit on your sofa and watch us on TV, every Sunday at 1pm. And look for us, on glossy paper, every two months for more in-depth, relaxed reading—you can find us in New York , Boston, Washington, DC, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and soon in Miami and Chicago. 
    But today we face the typical birthday question: What will we do when we grow up? We don’t have the answer yet, but we do know that the biggest challenge so far lies in front of us. And that we cannot meet it by ourselves alone. The time has come to rally all those who truly believe in the importance of communicating Italicity in this country with a message that goes beyond the existence and experience of i-Italy.
     
     
    The real challenge: an “Italic Network”
     
    The real challenge we face is to reshape an editorial landscape that, despite ours and others’ efforts, has yet to yield its full potential. Why, we wonder, having in our hands a powerful tool like “Brand Italy,” so little is done, and so poorly, even today, even in America?
     
    Why isn’t there yet a major “Italic” television network in America? An “Italian_Food + Travel + Lifestyle_Channel” to tell us everyday in English (please!) about the thousands of stories and people, places and recipes, cultural events and quality products that are in fact the Italian experience in this country? And why don’t we have a national magazine that does the same, in synergy with other media? And finally a digital platform (or a “federation of digital platforms”) to connect all of this to social networks?
     
    This is our model. We conceived it, and we started it. But realizing its rich potential nationwide takes many more resources. Where are these resources to be found?
    Is a consumer public missing? I don’t think so. In the US there is a “market niche” of at least 50 million people who love Italy for emotional, family, professional, or cultural reasons—or just for pleasure. Almost 20 million of them have Italian roots; they may no longer speak the language, but they have Italy in their hearts. Then there are the millions of food and wine lovers who fill Italian restaurants and pizzerias coast to coast; those who adore Italian fashion and design; and those who appreciate Italian art, cinema, literature and music. The audience is there. It can be done!
     
    And the resources essential for reaching this audience are also there. On the Italian-American side, there are influential associations and foundations with thousands of members including entrepreneurs, managers, professionals, artists, and celebrities. On the Italian side there are special institutions for the promotion of culture, commerce, and tourism, and they’re often very active. As for the business world, there are thousands of Italian and Italian-American companies, small and large, many of them very successful. And many others are poised to connect to this market. The resources are there.  And they can be tapped.
     
     
    Stronger Together?
     
    So why so little and so poorly is done in this field? The usual answer is that Italians share no common vision of how things get done. They do not work as a team, and individualism is an old, persistent part of the Italian character, which doesn’t know how to collaborate. Italian individualism is a great wellspring for creativity, but also a big barrier to competitiveness and success in today’s global world! This kind of fragmentation affects both the world of Italian-American associations and Italian companies abroad. And it affects the media, too. 
     
    All of us in the profession of communication—Italians, Italian-Americans, and American “italophiles” with a passion for journalism and the mission of “Italian storytelling”—are scattered in dozens of little corners: websites, blogs, Facebook pages and, locally, a few newspapers and a handful of television programs. Some are media of excellent quality with a significant  following. But we haven’t even tried to unite and collaborate to a larger, national-level information and communication network capable of making connections—to the public, and to the marketplace. And to those looking to invest but without ways to effectively reach the vast “Italic niche” in the US.
     
    Why not try? Our experience shows there is room to grow, but we must do it together if we want to make a difference. We are ready to go beyond i-Italy with those who want to join us in building a culturally and economically sustainable project. If we do that, in five years we’ll be discovering America (one more time).
    Happy Birthday!   
     
    ===================
     
    Il nostro messaggio nella bottiglia. Facciamo rete!
     
    Tra la mani avete un’edizione speciale per festeggiare i primi cinque anni di i-Italy Magazine, con una selezione dei nostri migliori servizi, le interviste, i reportage pubblicati.  Inoltre, quasi tutti sono il racconto cartaceo di servizi televisivi. Compie infatti 5 anni anche il nostro programma “i-ItalyTV” in onda ogni domenica alle 13 su NYC Life. Il portale web i-Italy.org, invece, ne farà 10 tra qualche mese, essendo stato varato nel maggio 2008!
     
     
    Un’Italia per tutti
     
    Nel mio primo editoriale scrissi che questo era “un magazine con il cuore”. Ed è questo infatti lo spirito con cui siamo ancora oggi testardamente in giro. Ma perchè non ce ne siamo rimasti solo online? Sempre il cuore...
    Su Internet ci siamo nati, è casa nostra. Ma il contatto fisico con il territorio e con la gente rimane fondamentale, e integrare media diversi è stata la nostra sfida: un’Italia per tutti, dappertutto. Online e sui social ogni giorno ovunque sei; nella tua in-box il venerdì; nella TV davanti al tuo divano, la domenica. E in carta ogni due mesi per una lettura più approfondita, rilassata; e non più solo a New York, ma anche a Boston, Washington, Los Angeles, San Francisco, e presto a Miami e Chicago.
     
    Ma oggi, giunti dove siamo, c’è la domanda che si fa nel giorno del compleanno: cosa faremo da grandi? La risposta non l’abbiamo, ma sappiamo che la vera sfida ci sta difronte. E che non possiamo vincerla fino in fondo da soli.  E’ venuto il momento di lanciare un messaggio a chi crede davvero nell’importanza di comunicare l’italianità fuori dall’Italia. Un messaggio che va al di là dell’esistenza e dell’esperienza di i-Italy.
     
    La vera sfida: un “Network Italico” 
    La vera sfida che abbiamo davanti è quella della comunicazione professionale dell’Italia negli USA. Dare una scossa ad un panorama editoriale che, nonostante gli sforzi nostri e di altri, rimane deludente. Perchè, ci chiediamo, avendo in mano un gioiello come il “Brand Italia” si fa così poco e così male, ancora oggi, perfino in America? 
     
    Perchè non c’è ancora un vero grande network televisivo “italico” in America? Un “Italian_Food+Travel+Lifestyle_Channel” che racconti ogni giorno—ma in inglese, per carità!—le migliaia di storie e di persone, di luoghi e di ricette, di eventi culturali e di prodotti di qualità che fanno l’esperienza italiana in questo paese? E perchè non c’è un magazine a distribuzione nazionale che faccia lo stesso, magari in sinergia con il video? E poi una piattaforma digitale (o una “federazione di piattaforme digitali”) che rimandi tutto questo online, sui social? 
     
    E’ vero, questo è il modello i-Itay. Ma per realizzarlo davvero su scala nazionale negli USA, ci vuole qualcosa di molto più grande. Perchè non c’è?
    Manca il pubblico? Non credo proprio. Negli USA c’è una “nicchia di mercato” di almeno 50 milioni di persone che per motivi affettivi, genetici, professionali, culturali o semplicemente di gusto, amano l’Italia. Quasi 20 milioni di loro hanno un’origine italiana; non parlano più la lingua, ma hanno l’Italia nel cuore. Poi ci sono i milioni di americani che riempiono i ristoranti e le pizzerie italiane; quelli che adorano il gourmet, la moda e il design italiani; e poi gli amanti dell’arte e del cinema, della letteratura e della musica. Il pubblico c’è, si può fare.
     
    Mancano le risorse? Mi sembra difficile. Sul lato italo-americano, ci sono influenti associazioni e fondazioni con migliaia di aderenti tra cui imprenditori, managers, professionisti, artisti e celebrities. Sul lato italiano ci sono apposite istituzioni di promozione culturale e commerciale, spesso attivissime. Quanto al mondo economico, ci sono migliaia di aziende italiane e italo-americane, piccole e grandi, molte delle quali di alto prestigio. E tante altre sono pronte a sbarcare su questo mercato. Le risorse ci sono, si può fare.
     
     
    Più forti insieme?
     
    E allora perchè si fa ancora tanto poco e tanto male sul piano della comunicazione? La risposta più diffusa è che manca una visione comune. Gli italiani non fanno squadra quasi mai. La frammentazione è una costante del carattere italiano, che non sa (e spesso non vuole) collaborare. L’individualismo italiano—grande ricchezza di creatività, ma grande limite all’affermazione competitiva nel mondo globale di oggi!
     
    Questo è certamente vero e si applica a tutti, dal mondo dell’associazionismo italo-americano a quello delle imprese italiane all’estero. Ma mentre lancio questo  messaggio nella bottiglia che invita a fare squadra, voglio anche fare un mea culpa come operatore della comunicazione.
     
    Noi professionisti della comunicazione, italiani, italo-americani, e americani “italofili”, con la passione per il giornalismo e la missione del “raccontare italiano” ci  siamo sparpagliati in decine di piccole esperienze: siti web, blog, pagine facebook e, localmente, qualche giornale in carta e qualche programma televisivo. Alcune di queste esperienza sono di ottima qualità e hanno un seguito non indifferente. Ma non abbiamo saputo unirci in un network, creare una rete capace di proporsi innanzitutto al pubblico, e poi al mercato: a chi ha risorse da investire, ma non ha un mezzo di comunicazione adeguato a raggiungere efficacemente la vastissima “nicchia Italica” negli USA. 
    Vogliamo provarci insieme? La nostra esperienza dimostra che è possibile crescere, ma dobbiamo farlo insieme se vogliamo fare la differenza. Noi siamo pronti ad andare oltre i-Italy con chi vorrà unirsi a noi in un progetto comune culturalmente valido ed economicamente sostenibile.
    Buon compleanno!.    
     
     
  • Arte e Cultura

    Viva l'Italiano nelle scuole pubbliche americane

    ENGLISH VERSION > > >

    Grazie al lavoro straordinario di due infaticabili mamme, Stefania Puxeddu e Benedetta Scardovi-Mounie, anche i piccoli italiani avranno finalmente l’opportunità di studiare l’italiano nelle scuole pubbliche della città di New York. Nell’anno scolastico 2018-19 inizieranno infatti due Dual Language Program (il primo a Manhattan presso la PS 242 a West Harlem ed il secondo presso la PS 132 a Williamsburg).

    A livello istituzionale il Consolato Generale d’Italia a New York e lo IACE hanno sostenuto e continuano a sostenere pienamente l’ iniziativa, sia attraverso una campagna informativa sui programmi bilingue presso le famiglie dei connazionali con bimbi in età prescolare sia attraverso l’assegnazione di fondi ad hoc per il salario dei docenti e per l’acquisto di materiale didattico erogati dal Ministero Affari Esteri e Cooperazione Internazionale.

    “A questo fine sono in programma - ci dice Ilaria Costa, direttore esecutivo dellThe Italian American Committee on Education (IACE)  - diversi incontri per le famiglie interessate con l’obiettivo primario di informare sul diritto ad avere un Dual Language Program nelle scuole pubbliche per mantenere viva la lingua e la cultura italiana nel percorso accademico dei propri figli”.

    È un percorso piuttosto difficile quello da fare. “Gli ostacoli più grossi si riscontrano nel trovare docenti che siano bilingue italiani, con le qualifiche richieste dal Department of Education (DOE). I maestri devono essere in grado di insegnare il curriculum pubblico in inglese così come in italiano, e i vari diplomi ditals 1 e 2  hanno poco a che fare con il curriculum elementare scolastico del DOE, che deve pure essere in linea con il Common Core con le qualifiche imposte dal Department of Education (DOE) della Città di New York e con una adeguata competenza linguistica in italiano”.

    E prosegue Ilaria Costa: “Oltre a ciò, è fondamentale che le famiglie interessate concretizzino il loro interesse iscrivendo i propri figli nella scuola pubblica che offre un tale Dual Language Program, poiché è necessario raggiungere un minimo di 10 studenti italiani per poter attivare una sezione bilingue presso la scuola pubblica”.

    Ma conosciamo le due mamme, super mamme, che hanno avviato con successo un lavoro importantissimo per tanti genitori come loro.

    Benedetta Scardovi-Mounier di Imola e Stefania Puxeddu originaria di Cagliari rispondono ad alcune nostre domande.

    La vostra è una famiglia multiculturale? In casa parlate più lingue?

    B: “Sono sposata da 13 anni con un francese e abbiamo tre figli: Gaston (di quasi 9 anni), Leelou (di 7) e Adele (di 4). In casa si parlano tre lingue. Fin dalla nascita abbiamo scelto di usare l’approccio One parent One Language: io parlo sempre in italiano con loro, mentre mio marito parla sempre in francese. I miei figli più grandi frequentano la terza e la prima elementare in un programma bilingue francese presso la PS84 di Manhattan e siamo molto soddisfatti di come le loro conoscenze della lingua si stiano solidificando anche a livello di scrittura e di lettura, oltre che a livello orale”.

    S: “Mio marito è neozelandese, ma parla bene l’italiano, e abbiamo un figlio di 9 anni, Matteo. In casa cerchiamo di mantenere entrambe le lingue (in verità, io ho anche studiato tedesco, mentre mio marito parla un po’ di greco moderno. Entrambi, inoltre, ce la caviamo con lo spagnolo) e quando posso, porto Matteo in Italia e a Londra, dov’è nato e dove abbiamo ancora amici e parenti italiani che ci vivono. Lo scopo per me è fargli fare una bella immersione nella cultura europea, oltre che ad incoraggiare i legami familiari”.

    Quanto è importante che i vostri figli parlino italiano?

    B: “Io ci tengo molto che i miei figli lo parlino e che riescano a comunicare e a sentirsi a proprio agio quando ogni estate andiamo in vacanza in Italia. Conoscere la lingua, le usanze e la cultura italiana è una parte integrante della nostra famiglia e della nostra identità”.

    S: “Voglio che Matteo parli e legga la lingua italiana e conosca la storia complicata del mio paese, non solo perché in Italia ha una nonna, zii e cugini con cui parlare, ma anche perché, tutto sommato, ha tanto da imparare anche dall’Europa”.

    Quando avete deciso di portare avanti in prima persona la battaglia per l’insegnamento della lingua italiana nelle scuole americane? Com’è nata l'idea di mobilitarvi?

    B: “Quando è stata ora di iscrivere i figli a scuola, ci siamo resi conto molto presto che a Manhattan non esistono risorse né quantitativamente né qualitativamente paragonabili a quelle di altre lingue. Quando l’anno scorso ho conosciuto Stefania, durante un meeting di un comitato di Ecologia nelle scuole del distretto 3, mi sono subito lasciata convincere da lei: dovevamo fare qualcosa per colmare questo vuoto”.

    S: “Infatti, per quanto ci riguarda, oltre al fatto di non avere altro modo se  non quello di parlare a nostro figlio in italiano a casa, ci si scontriamo anche con le differenze fra New York e il resto dei paesi anglofoni, alle cui culture siamo stati e continuiamo ad essere esposti. Sono stata sempre molto sensibile al tema delle barriere culturali che vengono a crearsi quando una famiglia si trasferisce in un posto come New York. 

    È vero che l’offerta è varia e vasta, ma è anche vero che lo è soprattutto per chi ha denaro da spendere. Dopo aver saputo che il DOE (Ministero dell’Istruzione Pubblica) offre la possibilità di un programma bilingue alla scuola pubblica, ho capito che le mie aspirazioni ad un’istruzione bilingue e multiculturale europea non erano poi così deliranti, e ho iniziato a informare le famiglie italiane dei propri diritti”.

    E lo sanno in pochi genitori ...

    S: “Da che sono qui, continuano ad arrivare famiglie dall’Italia che non sanno che il bilinguismo scolastico viene offerto a tutte le comunità linguistiche ELL (English Language Learners) che lo chiedono. Io vorrei riuscire a introdurre un doposcuola solido all’interno della scuola pubblica per i bambini che hanno perso l’occasione di frequentare un programma bilingue italiano”.

    Come vi siete organizzate?

    S: “La maggior parte del lavoro fatto per la causa dell’italiano a scuola lo abbiamo portato avanti incastrando i vari impegni scolastici a scuola dei nostri figli: ad esempio io, oltre che volontaria al giardino, sono bibliotecaria volontaria alla biblioteca scolastica. Inoltre, faccio parte della School Leadership Team e rappresento i non anglofoni della mia scuola nelle riunioni di distretto scolastico.

    C’è poi tutto il resto: casa, impegni personali, il lavoro indipendente. Quotidianamente io e Benedetta ci sentiamo per uno scambio di idee, trovare soluzioni o pianificare le successive tappe o urgenze. Il logo è stato disegnato da mia sorella che vive a Milano, seguendo una mia idea, e ricalcando lo stile dei disegni dei nostri bambini.

    Abbiamo voluto una cosa molto semplice che rappresentasse la diversità culturale italiana. Un gruppetto di mamme e papà videografi ci ha offerto di produrre un video (e che video!); un altro papà, pur non essendo nel nostro distretto, si è attivato a distribuire i nostri volantini; un’altra mamma a ritirare una grossa donazione di libri usati e in buone condizioni...penso di parlare anche a nome di Benedetta quando dico che la comunità delle famiglie italiane è un grande valore aggiunto al famoso ‘melting pot’ di New York”.

    Chi vi sta aiutando?  

    S: “Il nostro rappresentante ELL di distretto Lucas Liu e Teresa Arboleda (rappresentante per l’intera NYC) mi hanno aiutato molto, prima ancora che coinvolgessi Benedetta. Le due simpaticissime impiegate del DOE Cynthia Felix e Yalitza Vasquez si sono dimostrate subito entusiaste all’idea di introdurre l’italiano a scuola, e seguono i nostri progressi quotidianamente.

    Le molte famiglie italiane di recente immigrazione con figli in età prescolare; il nostro Consolato, che ha immediatamente mostrato interesse per questa iniziativa che sostiene completamente con donazioni di libri, incontri e, insieme allo IACE, con finanziamenti che possono essere spesi per risorse, laboratori informativi e di aggiornamento per gli insegnanti, borse di studio.

    Anche i rappresentanti delle altre comunità linguistiche, in particolare quella francese con Fabrice Jaumont e quella russa di Olga Ilyashenko, ci sostengono e ci incoraggiano a continuare questa battaglia. Vogliamo ringraziare anche te, Letizia, per l’ospitalità, Stefano Vaccara e Anthony Tamburri, la comunità italofona, We The Italians, l’ANSA, il Sole24Ore, il Resto del Carlino, e vari giornali locali della regione Emilia Romagna che hanno voluto dar voce al nostro appello”.

    Dove volete arrivare?

    S: “Riuscire a partire con un programma bilingue e un doposcuola in tante altre scuole pubbliche e, finalmente, dimostrare a tutti che la comunità italiana esiste, che vuole poter partecipare attivamente a quanto la società multiculturale di New York ha da offrire”.

    Quali sono gli ostacoli più grandi che avete incontrato e state incontrando?

    S: “Dopo l’intenso lavoro di ‘reclutamento famiglie’ svolto con successo nel giro di pochi mesi a partire da marzo, ora stiamo cercando insegnanti qualificati e certificati dallo Stato di New York. Il Department of Education impone requisiti molto rigidi per i candidati all’insegnamento nelle scuole pubbliche di New York ma, sotto la guida del Chancellor Carranza, che ha iniziato come studente bilingue la sua carriere scolastica, sta promuovendo l’apertura di diversi programmi bilingue. Per l’anno scolastico 2018-19 verranno creati ben 48 programmi in diverse lingue.

    Vista la scarsità di candidati con conoscenze di lingua italiana, la nostra scelta sta ricadendo su quei candidati con una solida conoscenza dell’italiano e che magari sono interessati ad acquisire le certificazioni dello stato di New York, piuttosto che puntare su quelli che invece sono già inseriti nel sistema, ma a cui mancano gli elementi fondamentali per insegnare un curriculum in lingua italiana”.

    E dulcis in fundo, parliamo del video con cui state pubblicizzando il vostro impegno. Com’è nato?

    S: “Il video è stato girato e montato da un papà e una mamma italiana (Luca Fantini e Veronica Diaferia Fantini) e l’idea è nata per promuovere il progetto del DL italiano nell’ambito di un picnic che abbiamo organizzato il 5 maggio a Central Park per incontrarci tutti di persona dopo esserci scambiati tante email e tanti messaggi su Facebook.

    L’evento è stato un gran successo e molte famiglie sono accorse da Manhattan, Brooklyn e Queens. Tra l’altro, ci è stato richiesto di organizzarne altri per rafforzare il legame tra la comunità italiana a New York e ci stiamo già mettendo in moto”.

    llaria Costa si dice ottimista: “Siamo molto fiduciosi ed ottimisti poiché sappiamo esserci un forte interesse da parte della autorità scolastiche di New York City verso i programmi bilingue, così come sappiamo di dover cogliere tale ‘momentum’ definito ‘ Rivoluzione Bilingue’ per realizzare il maggior numero possibile di DLP nei diversi quartieri della Città.

    Le sfide sono numerose (in particolare la formazione professionale dei docenti ed il reclutamento delle famiglie) ma confidiamo nella tenacia di genitori come Stefania e Benedetta per far aumentare questi promettenti Dual Language Program a New York ed offrire tale opportunità a molti dei nostri bambini.”

     

    ---

    Se siete interessati contattate  Benedetta e Stefania  via Facebook >>

  • Arte e Cultura

    Patrizia Di Carrobio. La vostra amica con la vita a gioiello

    Patrizia Di Carrobio non è solo amica per chi ha avuto la fortuna di incontrarla e starle vicino.  Lo è anche per chi la conosce solo attraverso i suoi libri che parlano di gioielli.

    La sua amicizia è infatti la prima gemma rara che potete trovare nel leggere i suoi scritti. Trapela infatti in ogni paragrafo. Con le sue parole vi prende per mano, vi guarda negli occhi, risponde alle vostre domande, sorride e riflette con voi.

    Questa sensazione di accompagnamento, di vicinanza, la si prova fin dalle prime pagine soprattutto nel suo ultimo libro, delizioso e piacevole viaggio personale nel mondo dei gioielli: 'Una vita a gioiello' (Polistampa, pp. 144, euro 14). Curato da Francesca Joppolo e illustrato da Marco Milanesi.

    Nata in Canada, ma con radici siciliane, Patrizia Di Carrobio ha vissuto a Bruxelles, Roma, Milano, Londra e New York. Ma non conosci bene Patrizia se non sai del suo legame atavico con la Sicilia.

    Pantelleria e Palermo sono sempre presenti nella sua vita.  Anche quando è a New York o in giro per il mondo. Lo sono nella musica che ascolta e fa ascoltare, nella sua cucina, nell’affetto per le sue figlie, nel suo modo di vestire, nel suo rapporto con l’arte ed il suo lavoro. Quando poi la vedi tornare abbronzata, dopo periodi di vacanza in Sicilia, incontri in lei la Sicilia fuori dalla Sicilia, con tutti i suoi colori.  

    La sua storia potrebbe essere perfetta come soggetto di un film. Tutto  comincia quando era bambina, con l’amore per i gioielli della nonna e poi con il ritrovamento di un brillante smarrito dai suoi genitori. Aveva solo sei anni, allora. Si laurea in Scienze Politiche ma la sua passione non è certo per la diplomazia. Diverrà presto una delle prime battitrici d’asta da Christie’s e poi Head of The Jewelry Department. Patrizia, da oltre  trent’anni, commercia con successo in gioielli e pietre preziose in tutto il mondo.

    A New York, la sua abitazione è diventata anche un punto di riferimento importante per il mondo dell’arte ed in particolare della musica. Dopo le sue figlie, i gioielli e la sua Sicilia, la musica è infatti una sua forte passione. Sempre più importante è il suo ruolo nel diffonderla attraverso piccoli concerti e la sua casa e’ diventata quasi una culla per musicisti di valore.

    Così attraverso il suo libro ‘Una vita a gioiello’ non possiamo che fare amicizia con lei. Con i suoi racconti, pillole da assaggiare piano piano,  ci parla di gioielli ma ci offre anche i suoi ricordi, commenti, sensazioni legati non solo al costume, alla moda e alla sua aneddotica. Ci parla di se’, dell’universo femminile e maschile, di storia, di cultura in tante sfaccettature.

    E’ un libro che può essere letto in piccole pause. Un libro da prendere e lasciare, poi riprendere, leggere nell’angolo della nostra casa dove prenderemmo un the piacevolmente con un’amica.

    Ne parlo così con lei, tra donne, proprio davanti ad un the, nella suo bellissimo appartamento di New York.  

    In ogni oggetto, dettaglio intorno a noi, una grande grazia, un’eleganza solare, mai presuntuosa o sfarzosa,  non convenzionale, piena di storia, che definirei teneramente italiana ed internazionale al tempo stesso.

    “Ho giá pubblicato due libri, entrambi in Italiano. Ho cominciato per un divorzio. Era il secondo. Mi sono resa conto allora che dipendeva da me se far prendere una brutta o una buona piega a quella drastica separazione. Divorziare può non essere la fine del mondo e un inizio di tante altre cose.”

    Così ecco la sua decisione di scrivere, ma certo non di divorzio.

    “Ne parlo con mia sorella, che mi dice di scrivere di gioielli e non del mio divorzio.  Passano mesi, vado a Palermo a visitare un’amica. Lei mi presenta una editor di Feltrinelli che si innamora del mio libro.  Dopo il primo scrivo anche il secondo libro. Tutto questo poi mi ha permesso di riscoprire l’Italia, i suoi luoghi, la lingua, dopo anni di lontananza”

    I due primi libri di Patrizia, subito in ristampa, sono stati un grande successo. Molti lettori hanno cominciato a conoscerla e incuriosirsi di lei.  “Mi sono detta però che avrei fatto un altro libro solo se poteva avere un’edizione inglese. E poi che lo avrei fatto insieme a qualcuno. E’ apparso un editore che ha detto che lo dovevo fare assolutamente e lo avrebbe pubblicato in due lingue…. Ecco ero obbligata a farlo. Francesca Joppolo lo ha curato."

    Come è strutturato  "Una vita a gioiello" - “Be Jewled”?  

    “Ogni capitolo parte da un gioiello o una pietra per poi arrivare a parlare di vita. Era quello che mi era stato chiesto dai miei lettori: condividere di più me stessa. Non è un libro solo sui gioielli, ma anche di vita, della mia vita. Una collana di perle e di capitoli che si inanellano per poi fare un libro.”

    'Una vita a gioiello' è curato con grande sensibilità  da Francesca Joppolo ed è sapientemente illustrato. Marco Milanesi ha disegnato anche Patrizia in tante vignette. E’ tratteggiata in una figura dai capelli neri, dotata di grande grazia, dolcezza, a volte di velata ironia. Sembra proprio di seguire Patrizia nella sua vita, attraverso questi disegni.  

    “Sono piccoli racconti in immagini, pillole che si affiancano a pillole scritte, secondo me funziona benissimo.” commenta Patrizia.

    Quando si dice “gioiello” si entra spesso in una dimensione frivola e superflua. Ma il tuo libro non è frivolo. Come mai?

    'Perchè io quando dico gioiello non dico frivolo.Il gioiello ci fa sentire belle e se ci sentiamo belle stiamo bene.  Se ci sentiamo bene sorridiamo e siamo aperte alla vita. Il gioiello, e lí forse entra il frivolo, puó essere un gioiello da 5 Euro o da milioni di Euro, ma all’effetto gioiello ci si puó arrivare lo stesso.

    Non è una questione di quanto costi. Io mi posso mettere un orecchino di alluminio o di un materiale più prezioso ed essere altrettanto felice. Ognuno mi può divertire in modo diverso. Ognuno ha un suo posto,  ma non è che uno mi fa più piacere dell’altro.

    In Africa, va ricordato, le donne si dipingono e poi si mettono i gioielli, che non hanno valore intrinseco. E poi non ci scordiamo che gli uomini nel passato portavano molti piú gioielli delle donne. Ma questo è un argomento che può portare a lunghe considerazioni“
     

    Per Patrizia vanno certo indossati gioielli preziosi, diamanti ma al tempo stesso anche gioielli contemporanei, di carta, plastica,  con materiali alternativi, spesso giocosi… E facile vedere come lei li indossa, magari insieme a preziosi più tradizionali. Lo fa con disinvoltura, con una sottile provocazione che invita chi la guarda a mettere in gioco la propria personalità, creatività  e capacità di seduzione.

    Hai già fatto tante presentazioni in Italia, da pochissimo qui New York. Il tuo libro ha da poco un'edizione inglese. Come sono andate? So che ami molto il contatto con chi ti legge...

    'Molto dipende dall’interlocutore, perchè io parlo sempre con qualcuno nelle mie presentazioni. È divertente, avendo sempre un interlocutore diverso, il risultato cambia. Poi anche la platea è diversa. Per esempio a Bologna ho fatto la presentazione in una libreria. A Palermo in un conservatorio.

    Non leggiamo un passo del libro, ma prendiamo spunto dal libro per parlare di cose di vita. Puo’ essere come indossi un gioiello in vacanza o come fai a divorziare serenamente. Sono temi diversi che comunque hanno un filo conduttore nel libro.

    Quello che mi ha fatto molto piacere è che anche a Palermo, dove la gente tende a parlarti sopra, sono riuscita a creare  silenzio, attenzione. Poi tante domande. Penso che quello dico interessi molto. Poi certo è importante fare presentazioni brevi. La gente si annoia e si stanca."

    Ma raccontaci del tuo lavoro... 

    "Faccio la commerciante di gioielli e pietre preziose. Compro e vendo, ma non compro mai per un cliente in particolare. Compro perchè secondo me vale e poi vendo. Certo a volte a volte nel corso di  un mese, a volte in un anno e a volte anche 10 anni.

    Ma oggi cosa è un gioiello secondo te?

    "It’s an adornment. Un ornamento. Un complemento importante al vestiario. Ma non solo. Ha un valore che va al di là del valore. E poi quali sono le cose nel mondo che tu compri e ti danno piacere, ti fanno sentire bene e quando le compri ne rimane il valore?"

    Esistono regole nell’indossare i gioielli?

    "Nessuna regola! Dipende da come si indossano, da come ci sente.. Una collana importante può andare anche su di un maglione e viceversa, gli orecchini di carta possono essere perfetti su di un abito da sera."

    Dunque il gioiello non è solo un gioiello. E’ quasi un sentimento ...

    "Vero. Il gioiello ti ricorda anche di momenti e di persone. Il rapporto di ogni donna per esempio con i propri gioielli ha anche un profondo valore simbolico e sentimentale. E’ legato a riti della nostra vita..."

    Colgo una piccola nota personale in questa risposta. Nel libro racconti che ti sei sposata due volte senza un anello di fidanzamento!

    “Vero. E’ successo. La prima volta non ci tenevo. La seconda ho ricevuto una collana.”

    E Patrizia, soprattutto con questo suo ultimo libro è molto attiva anche sui social network.

    “Per me è una piacevole scoperta. In 4/5 anni, da quando è uscito il mio ultimo libro, sono cambiate tante cose. La rete è importante oggi. E per una persona come me non è facile da capire, ma mi sto facendo aiutare. Il racconto in pillole con immagini sta funzionando molto bene e molti mi scrivono, mi pongono domande.”

    Questo perchè anche sui i social, anche in un luogo dove dice di non capire bene, Patrizia si presenta come un’amica. Accompagna la vita di tutti i giorni, senza fingere, con post che parlano di preziosi e non solo.  Il segreto di Patrizia è proprio nella sua naturalezza, eleganza senza tempo, nell’essere inconfondibilmente se stessa.

    Aprite quindi ‘Una vita a gioiello’ o  “Be Jewled” , come se fosse uno scrigno e fatevi sedurre da ogni pagina in un viaggio nel tempo e al di là del tempo.

     

     

     

  • Life & People

    Linda Carlozzi. An Extraordinary Italian American Woman

    Both of Linda’s parents are from Campodipietra, a small village in the Province of Campobasso, Molise. Her mother and all of her siblings were born in the United States but the family returned to Campodipietra when her mother was just 11 months old. Linda’s dad instead was born and raised there and that’s where he were to meet her mom. He left his entire family in Italy to marry her and they came back to the US in 1953 to build their family here.

    But the family split didn’t last too long. In the late 1960’s her father’s brother, sister-in-law and their two children came and joined them in the US. This is how the Carlozzis’ American journey begun. “Ours was a very tight knit family,” Linda tells me. “Our holidays, baptisms, communions and graduations were all celebrated ‘Italian-style,’ surrounded by family and delicious Italian food—homemade, of course!”

    You grew up in New Britain, CT. Did you live in an Italian neighborhood?

    Absolutely! New Britain was heavily populated with Italians and Polish immigrants. Many immigrants from Campo di pietra moved to New Britain and neighboring towns, and our neighbors were paesani too! Our neighbor’s mother was a woman named Angela Maria.

    Because my mother worked as a seamstress andI was the last of three children, Angela Maria would take care of me after school. She was very much like my nonna and spoke only dialect. As you can imagine,

    I quickly learned to speak Italian dialect from Campodipietra. In fact I think I may have spoken dialect before I spoke English. I learned so much about Italy and our family from Angela Maria. She lived to be 102 years old; she looked like the most beautiful befana and told me the most wonderful stories about Campodipietra. She also taught me to crochet, something I still enjoy today.

    And when you went to college, didn’t you risk losing that connection to your roots? Not really. Actually, it wasn’t until my college years that I really connected with my Italian family! I went to Fordham University, and there I met so many friends who grew up as I did—first generation Italian Americans.

    I felt very much at home at Fordham. I decided to major in communications and minor in Italian studies. My father told me, “If you think you know the Italian language and this will be easy for you—you are wrong. You speak dialect, not Italian, and the language is not an easy one.” My father was right, of course, but I set out to prove to him that I could do it. And I managed to convince my parents that I should take the Fordham  

    Language course in Italy over the summer. It was 1983 and that trip changed the trajectory of my life. Meeting my family in Italy for the first time and seeing Rome, Tuscany, the Amalfi Coast and Campobasso left an indelible mark on me. I devoured every square foot of this magnificent country, my parent’s patria. After that, I went back to Italy as often as I could.  

    So that’s when you ‘became’ Italian. But you are also American of course. What is it like to have a dual identity? And how much does this affect your daily life? Well, being Italian American affects every fiber of my being. My parents were fiercely proud of their Italian heritage. When the laws changed, allowing dual citizenship, my father was quick to regain his Italian citizenship. I suspect to an Italian, there is no question that I am American.

    Yet to my friends and me, there is no question that I am Italian. Being Italian American is 99% of my daily life. So much of what I do has been influenced by my ethnicity, from my interests to my friends to my involvement in the Italian American community and even to my clients, many of whom are Italian. I feel truly blessed to bridge both worlds and to understand the cultural differences and the nuances of both worlds.  

    You currently sit on NIAF’s board of directors. When did you first find out about the organization and how did it become so important to you? Soon after my trip to Italy, I became very involved in Italian American organizations. At Fordham University, I was a founding member of a young Italian-American organization called FIERI. I also became involved in the National Organization of Italian American Women (“NOIAW”).

    Then I went to Catholic University Law School in Washington, DC, where NIAF is headquartered. I was one of the first recipients of an NIAF Law Scholarship and I worked as an intern in the NIAF offices. But it wasn’t until I moved to Philadelphia in 1991 that things really took off. There, I was fortunate to meet Matthew DiDomenico, a successful businessman who was on the Board of NIAF; he became my mentor and sponsor and remains my friend to this day. He is largely responsible for my nomination to the NIAF Board of Directors.  

    The world of Italian-American organizations has long been dominated by men. At least in the past. What was it like to be a woman at NIAF? It has been a challenge for women in many Italian American organizations and I am not sure how to explain that. But I think NIAF was at the forefront early on. Very influential women sat on its board, beginning with Geraldine Ferraro, Matilda Cuomo, Nancy Pelosi, Patricia de Stacy Harrison and Maria Bartiromo. One of my mentors on the NIAF Board was Judge Marie Garibaldi, who recently passed away, sadly. She was the first woman named to the Supreme Court of New Jersey.  

    Official Italian-American organizations have had an increasingly difficult time reaching out to young people. Do you think your children, grandchildren or other young Italian Americans in your family are interested in cultivating their dual identity? What can NIAF do to get closer to them, to get them more involved? It’s true. The children of second and third generation Italian Americans are more removed from their Italian heritage. But I think NIAF has some wonderful programs to cultivate young people. NIAF’s “Voyage of Discovery” program seeks to strengthen young Italian Americans sense of identity by creating bonds between them and the culture and heritage of Italy.

    Students selected are offered the opportunity to visit Italy for two weeks. I have met some ofthe students who have traveled to Italy on this program. They are excited to visit the country and energized by all that Italy offers.  

    In your opinion, has Americans’ perceptions of Italian-American culture changed over the years? How is it seen today with respect to the past?

    Stereotypes persist; I experienced them firsthand as a student and a young lawyer. However, as a community we have made great strides in presenting positive images of our culture, and NIAF has been at the forefront of that effort. But I believe there is still much work to be done.

    The recent attacks on the Columbus Day celebrations are one glaring example of the erosion of our culture. Italo-American organizations need to work together to promote a positive image of Italian-American culture.  

    Neither have Italians in Italy always had an easy relationship with Italian Americans. What do we need to do to get these two Italian worlds separated by an ocean to better engage one another? I think stereotypes of Italian Americans play a significant role in the perceptions Italians have of Italian Americans. The many Italians who immigrated to the US in the 1940s-60s brought the Italy they knew with them.

    Yet Italy is a very different country today. We grew up with parents who held onto the older culture and my cousins in Italy grew up very differently. Therein lies the difference. We need to work harder to promote dialogue between these “two Italian nations” and, once again, promote a positive image of Italian Americans. I think the media plays a large role in bridging such divides.  

    What’s in store for NIAF? Are there projects you’re particularly attached to?

    NIAF is on the precipice of big change. Our President, John Viola, brings passion, energy and youth to NIAF. He has bold new ideas and he is steadfastly committed to ushering NIAF into the next generation.

    We are already seeing the impact of his changes. Like John, I am committed to bringing young people into the fold, to share with them my love and passion for our rich culture and history. Personally, I am especially committed to the scholarship program that I myself benefited from as a student.  

    Any dreams in your pocket?

    I want to see the first woman (not me!) elected to Chair of NIAF. I believe that day is right around the corner.

  • Enrico Colavita
    Fatti e Storie

    Molise. “C’è da lavorare, non da disperare”

    La nostra conversazione comincia quando è “solo” Presidente di Confindustria Molise. Ancora non si sapeva della sua candidatura. La sua agenda era piena di impegni aziendali, e associativi, non certo politici.  Che fare, ora che si è dimesso per correre per il Senato da indipendente del centrosinistra? Cancellare tutto e ripetere l’intervista?  Ma rileggendo le sue risposte mi rendo conto che basterà qualche domanda in più alla fine. Enrico Colavita è un uomo con un volto solo, non uno che cambia a seconda dell’opportunità politica. Quello che aveva detto prima è ancora tutto valido.
     

    DA SANT’ELIA A PIANISI PARTE UN’AZIENDA FAMILIARE CHE OGGI HA UN FATTURATO DI 180 MILIONI NEL MONDO

    Dunque,  Enrico Colavita, classe ’45, Cavaliere della Repubblica, Presidente della Colavita Spa -  impresa agroalimentare presente in tutto il mondo - per due volte già Presidente degli industriali molisani si racconta in quel modo schietto che lo contraddistingue.

    L’azienda nata grazie a Giovanni e Felice Colavita nel 1938 a Sant’Elia a Pianisi, in provincia di Campobasso, è oggi un colosso mondiale con un fatturato di 180 milioni di Euro. E ciò nonosrante, era e rimane un’azienda familiare.

    E lo è anche negli Stati Uniti, dove è diventata un’icona del Made in Italy e un pioniere di quella che oggi si chiama, internazionalizzzione. Tutto parte infatti da un episodio familiare. Nel 1978, durante il suo viaggio di nozze, il giovane Enrico conosce John Profaci, uomo d’affari italo-americano e capostipite di una famiglia che manteneva a distanza un forte legame con il territorio di origine. Una stretta di mano e nasce la Colavita USA, quasi il sigillo simbolico di un modo ostinatamente familiare di fare azienda: da una parte lui con il fratello Leonardo, dall'altra John Profaci. E ancora oggi, tutta la famiglia lavora insieme, da entrambe le sponde dell’Atlantico.

    Parte così quarant’anni fa quella che allora era una vera  scommessa: oltreoceano non si aveva idea di cosa fosse la dieta mediterranea, nè s’era mai sentito parlare di Olio Extra Vergine di Oliva.

    Questa intuizione lo ha portato a svolgere un ruolo importante nel mondo e non solo per la sua di azienda. Gli ha consentito di avere esperienze ed aperture culturali che pochi hanno potuto avere. Questo è particolarmente importante dall’osservatorio americano da cui gli parlo. 
     

    ENRICO COLAVITA E CONFINDUSTRIA

    Ci racconta i suoi primi passi nella più grande realtà associativa degli industriali italiani, Confindustria.

    “Sono stato presidente di Confindustria Molise tra il i ‘95  ed il ‘98 e poi tra il  2003 e 2005. Il Molise viveva una stagione di ottimismo, attraeva investimenti anche da aziende multinazionali. La Fiat andava bene. Sembrava ci fossero buone prospettive di sviluppo, per la nostra piccola regione, nonostante le risorse limitate. C’era anche una grande speranza per il turismo.  Io ero stato anche presidente delle camere di commercio e questo era molto utile. Avevamo inventato un marchio 'Piacere Molise' che nel logo aveva una farfalla. 'Accoglienza cortese' era lo slogan.

    Poi invece arrivò l’ondata della crisi. C’erano stati investimenti importanti, per esempio nella  produzione di barbabietole da zucchero e nell’allevamento del pollame. Ma dopo alcuni anni lo zucchero divenne una produzione limitata e controllata dalla Comunità Europea, e non c’era la quota per il Molise, mentre l’impresa veronese che aveva investito nella pollicoltura fallì.

    Nel 2010 poi le difficoltà coincisero con una fase di crisi più generale.  Il Molise che era già debole, è affondato economicamente. Molti giovani se ne andarono. Perdevamo risorse umane.”

    Perchè dunque a fine 2017 Enrico decide di tornare a Confindustria?

    “Racconto una cosa. Qualche giorno fa ho fatto due incontri nelle aree industriali. Quella interna di Venafro e sulla costa di Termoli. Sono aree con grosse possibilità. Nel nord Italia, dove l’economia si è ripresa, incontri difficoltà che qui paradossalmente non ci sono. In Veneto non trovi uno spazio, un capannone in una zona comoda, in una  pianura, con una strada, neanche a pagarlo a peso d’oro. A Termoli, invece, trovi un’immensa zona industriale con alcune grandi imprese tra cui la stessa FIAT.  Ci sono capannoni vuoti sull’autostrada, sulla costa. Insomma ci sono le condizioni per attrarre investimenti. Il potenziale rimane.”
     

    PAROLA D’ORDINE: INTERNAZIONALIZZARE IL MOLISE

    Attrarre investimenti anche dall’estero… è vitale per una regione così. Cosa serve, secondo Enrico Colavita?

    “Ad esempio una politica di marketing  territoriale, come la stanno facendo il Veneto e la Toscana. La regione certo è piccola, le infrastrutture nuove non ci sono, ma la parte più pianeggiante, sulla costa, ha ferrovia, l’autostrada, ed è vicino ai porti. Poi c’è l’agricoltura, che è il settore primario in Molise. Si è sviluppata molto la viticoltura.  C’èda lavorare, insomma, non c’è da disperare.”

    E’ un lavoro con i piedi per terra quello che propone Enrico Colavita. Un percorso di piccoli-grandi passi.

     

    LA CHIAVE DEL SUCCESSO: FARE RETE

    Oggi si parla molto di reti d’impresa. Il Presidente delle Reti d’Impresa di Confindustria Nazionale, Antonello Montante,  sta facendo un grande lavoro in questa direzione. Per una regione come il Molise portare le proprie piccole e medie imprese a “fare rete” potrebbe essere vitale….

    “Infatti, abbiamo avuto recentemente un meeting con Confindustria proprio per le reti d’impresa, per spiegare il concetto alle aziende. Ho riunito quelle del comparto agro-alimentare. L’idea è di ripartire proprio da loro, ma non singolarmente con un prodotto. Occorre presentare le nostre eccellenze attraverso una selezione dei generi più vari, metterli insieme e portarli in giro, raccontando anche la capacità e bellezza del territorio che li produce. Pasta e olio, il grano, i  tartufi , il vino e altro ancora,  tutto insieme.”

    Un lavoro in cui proprio Enrico Colavita è stato un pioniere nel corso degli anni, sia come presidente della Camera di commercio del Molise, sia con la sua stessa azienda, che ha utilizzato la propria capacità di distribuzione nel mondo per far conoscere molti altri marchi, non solo i propri.

    “Certo il lavoro cominciato con la Camera di commercio si è allargato nel tempo. Siamo stati in grado di avviare la distribuzione su tanti mercati. Qualche decina d’anni fa fondai il consorzio Molise export alimentare,  primo consorzio mono settoriale del Mezzogiorno. Sono successe tante cose da allora. Oggi la nostra rete nel mondo è cresciuta ed il potenziale di accesso anche.

    Dunque Colavita grazie al lavoro di distribuzione della sua azienda, ha svolto un ruolo nell’internazionalizzazione di marchi che sarebbero rimasti chiusi nel luogo di origine...

    “I nostri distributori, tramite i nostri contatti, fanno già rete; la difficoltà sta nel mettere insieme tante piccole realtà e accompagnarle in USA, Australia, Brasile, Giappone...

    Per fortuna ci sono molti giovani su cui possiamo contare. Anni fa era molto più difficile. E poi oggi ci aiuta molto la tecnologia”.

     

    L’IMPEGNO PER IL SUO MOLISE

    Ma torniamo in Molise, un territorio senza uguali.

    “Infatti. Il Molise può proporre un turismo autentico. Abbiamo 140 paesi, quasi tutti borghi. Moltissimi sono carini, hanno una storia notevole e costano pochissimo. Bagnoli del Trigno, Fossalto, Castellino del Biferno, Oratino, Castelpetroso, Vastogirardi, Riccia, Pescopennataro… Sono tantissimi. E a Natale, in molti di questi vengono allestiti presepi viventi davvero suggestivi...”

    Questi borghi tra l’altro stanno oggi entrando nel circuito dell’offerta turistica.

    “Si, la nostra proposta alberghiera si sta evolvendo. Stiamo rilanciando progetti di ‘albergo diffuso’ nei borghi, nelle residenze private dove si vive in pieno l’atmosfera del nostro Molise. E cresce anche la realtà del bed and breakfast, dell’ agriturismo. Sono proposte perfette per far risaltare la tipicità della regione. Non aspettatevi il grande albergo, ma avrete lo stesso un’accoglienza indimenticabile. Per non parlare della possibilità di degustare prodotti introvabili altrove... se capiti nella stagione del tartufo bianco -  tra ottobre e dicembre - è fantastico”

    Il Molise pronto al rilancio turistico come Basilicata e la sua Matera?
    “Siamo molto simili. Abbiamo la possibilità di fare un percorso analogo nel turismo per farci conoscere al mondo intero."

    Ma perchè Enrico Colavita, imprenditore di successo a livello internazionale, fa tutto questo?

    “Perchè ho esperienza, conosco tanti ambienti e so che posso dare una mano.  Vedere  felici i miei conterranei per me è molto gratificante. Voglio dare il mio contributo.”

    E lo fa anche con piccole azioni.  “Qualche giorno fa ho accompagnato due piccole aziende in banca per presentarle. Per avere l’attenzione che meritano. Si trattava di produzione artigianale.  Pasta e ceramica,  progetti di investimento piccoli ma interessanti. Poi è passato un amico. Lo conosco da quaranta anni. Non è un nostro distributore, vive a Londra e lavora con prodotti molisani. Mi ha invitato all’apertura di un albergo che ha aperto a Capracotta per invitare i suoi amici londinesi. Certo che ci vado. Andare ad una inaugurazione così è molto più gratificante che al Westin, no?”
     

    ITALIANI NEL MONDO

    Ed il suo rapporto con gli italiani all’estero? Li conosce bene… come pochi. E li avvicina sempre con quel calore umano che fa parte del suo modo di essere.

    “Li ho frequentati come imprenditore, come presidente delle camera di commercio. Voglio dire che sostengo da sempre, come Piero Bassetti, l’importanza delle camere di commercio all’estero. Credo che la presenza “italica” nel mondo -- come la chiama lui -- sia fondamentale.”

    Eppure la loro realtà è ancora poco conosciuta in Italia… anche quella di grandi associazioni come la NIAF, National Italian American Foundation.

    “La Niaf è molto sottostimata nel nostro Paese, eppure dovrebbe essere un punto di riferimento per l’intero Sistema Italia. Con i suoi importanti associati, politici e imprenditori, professionisti e scienziati, artisti e giornalisti, dovrebbero essere un nodo vitale per noi. Ma in Italia spesso viene addirittura snobbata dalle nostre autorità’. E se chiedi chi conosce la NIAF nel nostro Paese, forse uno su un milione ne ha sentito parlare.

    E’ un grande errore, non ci rendiamo conto del potenziale di queste presenze in giro per il mondo! Torno a Piero Bassetti, condivido molto il suo manifesto, che parla di 'italici nel mondo'. E noi non ce ne curiamo!

    Così si concludeva la mia prima conversazione con Enrico Colavita. Ero soddisfatta: sono rare le interviste telefoniche che riescono a trasmettere anche la solarità di chi ti parla.  Ma qualche giorno dopo, mentre stendevo il testo, apprendo della sua candidatura al Senato. Non mi meraviglia, visto l’impegno e la passione che aveva dimostrato. Ma decido di richiamarlo per un approfondimento.

     

    LA POLITICA, PERCHE’?

    Come mai Enrico Colavita, appena avviato a riprendere l’esperienza con Confindustria, ha deciso di candidarsi?

    “E’ andata così. Mi chiamano e mi dicono: ‘Abbiamo bisogno di un candidato che aggreghi, che sia distaccato dai partiti, abbiamo fatto il tuo nome…’  ‘Ma chi vi ha autorizzato!?’ Ho risposto io, di getto. Ma poi ripensandoci… proprio questo recente ritorno a Confindustria è stato determinante per farmi dire sì. Tutte le aziende che avevo cominciato a rivedere … Quel mondo ha bisogno di una politica diversa … E allora che faccio? La politica mi chiama e dico no?”.

    In passato aveva detto di no a simili proposte. Cosa è cambiato questa volta? E cosa pensa della politica, oggi?
    “Allora era presto, e non avevo giovani pronti a sostituirmi in azienda. Ora ho parlato con loro, e mi hanno detto tutti: ‘Lo devi fare, papà!’, ‘Lo devi fare, zio!’ Di politica sono sempre stato un appassionato. Ho studiato 'Scienze politiche' con maestri come Giovanni Spadolini,  Giovanni Sartori, Giorgio La Pira …  Ma ormai non credo più alle costruzioni ideologiche. Penso che il mio contributo possa essere di tipo progettuale, amministrativo, applicando la mia esperienza di imprenditore...”

    Essere conosciuto anche nel mondo imprenditoriale all’estero è importante secondo lei?

    “Certo, soprattutto quando si parla di promozione del brand Italia. Conosco già quel palcoscenico.  So come muovermi. L’ho fatto per decenni. Posso davvero dare una mano."

    E ritorna su Confindustria alla fine.  Ci tiene proprio. Non deve essere stato facile per lui lasciare l’incarico intrapreso da pochissimo.

    “Ho un ottimo rapporto con Confindustria. Voglio dirlo. Non l’abbandono anche se non saro’ più presidente. E’ importante per la mia regione, per l’Italia di tutto il Sud”.

     

  • Fiorella Mannoia vicino il Madison Square Garden
    Arte e Cultura

    Con la combattente Fiorella Mannoia

    Ho avuto la fortuna di intervistarla già per la televisione a New York, tre anni fa. Era a ridosso di un concerto insieme a Zucchero al Madison Square Garden. Lei si è raccontata come artista, ma soprattutto come donna. Ricordo che rimasi colpita dalla sua generosità, semplicità e soprattutto dall’impatto che era riuscita ad avere su chi non la conosceva e l’ascoltava.  Fiorella Mannoia è prima di tutto una donna molto schietta ed umana, questo non sfugge a nessuno.

    Appena saputo del suo nuovo concerto, previsto per  fine di febbraio, non potevo - sperando poi di riprendere la conversazione anche davanti ad una telecamera - che chiamarla. E nel corso della telefonata, anche se a grande distanza mentre lei si trova in Brasile, mi accorgo quasi subito di farlo da donna a donna.

    La giornalista scompare, Fiorella riesce ancora a trasportarmi in una dimensione di grande confidenza. Ma non c’è da meravigliarsi. E’ proprio nel suo tono schietto, rassicurante e confidenziale uno dei segreti del suo successo.  Soprattutto con le donne che la seguono da anni.  La sua voce accompagna le loro vite.  In particolare una canzone "Quello che le donne non dicono", scritta da Enrico Ruggeri, che lei interpreta magistralmente,  diventata quasi un inno da cantare insieme. 

    Quindi parleremo di America, di musica, ma anche delle inquietudini che attraversano questi giorni, del Sud, di Pino Daniele, delle donne di tutte le età, dei giovani e la musica, dei nostri sogni, di #Metoo…

    C’è grande sintonia fin dall’inizio, quando le chiedo cosa rappresenta per lei l’America, la sua  risposta è la stessa che io darei….

    “La musica, il cinema e tutto quello che ha a che fare con lo spettacolo, che poi è diventato il nostro punto di riferimento. Poi gli anni 70 e tutti i movimenti di quel periodo. La letteratura americana che mi ha accompagnato, con Jack Kerouac, John Fante, Steinbeck …..  L’America per me significa questa roba qui, i film, i libri e le canzoni che hanno fatto parte della mia formazione…”

    La riporto nel suo Paese. Di cosa si sente orgogliosa come italiana? E sempre come italiana cosa la mette a disagio?

    “Io mi sento orgogliosa soprattutto quando giro tutta l’Italia, quest’anno ho fatto cento concerti in tutte le cittá immaginabili. Mi sento orgogliosa ogni qualvolta in una cittá  mi guardo intorno e ho la percezione di stare nel paese piu bello del mondo.

    In questa linguetta di terra abbiamo la piu grande concentrazione d’arte di tutto il pianeta. Abbiamo una ricchezza paesaggistica che va dalle Alpi all’Africa quasi. Mi guardo intorno e dico Quanta Storia! Quanta storia  abbiamo attorno, alla quale noi non facciamo neanche caso. Viviamo in una delle terre piu belle del mondo e questo ogni volta mi fa sentire orgogliosa.

    Invece non mi sento orgogliosa quando non capisco come facciano a non far vivere il nostro Paese di turismo con tutte le bellezze che abbiamo. Questo mi fa davvero arrabbiare. Il fatto che non curino nostri patrimoni artistici, il fatto che si deturpino le spiagge, il fatto che costruiscano dove non si deve, il fatto che trivellino davanti a dei posti incantati. Cerchiamo petrolio in mare, quando il nostro petrolio sono le nostre isole. Abbiamo alcune delle isole piu belle del mondo e non riusciamo a valorizzarle.

    Mi addolora che non si investa come si deve sulla cultura, che non si investa sull’arte, che non si investa sulla scuola.”

    Il Sud, anche in Italia, vive una dimensione di grande fragilità. Tu hai il meridione del mondo nel cuore. Hai  fatto un disco stupendo che si chiama ‘Sud’.  Ha poi portato avanti diverse campagne sui diritti umani, ed in particolare quelli delle donne.

    “Vero. Il mio istitinto mi porta al SUD. Non che non mi piaccia il Nord, ma amo il Sud. Per questo ho fatto anche un disco in cui ho cercato di avvalermi della collaborazione  di tanti musicisti, Africani, Sud Americani.”

    Il temine Sud si affianca facilmente alla parola emigrante. Anche questo è un tema che ha seguito con grande intensità….

    “Nel concerto di New York, canterò ‘In Viaggio’, una canzone che ho scritto appunto per tutti quelli che vanno via dal proprio paese, con tutte le raccomandazioni che una madre avrebbe fatto alla propria figlia.”

    Lasciare il proprio Paese, la propria terra ma anche i propri cari, e’ un vissuto che attraversa trasversalmente il mondo. Un’esperienza che ha una dimensione umana e personale, non solo socio-politica. Fiorella lo racconta.

    “Io non ho mai avuto figlio però non penso sia necessario essere madre per sentirsi madre, quello è un istinto che abbiamo tutte. Ed immagino perfettamente cosa vuol per una madre lasciar andare un figlio lontano in un Paese sconosciuto.”

    Sei l’interprete italiana più vicina e amata dalle donne, come donna oltre che cantante. Qualsiasi sia l’eta’ di chi ti ascolta. Forse perchè hai sempre un modo di vedere giovane. Quale è il tuo segreto?

    ‘Partiamo dal presupposto che io non credo nella vecchiaia. La vecchiaia non esiste, è solo uno stato mentale. Il corpo invecchia, ma con quello ci devi fare i conti, le ossa cominciano a non essere elastiche come prima, la forza non è piu quella di una volta, ma la testa non puó invecchiare.

    La testa invecchia se tu ti senti vecchio, se non ti senti piu parte di questa realtá, se non sei piu curioso, se non hai piu voglia di giocare o di metterti in gioco. La vecchiaia è un'invenzione.

    E spesso le donne si sentono vecchie prima del tempo. A 40 anni giá pensano di non essere più belle come una volta, pensano che ormai stanno appendendo il cappello al chiodo. Non è vero, è tutta una bugia!! C’è sempre una stagione e ogni stagione è meravigliosa, anche quella piu avanzata come la mia. “

    'Come si cambia' di Maurizio Piccoli e Renato Pareti. E' titolo di un'altra tua canzone famosa.  Le donne sentono nell’arco della loro vita sulla loro pelle cosa significhi cambiare. Ci sono fasi delicate. Come si fa a cambiare rimanendo sempre se stesse? E’ facile oggi vedere trasformazioni di donne che diventano irriconoscibili...

    ‘Io in aprile avró 64 anni e non me li sento, nella mia testa me ne sento 30, 20 o anche meno! Bisogna accettare il tempo che passa e non ricorrere a certi trucchi estetici grotteschi. C’è un modo per rimanere in forma ecc. Ma non bisogna cambiare I connotati.

    E da dove viene tanta vitalità?

    Quando mi appassiono alla realtà che mi circonda, anche se mi arrabbio, mi sento viva. L’eta la sento solo quando non riesco piu a fare un movimento che prima riuscivo a fare, ma questo è normale.

    Parliamo di #Metoo. Da un lato  Oprah Winfrey ai Golden Globe, dall'altra un gruppo di donne francesi guidate da l'attrice Catherine Deneuve. Cosa ne pensi?

    Penso che la veritá sia nel mezzo come sempre. Credo che questa denuncia è stata rivoluzionaria e tutte le rivoluzioni si tirano dietro come un’onda qualsiasi cosa di bello e di brutto. Io penso che bisogna  combattere l’abuso di potere e tralasciare le stupidaggini. Se dobbiamo elencare tutte le volte che qualcuno maldestramente ha cercato di provarci ognuna di noi scriverebbe un libro.

    L’abuso di potere va sempre denunciato.

    La violenza è violenza, lo stupro è stupro. Se ci sono stati abusi di potere per estorcere, quelli vanno denunciati sicuramente. Non bisogna fare confusione pero’.

    Non dimentichiamo che ci sono tante donne che non fanno le attrici, che subiscono discriminazioni di cui ancora la cultura maschile è intrisa.

    “Vero tutte queste donne che hanno denunciato sono donne che hanno possibilità economiche, ma le realtà più difficili sono quelle sommerse nelle fabbriche, negli uffici con  donne costrette a sopportare le avances sgangherate dei loro datori di lavoro o peggio.

    Se ci sono stati abusi di potere per estorcere, quelli vanno denunciati subito.”

    Parliamo della maternità. Per tornare alla musica. Hai prima ricordato di (In viaggio) dove ti rivolgi a un’ipotetica figlia. Parliamo di donne che non hanno potuto avere figli. Come me, come te. Questo vuol dire che non abbiamo lo stesso la possibilità di esternare il nostro senso materno nella nostra vita?

    “Noi siamo tutte mamme. Io quando introduco questa canzone ‘Il viaggio’ durante il  concerto, lo dico sempre. Questa canzone mi ha dato tante soddisfazioni. L’ho scritta mentre aspettavo di incidere Sud, dopo i racconti che i musicisti africani mi hanno fatto.

    Ho domandato  sempre loro delle loro madri, dove stavano, quanto tempo dopo avevano saputo che i loro figli erano arrivati vivi.  E per quelli deceduti come erano state avvertite le madri.  Cosa deve provare una madre quando vede un figlio andar via...

    Ho preso carta e penna e mi sono messa a scrivere….

    Non so come ho fatto, ma mi sono arrivate tante e-mail di tante mamme e genitori che mi dicevano “grazie” perchè sono le parole che avrei tanto potuto dire a mia figlia e non ho avuto nè il coraggio nè trovato le parole giuste per dirlo.

    Ed è curioso che queste parole siano state scritte da una donna che figli non ha avuti. Ma io penso che non sia necessario essere madri di fatto, per sentirsi madri, perche sta nella natura, noi siamo nate madri.

    Hai lavorato con grandi autori come Enrico Ruggeri, Ivano Fossati, Ron, Cocciante, Piero Fabrizi, Daniele Silvestri, Avion Travel e Gian Maria Testa …  Quanto è importante sentirsi vicina a chi scrive un testo?

    Essere interprete è un po come essere traduttore, è una grande responsabilità ’. Immagina Pavese quando ha tradotto Moby Dick in italiano, che responsabilità  si è preso. Quando ti impadronisci di parole degli altri, te ne assumi una bella responsabilità . Il traduttore deve tradire il meno possibile, e anche l’interprete. Tu ti prendi delle parole le fai tue, le studi, le capisci, le interpreti, e poi con la tua voce cerchi di dare un valore aggiunto e cerchi sempre di non fare danni. E questo ho fatto io in tutti questi anni.”

    E poi hai scritto tu stessa. Cosa ha significato per te. Quanto è diverso...

    “Scrivere, invece, è un’altra cosa. Cantare le tue parole è completamente un’altra cosa, perche le parole non le devi interpretare, tu le conosci, sai perche hai scritto quella parola, cosa voleva dire, e cosa ti ha spinto a scrivere quella frase. Cantare le proprie parole è tutta un’altra cosa.

    Mi piace scrivere ma spero di mantenermi lucida per avere sempre quel senso critico per valutare quello che scrivo, nello stesso modo in cuii giudico quello degli altri.”  

    Quanto pensi che la musica possa aiutare questo mondo?

    “La musica è sempre stato lo specchio della realtá che ci ha circondato. Le canzoni vivono della contemporaneitá del momento storico ma cosi’ come il cinema, la letteratura etc.  Noi non dobbiamo mai avere la pretesa di cambiare il mondo con le nostre canzoni , guai, solo accarezzare l’idea ti fa avere questa presunzione.

    Io non penso di cambiare niente, io penso che tanti si possano riconoscere in quello che dico come se fosse un sentire collettivo. Spero almeno che quello che canto sia condiviso, e possiamo sentirci meno soli perche quella determinata canzone o quel determinato cantante mi rappresenta.

    Questa è la missione della musica, non c’è pretesa di cambiare nulla, non abbiamo mai cambiato nulla la veritá è questa.”

    Cosa ti fa più male di questo mondo?

    “Mi fa male questa scarsa attenzione per la cultura, per la scuola.  Questa distruzione della scuola, questa distruzione del corpo insegnante…non so cosa ci sia dietro ma mi fa paura.  Questo considerare la cultura una roba da vecchi, che non serve piu; il linguaggio si è affievolito, nelle canzoni non ci sono piu metafore. C’è peró una fascia di giovani che ne ha voglia. “

    Cosa possono aspettarsi giovani cantanti dalla musica? Credi ci sia ancora spazio per i più autentici e bravi come te.

    “Noi abbiamo fatto un percorso che a loro è stato precluso. Anche per quelli che escono dai talent.  Non hanno quel percorso che abbiamo fatto noi, con cui ci siamo costruiti, aumentando credibilità,  mattone su mattone. Loro non l’hanno avuto. Loro escono da li’ e si ritrovano in PalaSport.

    Allora, se sono bravi e continuano a lavorare su loro stessi, senza aver paura di non vendere il disco, senza aver paura di fare quello che devono fare: soprattutto leggere. Ecco perchè io tengo alla cultura.

    Io non ero cosi nel 1981, io sono cresciuta. Cantavo le stesse canzoni, canzoncine che cantavano loro, ma poi sono cresciuta e ho iniziato a conoscere persone intorno a me, piu colte di me, che ne sapevano di piu’.  Ho cercano piano piano di sentirmi alla pari, non sentirmi da meno. Quando parlavano di uno scrittore che non conoscevo io correvo di corsa a comprare il libro.”

    Sei stata vicina molto vicina a  Pino Daniele, un mito per molti giovani. E’ emozionante sentire come lo canti. Cosa ti manca. Cosa pensi abbia dato alla musica.

    “E’ stato un grande amico, abbiamo fatto una bellissima tournee con De Gregori e Ron. Io e Pino abbiamo avuto un bellissimo rapporto, ci volevamo bene a vicenda. Pino era Napoli. La sua storia ed il suo presente. La sua vita era per la musica. Mi ha insegnato a cantare in napoletano, mi correggeva quando sbagliavo e ci facevamo tante risate. E’ stato un grande musicista che ho ascoltato e ascoltato e ascoltato per anni, prima di conoscerlo. Che ho studiato prima di conoscere. E’ stata una grande perdita. Canto le sue canzoni, per renderlo immortale.”

    Pino era molto legato a New York. Amava questa citta’. Ne trovava anche punti in comune con Napoli. Tu cosa ami di New York?

    “New York è meravigliosa, architettonicamente è una citta meravigliosa, moderna, costruita con un impatto urbanistico straordinario. Ogni volta che vengo è sempre eccitante. New York, con tutta la sua arte, ha fatto parte del nostro immaginario.  Girarla è come vivere nei  telefilm che guardavamo e nei film che amavamo.”

    La obbligo a scegliere un posto tra i tanti che ama a New York. Non è facile per lei. 

    Mi risponde: “High Line, vecchia ferrovia’.”  

    Le chiedo se ha fiducia nel futuro:

    “Anche se c’è in questo momento un appiattimento globale, siamo in attesa di un Risorgimento che ci sará, ci deve essere. “

     

    "È una regola che vale in tutto l'universo
    Chi non lotta per qualcosa ha già comunque perso
    E anche se la paura fa tremare
    Non ho mai smesso di lottare"

    Sono alcune righe di 'Combattente' è il singolo e poi il titolo al suo album e quindi alla tournée.  Andate a leggere il testo prima di ascoltarlo.  Vi troverete l'energia e l'amore che scaturisce da Fiorella Mannoia. Ogni strofa invita a non arrendersi, a risorgere, a combattere. Il testo lo ha scritto Federica Abbate e sembra aver letto dentro Fiorella. 

    Lo scorso anno è stato straordinario per lei. Dopo il secondo posto al Festival di Sanremo, il successo dell’album Combattente, il ruolo nel film “7 minuti” di Michele Placido, la tournee in Italia e all’estero  in luoghi come  il Bataclan di Parigi, il Den Atelier di Lussemburgo, La Madeleine di Bruxelles e la Union Chapel di Londra, fino al suo debutto televisivo come in show televisivo condotto sol solo da lie intitolato  "Uno, due, tre... Fiorella!".“

    E fra qualche settimana il  23 febbraio Fiorella sarà al The Town Hall.  Non ci anticipa cosa canterà esattamente. Inutile insistere. Noi siamo certi che sarà un altro dei suoi concerti con il cuore.  Sarà per  gli italiani di New York , che certo saranno in maggioranza ad ascoltarla, ma anche per quegli americani che rimarranno sicuramente affascinati dalla sua voce, dal  suo incredibile modo dare energia attraverso la musica che interpreta.

    ----

    "“Combattente”" di Fiorella Mannoia 
    Friday, February 23, 2018 • 8:00pm
    Get tickets >>

     

Pages