header i-Italy

Mariuccia Zerilli Marimò. Her Absence from this Home Will be her More Intense Presence

Stefano Albertini (October 17, 2016)
Remembering Mariuccia Zerilli-Marimò, Casa Italiana Founder, one year later (1926-2015). Following are the words of Casa Italiana Director Stefano Albertini, pronounced on the occasion of the Memorial Tribute to Baroness Mariuccia Zerilli-Marimò, on November 13, 2015

Maria Chiara, Riccardo, Tao Massimo e Yang
Board Members of New York University and of Casa Italiana,
Friends and fans of our founder, welcome back home! Bentornati a Casa!

I have climbed these two steps to reach this podium almost every day of my life for the past twenty-one years, but today my legs feel heavy and my voice struggles to come out and, I know, will struggle even more as I try to share with you how the Baroness shaped not only the appearance of this building but also its substance and its soul. With Maria Chiara, during the days preceding the Baroness’s funeral, we were talking about how she lived at least three lives: a first one as a young girl growing up in Fascist Italy and in war-ridden Milan; a second as the wife and partner of one of the most prominent protagonists of the industrial reconstruction of Italy after WW2 and of the economic miracle that witnessed Italy's transition from one of the most impoverished European countries to one of the most industrialized nations in the world; and a third as the young widow who, after a period of deep sorrow and lack of motivation, found the strength to re-invent herself by crafting a new ‘persona’, and inventing a role that was rather unique if not completely unheard of especially for a woman and even more so for an Italian woman in an American context.

Regarding Mariuccia the child and the young girl, there is nothing we can add to Beyond these Walls, https://youtu.be/qKCQq-bwd08 a little jewel of a documentary that combines history and poetry and that could be subtitled ‘a story of two stubborn ladies' (one in front of the camera and one behind it). When approached by the producer Elizabeth Hemmerdinger, the Baroness was surprised and had doubts about shooting a documentary about herself: “who is going to care about what I did during the war? I was one of the millions of people affected by it, and not even in the most horrible way” she used to repeat to me. But the film did not have the ambition to unveil a new source on WW2 history, but more acutely to show how the war experience shaped and streghtened the personality of the young Mariuccia by giving her a sincere commitment and longing for peace and ultimately for dialogue, the only way in which wars can be avoided and peace can be achieved and maintained.

During her 'second' life, she lived by the side, and partly in the shadow, of the larger-than-life entrepreneur Guido Zerilli. All of you, I’m sure, heard her talk about her Guido on some occasion or another and you must have been as struck as I always was in hearing the same unchanging love, admiration and devotion coming from her whenever she talked about her late husband. By Guido’s side, she also started her social and diplomatic apprenticeship, rubbing elbows with industrialists, heads of states, and diplomats. She would always remember, among the daytime nightmares of that period, the small dinners at the Quirinale Palace, the residence of the President of the Italian Republic who, possibly encouraged by her young age and even younger appearance, never missed a chance to test her knowledge on Italian and European history. What was the name of the finance minister of a certain king, who succeeded some queen or another… But of that period, the Baroness always remembered the spirit that animated all Italians involved in the reconstruction effort; everybody wanted to put the country back on its feet: enterpreneurs, workers and politicians seemed - for a short while - to have overcome their differences in order to achieve a single strongly desired goal: the moral, economical and political rebirth of the motherland, la Patria, a word the Baroness was not ashamed to pronounce.

But most of us here, except her family, obviously, came to know only the 'third' Mariuccia, a woman who overcame the grief and sorrow for the loss of her husband by creating a brand new life for herself, driven by the desire to promote culture and the arts as fundamental parts of the dialogue between people of all nations. It is after Guido’s death that she finally was able to complete with great passion and - you can be sure - brilliant results, the college degree she hadn't completed as a young woman. Her beloved romance languages and literature, as well as European history, kept her company during many sleepless nights in Lausanne.

The foundation of this Casa was the pinnacle of her much larger and influential presence, especially here in New York, a city she loved from the first trip with her husband (on an ocean liner, of course) until she established her residence on Central Park South. She loved the fast pace of New York, she loved the no-nonsense attitude of newyorkers, she loved the never ending surprises that pop up at every corner, she loved the many layers of its relatively short history, and, of course, she absolutely loved its bustling and sparkling cultural and artistic life. When she had to choose the base for her third life, she had no doubts and chose New York, a city that embraced her and understood her.

Let me define her with five adjectives, only because I have to limit myself: She was MAGNIFICA, as Stefano Vaccara defined her in his article for La Voce di New York, and indeed her mecenatism had its roots in the Italian Renaissance. She was and remains an exception on the Italian scene, where many people with extraordinary patrimonies don't give anything to anybody. Her generosity was not an action, the action of donating something to a person or a cause; her generosity was a state of mind, a natural disposition of her kind heart, as so many people have reminded us these days. Her generosity was a tactful, graceful, and truly noble way to help people and causes.

She was PASSIONATE about the things she loved. And this place, her Casa, she loved very dearly. She did everything she could so it would not only be "named" Casa but also would "feel" like a home for the students, professors and members of the community who crossed its threshold. When she was in New York, she wouldn't miss a single event, and when she was here, she would graciously greet the people who came in and ask them about themselves and their families. She always said, and Maria Chiara is not jealous, that Casa was her other daughter, and we try every day to be faithful to the values that the Baroness taught us through her example more than with words: work hard, use resources intelligently and without squandering, always put that touch of elegance and class in everything we do.

She was strongly OPINIONATED and at the same time RESPECTFUL of all points of view. A short episode will help me explain her attitude in this regard: an Italian politician of the far left came to give a talk. The Baroness came, took her seat, listened to the whole speech, graciously greeted him, thanked him afterwards and went home. The morning after I was waiting, somehow anxiously, for her call, as she would normally call me every morning after an event she attended, to comment it together. “He is really brilliant -she started- he has the rhetorical skills of a Roman tribune and an excellent preparation” followed by a long pause and, while I was starting to feel relieved, she continued: “he is very dangerous”. I was silent and she suggested that now we should invite somebody from the right wing coalition to somehow counterbalance the very successful talk of the evening before. But her conclusion was: “who are we going to call? They are all so clumsy that they would damage their own cause”. We both had a good laugh and continued to talk about other plans for the Casa.

Not once in the twenty-plus years we worked together did she tell me “why did you invite so-and-so?” or “I don’t like that conference or the politics of that film”. Never. On the contrary, she was always and only constructive and a true explosion of ideas and suggestions; she would read the Italian paper Il Corriere della Sera every day from cover to cover and she would cut out articles and handwrite on them “Per Stefano. Could this be of interest for an event at the Casa?” and when she came over she would hand me these big overstuffed envelopes with clippings that very often really turned into events.

You will forgive me if I keep to myself what she meant to me personally, especially in the darkest moment of my life, but that alone to me is the proof of the adjective that defines her better than any other, the simple and sometimes overused GOOD. I want to close my remarks not with my words, but with the words of the poet Attilio Bertolucci from a short poem he wrote in 1929. I’ll read it in Italian and will not translate it. It is my farewell to the Baroness and my promise to her and all of you. Her absence from this home will be her more intense presence:

Assenza
Più acuta presenza.
Vago pensier di te
Vaghi ricordi
Turbano l’ora calma
E il dolce sole.
Dolente il petto
Ti porta,
Come una pietra
Leggera.

-----------
Traduzione in italiano 
Familiari, parenti e amici della nostra fondatrice, bentornati a Casa!

Da 22 anni salgo praticamente ogni giorno questi due gradini per raggiungere questo podio, ma oggi le mie gambe sono pesanti e la mia voce fa fatica ad uscire e, lo so già, farà ancora più fatica mentre cercherò di raccontarvi come la Baronessa non ha solo determinato l’aspetto esteriore di questo edificio, ma anche la sua sostanza e, direi, la sua anima.

Con Maria Chiara, nei giorni precedenti il funerale della Baronessa ci dicevamo che aveva vissuto almeno tre vite: la prima da ragazzina nell’Italia fascista e nella Milano devastata dalla guerra; la seconda da moglie e ‘sodale’ di uno dei più importanti protagonisti della ricostruzione dell’Italia, dopo la fine del secondo conflitto mondiale e del miracolo economico che vide l’Italia passare da uno dei paesi più poveri d’Europa a una delle potenze più industrializzate del mondo; la terza da giovane vedova che, dopo un periodo di profonda tristezza e mancanza di motivazioni, trovò la forza di reinventarsi creando di fatto una nuova ‘persona’: un ruolo che era piuttosto unico, se non completamente inedito specialmente per una donna e ancora di più per una donna italiana in un contesto americano.

A proposito della Mariuccia ragazzina non possiamo aggiungere niente a quel piccolo gioiello che è Beyond these Walls, https://youtu.be/qKCQq-bwd08, un documentario che combina storia e poesia. Quando la produttrice del documentario, Elizabeth Hemmerdinger le propose il progetto, la Baronessa mi manifestò ripetutamente la sua perplessità e i suoi dubbi: “a chi può interessare quello che ho fatto io durante la guerra? Io ero solo uno dei milioni di persone toccate e nemmeno nella maniera più atroce”.

Ma il film non aveva la pretesa di svelare una nuova fonte della storia della seconda guerra mondiale, ma più acutamente, di mostrare come l’esperienza della guerra aveva formato e fortificato la personalità della giovane Mariuccia, dandole un sincero desiderio di pace e quindi una propensione per il dialogo, l’unico modo in cui le guerre possono essere evitate e la pace può essere ottenuta e mantenuta.

Durante la sua ‘seconda vita’, visse accanto e, in parte, all’ombra del marito, Guido Zerilli, straordinario imprenditore farmaceutico, ma anche giornalista e diplomatico. Tutti voi, ne sono sicuro, l’hanno sentita parlare del suo Guido in qualche occasione e credo che anche voi, come me, sarete stati colpiti dall’amore immutabile, dall’ammirazione e dalla devozione che trasparivano dalle sue parole tutte le volte che parlava del marito. Proprio accanto a Guido iniziò il suo apprendistato sociale e diplomatico.

Ricordava spesso tra gli incubi diurni di quel periodo le cene riservate al Quirinale, durante le quali il Presidente della Repubblica Einaudi, forse incoraggiato dalla sua giovane età e ancor più giovane apparenza, non perdeva occasione per interrogarla in storia italiana ed europea. Ma di quel periodo, la Baronessa ricordava soprattutto lo spirito che animava gli italiani coinvolti nella ricostruzione: tutti volevano rimettere in piedi il paese. Sembrava che, per un troppo breve periodo, imprenditori, lavoratori e politici avessero superato le loro differenze per raggiungere un unico agognato fine: la rinascita morale, economica e politica della Patria. Patria, una parola che la Baronessa usava senza timidezza.

Ma la maggior parte di noi, eccetto la sua famiglia, ovviamente, ha conosciuto solo la ‘terza’ Mariuccia, una donna che è riuscita a superare il dolore e l’angoscia per la perdita del marito, creando per sé una vita nuova, spinta dal desiderio di promuovere la cultura e le arti come parti fondamentali del dialogo tra popoli di tutte le nazioni. Fu infatti solo dopo la morte di Guido che riuscì a conseguire con grande passione e brillanti risultati la laurea che non aveva potuto completare da ragazza. Le sue amate lingue e letterature romanze e la storia europea le hanno fatto compagnia in tante notti insonni a Losanna. La fondazione di questa Casa è stata l’apice della sua ben più grande e influente presenza, specialmente qui a New York, una città che amò dal primo viaggio col marito in transatlantico negli anni ‘50 fino a quando stabilì la sua residenza su Central Park South. Le piaceva il ritmo veloce della città, si trovava a suo agio con l’atteggiamento pragmatico e poco cerimonioso dei newyorkesi, era affascinata dalle infinite sorprese che la città ti riserva praticamente a ogni angolo, era incuriosita dai molti strati della sua seppur breve storia, ma amava soprattutto la vivacità e l’originalità della scena artistica e culturale. Per tutte queste ragioni, quando si trattò di scegliere la base per la sua ‘terza vita’ non ebbe dubbi o esitazioni e scelse New York, una città che la capì e la abbracciò.

Vorrei ora limitarmi a cinque aggettivi per definirla. Era MAGNIFICA, come l’ha definita Stefano Vaccara nel suo articolo per La Voce di New York. E infatti il suo mecenatismo ha le sue radici nel Rinascimento italiano. Mariuccia Zerilli era e rimane un’eccezione sulla scena italiana, dove tantissime persone con patrimoni ingenti non danno niente a nessuno. La sua generosità non consisteva nell’azione di donare qualcosa a una persona o a una causa, la sua generosità era un tratto del suo carattere, una disposizione naturale del suo cuore buono, come tante persone mi ricordano costantemente. La sua generosità era discreta, direi elegante e veramente un modo nobile di aiutare persone e cause.

Era APPASSIONATA delle cose che amava. E questo lugo, la sua Casa lo amava in maniera tutta particolare. Fece tutto quanto era possibile affinché non fosse una Casa solo nel nome, ma affinché facesse sentire veramente ‘a casa’ gli studenti, i professori e chiunque attraversa la sua soglia. Quando era a New York non perdeva un evento e quando era qui salutava volentieri le persone che partecipavano e chiedeva a ciascuno di sé e della sua famiglia. La Baronessa diceva sempre, e Maria Chiara non è gelosa, che la Casa era la sua altra figlia e noi cerchiamo di essere fedeli ogni giorno ai valori che la Baronessa ci ha insegnato con l’esempio più che con le parole: lavorare sodo, usare le risorse in maniera intelligente e senza sprechi, mettere sempre un tocco di classe e di eleganza in ogni cosa che facciamo.

Era al tempo stesso OSTINATA, ma anche RISPETTOSA dei punti di vista altrui. Un breve episodio mi aiuterà a spiegare il suo atteggiamento a riguardo. Un politico italiano di estrema sinistra venne a fare una conferenza. La Baronessa venne a sentirlo, lo salutò molto gentilmente prima e lo ringraziò alla fine del suo intervento e poi tornò a casa. La mattina dopo aspettavo, anche con un po’ d’ansia, la sua telefonata, visto che normalmente mi chiamava sempre il giorno dopo un evento al quale aveva partecipato per commentarlo insieme. “È veramente brillante – esordì – ha le capacità retoriche di un tribuno romano e un’eccellente preparazione”. Seguì una lunga pausa e mentre io cominciavo a sentire un po’ di sollievo continuò: “È pericolosissimo!”. Io rimasi in silenzio e lei suggerì di invitare qualcuno della coalizione di centro-destra per controbilanciare il successo della conferenza della sera precedente. Ma dopo un’altra pausa di silenzio la sua conclusione fu: “ma chi invitiamo? Sono tutti così maldestri che finirebbero col danneggiare la loro stessa causa.” E così, chiuso il bilancio della sera prima con una risata continuammo a fare piani per la Casa.
Non una sola volta in più di vent’anni di collaborazione mi ha detto “perché ha invitato Tizio?” o “Non mi piace l’impostazione di quella conferenza o la linea politica di quel film”. Mai! Al contrario, era sempre e solo costruttiva e propositiva, una vera esplosione di idee e suggerimenti. Ovunque fosse nel mondo, leggeva Il Corriere della Sera ogni giorno da cima a fondo; ritagliava gli articoli che riteneva più importanti per noi e poi scriveva a matita un commento del tipo “Per Stefano. Potrebbe interessare per un evento alla Casa?” e quando arrivava nel mio ufficio la prima cosa che faceva era la consegna di queste buste strapiene di ritagli di giornale che spesso sono davvero diventate nostre iniziative.

Mi perdonerete se tengo per me quello che la Baronessa ha rappresentato per me personalmente, specialmente nel momento più oscuro della mia vita. Il ricordo del suo sostegno materno in quel momento giustifica per me l’attributo che la definisce meglio di qualunque altro: il semplice, e qualche volta inflazionato, BUONA.

Voglio chiudere questo mio ricordo non con le mie parole, ma con le parole del poeta Attilio Bertolucci da una breve poesia del 1929. È il mio addio alla Baronessa e la mia promessa a lei, alla sua famiglia e a tutti voi: la sua assenza da questa casa sarà in realtà una sua presenza più intensa.

Assenza
Più acuta presenza.
Vago pensier di te
Vaghi ricordi
Turbano l’ora calma
E il dolce sole.
Dolente il petto
Ti porta,
Come una pietra
Leggera.
 

 

---

 

Stefano Albertini is a native of Bozzolo in the Northern Italian province of Mantua studied at the Università di Parma, where he majored in Political History. After obtaining his M.A. in Italian Literature from the University of Virginia he was admitted to Stanford University where he earned his Ph.D. with a dissertation on the rethoric of violence in Niccolò Machiavelli’s writings.
He has published extensively on topics ranging from Dante to Renaissance Literature, to Church/State relations during fascism.
Since 1994, he has been teaching literature and cinema in the Department of Italian Studies at New York University. From 1995 to February 1998 he was Associate Director of Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò and since then he has served as Director.

Comments

i-Italy

Facebook

Google+

Select one to show comments and join the conversation