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  • Excerpted from "Flavor and Soul. Naples and Palermo were cultural crossroads where European, African, and Arab music had intermixed for centuries; the migrants who passed through these port cities on their way to the New World participated in the process of intercultural synthesis that produced jazz, the tango, the rumba, and other new song forms and dance styles which in turn traveled from New Orleans, Buenos Aires, Havana and other cities back across the Atlantic.
  • March 19th marks a significant day for both Catholics and non-Catholic in New Orleans. It is the feast of St. Joseph–a patron saint of Sicily who helped provide relief to the Sicilian people during a famine. NOLA residents certainly do not miss out on their chance to celebrate the saint.
  • The double bass
    People often view the double bass as an awkward and grouchy member of the group. But with its noble origin, it is essential to the sound of a jazz band. Without the double bass as a point of reference, the other instruments would be lost.
  • Il contrabbasso
    Troppo spesso il contrabbasso viene considerato un personaggio ingombrante e di poca importanza per la musica jazz. Eppure è uno strumento - di origini nobili e antiche - fondamentale per il sound dei brani.
  • Facts & Stories
    Samantha Janazzo(February 22, 2017)
    In the United States when we think of Mardi Gras we think New Orleans with floats, fried food, and colorful plastic beaded necklaces. In Italy, Martedì Grasso means Venice's Carnivale, complete with ornate masks, theatric performances, and a parade through Piazza San Marco.
  • The Italian American Writers Association (iawa) authors Maria Lisella and poet and performance artist, Frank Messina on Saturday, January 17 at Cornelia St. Café, 29 Cornelia St. in New York City’s Greenwich Village, www.corneliastreetcafe.com; or 212-989-9319. The reading takes place from 5:45 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. and kicks off with Open Mic readings of five minutes followed by the featured writers.
  • Art & Culture
    George De Stefano(September 12, 2014)
    Cosimo Matassa, a son of Sicilian immigrants, was a key figure in the creation of the "New Orleans Sound" that changed American popular music.