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  • How is Italian gastronomy really doing? What are its future prospects in terms of internationally trading our products and culinary specialties, in particular pizza? We were able to speak about it with Luciano Pignataro, who is a renown journalist from Il Mattino, a food expert and critic, and the founder of the very popular Luciano Pignataro Wine & Food Blog, on the occasion of the New York’s leg of “Le Strade della Mozzarella” event.
  • Excerpted from "Flavor and Soul. Naples and Palermo were cultural crossroads where European, African, and Arab music had intermixed for centuries; the migrants who passed through these port cities on their way to the New World participated in the process of intercultural synthesis that produced jazz, the tango, the rumba, and other new song forms and dance styles which in turn traveled from New Orleans, Buenos Aires, Havana and other cities back across the Atlantic.
  • Roman Film Director Saverio Costanzo
    The series will be directed by Saverio Costanzo. Elena Ferrante, whose real identity remains unknown, will be collaborating on the screenplay via email
  • Mario Martone excitedly introduces his new Naples based television show about the famous early 1900s actor Eduardo De Filippo. This will be the directors very first TV series after releasing 15 successful films since his debut in 1985.
  • Legend has it that Romulus founded Rome 2,770 years ago on April 21. Among the birthday celebrations was an outdoor concert on the Tiber River to honor artist William Kentridge, whose 1,804-feet long frieze decorates the embankment. Other handsome murals are now also appearing in Rome.
  • The Sails of Scampia—a crime-ridden housing project in Campania's capital—will be bulldozed this summer as part of government plans to improve deprived areas on the outskirts of Italian cities.
  • Tampa, Florida, 1910. The lynching of Castenge Ficarrotta and Angelo Albano simply for being Italian (from the forthcoming book edited by William Connell and Stanislao Pugliese, “The Routledge History of Italian Americans.”)
    President Trump’s recent Executive Order can be seen in two very different historical perspectives. On the one hand, it is in keeping with a long tradition of demonizing immigrants—something Italians, among others, have long experienced in the past. On the other hand, Americans often point with pride to the history of accepting immigrants, as embodied (literally) in the figure of the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor. Italian Americans have a particular responsibility in this new (or old) political landscape.

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