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  • Art & Culture
    Amy Riolo(January 03, 2018)
    A journey through DC’s Italian roots while enjoying its contemporary Italian-centric culture. The city’s strong ties to the Italian sense of beauty have remained steady through modern times.
  • Meet artist Margaret Ricciardi, born 103 years ago in Brooklyn to immigrants from Calitri (Avellino). Joining her in as she recounts her family memories and her life as an artist, is Margaret’s niece, Laura Erikson. This interview is a preview, part of the Second Season of the I-ITALY TV SERIES "Grandparents and Grandchildren in Italian America." And stay tuned for the full video.
  • Joseph Guagliardo, national president of the Conference of Presidents of Major Italian-American Organizations
    Joseph Guagliardo, national president of the Conference of Presidents of Major Italian-American Organizations, recounts how the “Columbus Controversy” started in New York and explains why it touches all Italian Americans, “both the blue-collars and the bluebloods,” as he says. He emphasizes that his family came to the U.S. in 1906 and had nothing to do with American slavery or what Columbus did 550 years ago—on which, he notes, scholars still disagree. “We came looking for a better life. We learned about Columbus in school here, and it became our thing.”
  • Barnes & Noble Announces More Than 100 Italian-American Authors Marching Up Fifth Avenue in the Columbus Citizens Foundation's Annual Columbus Day Parade. Chairman and Founder of Barnes & Noble Leonard Riggio Is this year's Grand Marshal and created the theme "A Celebration of Italian-American Authors" Barnes & Noble Will Hand Out 50,000 Copies of The Constitution of the United States of America with the Declaration of Independence for Free at the Parade. Angelo Vivolo, President of the Columbus Citizens Foundation, had this to say; "The Columbus Citizens Foundation is so honored to have Leonard Riggio as this year's Grand Marshal in our 73rdannual parade. His celebration of Italian-American authors and his creation of this year's Parade theme are both clear indications of the Parade's intention of celebrating Italian-American culture and achievement."
  • "Italics." There are more than 250 million people around the world who belong to a community that began with Italy. Many of them don’t speak Italian, don’t live in Italy, and perhaps haven’t even been there. Despite this, they feel as if Italy is a part of their being. This “Italian” identity outside of Italy began thanks to emigration, but it has since developed into something more. Piero Bassetti—a renowned entrepreneur, politician, and public intellectual—defines this feeling as “Italicity.” Bassetti presented his new book and manifesto, "Let’s Wake Up Italics!" at the Consulate General of Italy in New York.
  • Characterized by an exciting energy and an air of elegance, the 2017 La Scuola Gala Benefit Dinner took place on March 24 to commemorate the jubilee with live entertainment and fine dining in the presence of important political dignitaries and the evening’s accomplished honorees: Mauro Porcini of PepsiCo and George A. Hirsch of “New York Magazine.”
  • Vincent Viola arrives at Trump Tower for meetings with the President-elect on Dec. 16. (Bryan R. Smith, AFP/Getty Images)
    The Italian-American businessman, veteran, and philanthropist becomes the latest addition to Trump’s presidential team.
  • I-Italy’s “Grandparents and Grandchildren in Italian America” project documents the Italian presence in the United States by way of a series of conversations between grandparents and grandchildren. We have only just begun this new adventure with our first TV and Web series made in collaboration with ANFE and with the support of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Now our hope is to continue the project in a truly “social” vein with your help.

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