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Articles by: Chiara Basso

  • The Vessel at Hudson Yards (Photo Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
    I had heard about this structure called The Vessel that was about to be inaugurated in the Hudson Yards - I had also seen a rendering - but its was only when I saw pictures of it emerging on social media that I said: “Wow! I really need to go to see it.” Yes, I fell in the trap too. The Vessel, British design and Italian manufacture, is a shining dream for our selfie-obsessed society: 2500 steps amazingly organized in a dantesque structure with a wonderful view on the Hudson river. It is a $200 million stairway to nowhere in a $25 billion neighborhood.
  • Chiara Izzi
    This Italian artist is not afraid to explore her vocal potential in different languages and across genres. Yesterday at Birdland, she presented her second and newly released album, Across the Sea (Jando), co-created with pianist and vocalist Kevin Hays. And now she is also planning a tour.
  • Maria Sophocles and her family at the Como Lake
    Living the Italian Dream: Part V. You made it: you realized your dream of living in Italy, but for different reasons you also have to move back to the US. Often this experience can become a reverse culture shock. Especially if you didn’t move abroad alone but with your entire family. Here the stories of Michelle, who moved to Spello with a husband, three kids and two cats, and Maria, who relocated to Como with her family of four children. The youngest was just a few weeks old when she moved to Italy.
  • Kacey Musgraves
    Tutt’altro che storici e diversificati, gli Oscar 2019 sono sembrati una carrellata di cattivo gusto, premi prevedibili, anche quando sono risultati “a sorpresa” come Green Book, e decisamente troppo politically correct. Meno male che a scaldarci i cuori ci hanno pensato Lady Gaga a Bradley Cooper.
  • Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper (Photo Credit: ABC)
    Let’s face it: the 2019 Academy Awards ceremony won’t be remembered as an Italian-American night, yet we owe a few rare highlights in an otherwise soporific TV gala to some Italian American artists. Thank you Lady Gaga, Bradley Cooper, and Nick Vallelonga (through the surprise victory of “Green Book”). Also, a shout out to Bob Persichetti and Italian Sara Pichelli for their “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” which won Best Animated Feature.
  • Valentina Imbeni with a young learner
    Facts & Stories
    Chiara Basso(February 20, 2019)
    This Italian immersion school in San Francisco started as a playgroup in 2002 and now counts 320 children. Director Valentina Imbeni: "Parents from different backgrounds chose us not only because they love Italy and Italian culture but also because we are inspired by the Reggio Emilia educational approach and are the First International Baccalaureate (IB) K8 World School in the city."
  • Boccadasse, a former fishermen’s village now part of Genoa, Liguria.
    Living the Italian Dream: Part IV. Marilyn Ricci went to Italy to meet her Italian relatives and then decided to settle in Chiavari. 100% Italian-American raised within a huge Italian-American family, in 2015 she founded a travel company that assists others like her to find their Italian town or region of origin.
  • Giovanni Battista Moroni, Portrait of a Young Woman, ca. 1575. Photo: Michael Bodycomb
    Giovanni Battista Moroni (b. 1520-24; d. 1579-80) painted his sitters exactly as they appeared before him - no artistic or idealized filters applied. The Frick Collection is the first museum in North America to present a major exhibition devoted to the 16th-century artist famous for his naturalistic portraits but almost unknown in the US.
  • Sandro Botticelli (Italian, 1444 or 1445-1510), The Story of Lucretia, 1499-1500. Credit: Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston
    After having being separated for hundreds of years, two iconic, Renaissance paintings by artist Sandro Botticelli have been reunited, first in Italy and now in Boston at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. They are "The Tragedy of Lucretia,” purchased in 1894 by Isabella Stewart Gardner and first Botticelli to land on US soil, and “The Story of Virginia,” from the Accademia Carrara in Bergamo. They are the core of a new exhibit in the Gardner Museum's Hostetter Gallery (in the new wing), "Botticelli: Heroines + Heroes," through May 19.
  • (Photo credit: Gruppo Italiano)
    Futurist Eddie Yoon shared alarming data at a panel discussion with the Gotha of Italian specialty food in New York: younger generations want to cook less and less, in 20 years they won’t probably even drive to a restaurant but they will prefer to have their meals delivered at home, and they want to be fed as quickly as possible without waiting or staying in line. Is it real? Is the food industry ready for this? The panelists of Italian Table Talks, organized by Gruppo Italiano at the NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò, had different thoughts about it.

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