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  • The struggle over ius soli, or citizenship based upon place of birth, has turned the Senate into a battleground. It is also feeding into the larger clash over immigrants, the essential political battle underway in Italy today and tomorrow.
  • Artist William Papaleo in front of his oil paintings
    The John D. Calandra Italian American Institute is currently hosting a fascinating art exhibition entitled “Breaking Walls: An Emigrant/Immigrant Journey through Southern Italy” which features the work of American artist, William Papaleo.
  • World-renowned chef Lidia Matticchio Bastianich during i-Italy's interview
    World-famous Italian chef Lidia Bastianich has a story that transcends the culinary industry. Lidia was born following the conclusion of World War II, a time when European countries were still settling border disputes. As a young girl, she grew up among three different cultures, each with a profound influence on her. Today, as a professional, Lidia’s childhood experiences and her family ties continue to prove monumental in her continued success.
  • Celebratory students at a past California State University, Northridge commencement ceremony. Photo by Lee Choo (courtesy https://csunshinetoday.csun.edu)
    Were it not for the United States’ earlier generous stance towards foreign students, even those from former enemy nations, I would not be here myself. My father came to the United States in 1953 on one of the first Fulbright scholarships. And even though he came from Italy, an enemy nation during much of WWII, he and countless others like him were welcomed to the United States through these scholarships.
  • Facebook i-Italy
    After publishing a few articles critical of Trump's Executive Order, our Facebook "likes" remain in equilibrium.
    The most commonly held view of Italian Americans is that they are overwhelmingly conservative. Our social network experience, however, tells us a different, more complex story. In response to the recent presidential executive order, i-Italy has published a series of articles from various contributors who took the side of opposition. Once the posts hit Facebook, we received mixed feedback from our readers. While the hundreds of "likes" and "shares" received in the first 24 hours show that the majority applaud the content, many of the comments and replies suggest otherwise—most defend Trump’s reasoning and argue with the opinions presented in the articles. This proves that not all Italian Americans are of the same mindset. It also reflects a historical shift in public behavior that has already been observed many times in America: liberals tend to constitute a more "silent" majority online (they are content with pressing the "like" button) while conservatives are more vocal and tend to occupy the sphere of public discourse (they use the "comments" tool more frequently).
  • In a side event of the United Nations General Assembly, world leaders share their opinions and approaches to migratory and refuges flows from Africa and the Middle East into Europe.
  • On April 8th, the Westchester Italian Cultural Center will welcome Fred Gardaphe, Distinguished Professor of English and Italian American Studies John D. Calandra Italian American Institute, to participate in the panel In The Name of the Father and The Son: Italians Migrations in the art of Joseph and William Papaleo. Professor Gardaphe will analyze the relationship between Joseph and William Papaleo, father and son, respectively a writer and painter. Comparing two generations, which, through their own artistic perspective, have both touched upon the themes of emigration - immigration.

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