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  • Until now, tourism has been hailed as Italy's magic beam, transporting the country beyond the losses from runaway factories and ever more present robots. Nevertheless a small but serious reaction against the vast influx of tourists is becoming evident.
  • On April 21 Rome celebrates its official birthday, 2,771 years after the city's legendary founding by Romulus in 753 BC. For the occasion a parade of 2,000 in costume -- gladiators, politicians, priestesses -- will take place. After exhibits and lectures the day ends with a traditional gigantic fireworks display.
  • At Palazzo Braschi, from April 11th throughout August 19th, visitors will have the unique occasion to go on a journey through the art of the Italian master Canaletto, in the largest exhibition of Canaletto works ever held in Italy.
  • March 16 marks the 40th anniversary of the day when Aldo Moro was kidnapped and his five bodyguards were killed by Red Brigades, in a military-style operation on Via Fani in Rome. The ghost of that murder still haunts Italian politics.
  • Poem (Wild Geese), 2015. Courtesy of Claudia Palmira
    A selection of works by the multifaceted Italian American talent, Claudia Palmira, are on view at the prominent Margutta Home Gallery in Rome from February 22nd. Along with artists, Elena Drommi, Claudia Bellini and Fabio Ferrone Viola, the exhibition will run through March 25th, 2018.
  • Capitoline museum in Palazzo Nuovo
    Italy is celebrating the nearly three centuries since inauguration of the world's first public art museum, the Capitoline, founded and funded in 1733 with income from, of all things, a public lottery.
  • Jan 12, Carabinieri at Rome show recovered presepe figures
    Facts & Stories
    Judith Harris(January 18, 2018)
    Art thefts in Italy are on the way down, and this week Carabinieri in Rome showed their latest recovered objects: 250 valuable antique nativity scene figures. Nevertheless, and despite thefts like the Al Thani jewels in Venice, art crimes in Italy have seriously dropped.
  • Everyone knows that Rome destroyed Jerusalem in 70 CE. But most people do not appreciate how much, in the period before the War, Rome also built up Jerusalem, serving as a valuable ally and as a stabilizing force during the interminable Hasmonean family fights over who would be high priest. This evening together we will explore both the good and the bad in the the highly charged relationship between these two Eternal Cities. Join historian Paula Fredriksen (Hebrew University of Jerusalem) on a fascinating journey into the formative era of Western Judaism.

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