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  • Origini antichissime per un prodotto che Cristoforo Colombo portò in Europa dall'America. Nasce con gli indigeni che preparavano una ricetta a base di farina di mais e acqua.
  • Polenta is a dish of boiled cornmeal. It may be consumed hot as a porridge or allowed to cool and solidify into a loaf, which is then baked, fried, or grilled. As it is known today, polenta derives from earlier forms of grain mush (known as puls or pulmentum in Latin or more commonly as gruel or porridge), commonly eaten since Roman times. Before the introduction of corn (maize) from America in the 16th century, polenta was made with such starchy ingredients as farro, chestnut flour, millet, spelt, and chickpeas. Let's find out how to make polenta with mushrooms.
  • Pietro Longhi, La polenta
    Dining in & out
    Dino Borri(January 12, 2017)
    Deep roots for a product that Christopher Columbus brought over from Europe to America. Indigenous peoples first prepared it using cornmeal and water.
  • Grilled Polenta With Mushrooms and Ragù
    Dining in & out: From Eataly Magazine
    EATALY MAGAZINE(November 30, 2016)
    This alpine recipe for grilled polenta and hearty mushrooms is designed to warm you down to your toes after an exhilarating day in the cold winter air.
  • Dining in & out: Articles & Reviews
    N. L.(April 14, 2016)
    If someone were to say there is no such thing as Italian cuisine--that instead there are Italian cuisines--they would be perfectly right. As in architecture and history, Italy’s great eno-gastronomical asset is its diversity. Which brings us to this small selection of restaurants in New York dedicated to Northern Italian cuisine and its variety of rich flavors. From polenta to farinata, braised meat to pesto, risotto Milanese to liver alla veneziana: there are so many interpretations of these dishes that take us back to the ambience of that part of Italy underneath the Alps. And don’t forget the wines...