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  • Polenta is a dish of boiled cornmeal. It may be consumed hot as a porridge or allowed to cool and solidify into a loaf, which is then baked, fried, or grilled. As it is known today, polenta derives from earlier forms of grain mush (known as puls or pulmentum in Latin or more commonly as gruel or porridge), commonly eaten since Roman times. Before the introduction of corn (maize) from America in the 16th century, polenta was made with such starchy ingredients as farro, chestnut flour, millet, spelt, and chickpeas. Let's find out how to make polenta with mushrooms.
  • Dining in & out: Articles & Reviews
    Natasha Lardera(August 08, 2015)
    The summer months in Italy welcome many food festivals. Among them, two celebrate Italy's two DOP garlics: Aglio di Voghiera DOP, hailing from the province of Ferrara, in Emilia-Romagna, and Aglio Bianco Polesano DOP, from Polesine, in Veneto. Garlic is an important ingredient in Italian cuisine but it is not used in everything, many still believe it is, as its distinctive taste can sometimes detract from that of other more shy ingredients.