header i-Italy

You chose: judith harris

  • One out of five young Italians are now classified as neither working, studying or in training programs -- double the percentage of young NEETs in the rest of Europe. Six out of ten say they have scant hope of achieving their parents' standard of living.
  • Novelist Igiaba Scego, the author of "Adua," interweaves time, people, and tragedies, as her solitary character, Adua, whispers her most secret thoughts and dreams to Bernini's marble statue of an elephant in front of the church of Santa Maria sopra Minerva.
  • At historic Amelia in Umbria, the Association for Research into Crimes against Art (ARCA) held its 8th annual international conference June 23-25. One focus this year was the endangered archeological and art heritage in the war-torn Middle East.
  • Thanks to Culture Minister Dario Franceschini's museum reform, management of 32 top Italian museums was opened to international competition in 2015. But today an administrative tribunal is kicking out the non-Italians - and kicking off a huge ruckus.
  • What is romance worth? A new study of spending on love (clothes, food, beauty products and such) found that when they say, "I love you," Italians splash out just $112. Other current statistics show marriages are on the rise -- but so are divorces.
  • From gladiators yielding plastic daggers to 3D adventures, the old Colosseum is up to new tricks, which include an exhibition showing its lively post-combat history.
  • Legend has it that Romulus founded Rome 2,770 years ago on April 21. Among the birthday celebrations was an outdoor concert on the Tiber River to honor artist William Kentridge, whose 1,804-feet long frieze decorates the embankment. Other handsome murals are now also appearing in Rome.
  • St. Peter's Basilica
    As Holy Week begins, the city is sunny, buds are bursting from the trees, bringing pilgrims and tourists to jam the streets and to visit St. Peter's Basilica, plus Rome's museums, monuments and two major new exhibitions.

Pages