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  • Earlier today, Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte met with President of Italian Republic, Sergio Mattarella, to present him with the list of ministers who will be part of his new government. Following their tete-a-tete, Prime Minister Conte read to the press the list of the members of his new cabinet. The new government, a coalition between the Movimento 5 Stelle party, the Democratic party, and supported by Liberi e Uguali (LeU), a small left-wing party, will be composed of 21 ministers - 7 of which are women. They will be officially sworn in tomorrow morning at 10am Italian time.
  • In the final run-off vote for local administrations June 9, affecting 3.5 million voters in 136 townships, participation dropped by a quarter, from a healthy 68.2% to 52%. Some historic left-wing administrations fell to the Lega, but in some cases 5-Star Movement (M5S) voters chose to vote for the center-left instead of Lega candidates.
  • M. C. Escher, Hand with reflecting sphere
    Facts & Stories
    Roberta Cutillo(May 15, 2019)
    A new book by the President of the Italian branch of leading research and analysis agency IPSOS, Nando Pagnoncelli, warns against the risks of governing through polls and reveals that Italians share a collective misperception of the country’s situation, particularly regarding economics, migration, and crime rates.
  • Italy has never had a woman president, but women here are taking giant political steps. Among the most visible are Laura Boldrini, president of the Chamber of Deputies; Federica Mogherini, foreign affairs minister for the European Union (EU), Emma Bonino, former Italian foreign affairs minister; and two big-city mayors, Virginia Raggi of Rome and Chiara Appendino of Turin.
  • Traditionalism is among the delights of Italy, where family and social customs that date back centuries continue to be honored. But even the most traditional society changes over time, and in 2016 Italy shows signs of coming of age in many respects, from civil unions to migrants and mascara.
  • As the daily outpouring showing the extent of corruption shows, “It’s an ill wind that blows nobody any good.” In the case of Italy, that ill wind is the troubled economy. Without the lingering recession that began in 2008, much that is unacceptable might have remained under the carpet. If so, we can be grateful. But now what?
  • Spring is busting out all over Italy, but the political climate remains deep winter. Premier Matteo Renzi, whose popularity had been robust at almost 40% in January, is watching his once firm grip on politics slip to today’s 33%. Meanwhile the stormy problems facing his government – public works, migrants, election rules – would challenge any leader anywhere.
  • In addition to his proposals for education and judiciary reform, Premier Matteo Renzi must address revision of labor legislation. This may be his toughest job, for it pits the government against the trade unions which in theory support Renzi’s Partito Democratico. At the heart of the problem is the “Workers’ Bill of Rights,” adopted in 1970. Can it be changed to make the work force more flexible? Industry hopes so; the unions disagree.

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