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Articles by: Anthony julian Tamburri

  • People have and will refer to Umberto Eco as any and all of the following: writer, linguist, philosopher, novelist, semiotician, journalist, etc. He was all of that, as he was also the academy’s intellectual rock star! One thing is guaranteed for sure, he shall not be lost in our memory!
  • There are those who read this expression as “See Naples and then die,” because once you’ve seenNaples there is no need to see anything else. Or, as the expression has also been interpreted, “See (the great/big city of) Naples and then (the small city of) Mori.” Nonetheless, whatever the phrase’s origin may be, let us just say that once you’ve seen Naples, you have surely seen it all.
  • As someone who has been teaching a foreign langauge (Italian) since 1972, I am delighted to see the NYC school system will add or expand 40 dual-language programs: Spanish, Japanese, Hebrew, Chinese, French and Haitian-Creole. I am also intrigued, however, that of the six “official” languages of the city of New York, according to the 2008 mayoral edict (Spanish, Chinese, Russian, Korean, Italian, and French Creole), Italian is not one of the language programs, whereas two non-“official” languages are, Hebrew and Japanese. In 2011, Gov. Cuomo ordered a similar mandate that included Spanish, Chinese, Italian, Russian, French, and French Creole.
  • As someone who has been teaching a foreign langauge (Italian) since 1972, I am delighted to see the NYC school system will add or expand 40 dual-language programs: Spanish, Japanese, Hebrew, Chinese, French and Haitian-Creole. I am also intrigued, however, that of the six “official” languages of the city of New York, according to the 2008 mayoral edict (Spanish, Chinese, Russian, Korean, Italian, and French Creole), Italian is not one of the language programs, whereas two non-“official” languages are, Hebrew and Japanese. In 2011, Gov. Cuomo ordered a similar mandate that included Spanish, Chinese, Italian, Russian, French, and French Creole.
  • Art & Culture
    Anthony Julian Tamburri(November 25, 2014)
    In order for Italian Americans to tackle head-on the discourse of race and ethnicity we should abandon the implicitly exclusionary term “tolerance,” which implies something distasteful, if not outright negative. We should embrace instead the more inclusive term “acceptance,” which underscores assent of a condition or situation—in this case, someone’s difference (e.g., race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality)—without attempting to disapprove or modify it.
  • It remains ever so complexing how horrid and prejudiced commentary from supposed members of mainstream society does not effect any consequences from society at large. Is this an Italian / European mode of thinking? Is mine and others' indignation over the top?
  • Library: Articles & Reviews
    At a time when Italy has transformed itself into a country of arrival, dealing with the issues of social misunderstanding and bigotry that accompany immigration, this anthology reminds Italians of their own citizens who left the country well over a century ago facing innumerable trials and tribulations in their new locales.
  • New York is the most “Italian” city in the US. Adding together Americans of Italian descent and Italian citizens living here, the metropolitan area is home to almost four million Italians—which is among the largest concentration in the world after Sao Paulo, Buenos Aires, Milan, and Rome. This translates into a most robust cultural presence that has its points of reference in a handful of excellent institutions dealing with the Italian and Italian-American experience. In the first of a series, we asked the Dean of the Calandra Institute to describe who they are, what their mission is, and to talk about their many activities.

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