Articles by: Letizia Airos

  • Facts & Stories

    "DireNapoli". Interview with Vincenzo Scotti

    @font-face {
    font-family: "Times";
    }@font-face {
    font-family: "Cambria";
    }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }

    "DireNapoli" is the slogan that will be used during Cardinal Sepe's visit to New York. Naples is a city that speaks to the world of its difficulties but also of its hopes. You understood immediately the message that Cardinal Sepe wanted to bring to New York. What does it mean to you when you hear the words, “Telling Naples”?

    Cardinal Sepe is a reference point in Naples for those who want to take back the city and who want to build a path of growth and development in the entire area. Sepe was able to give a voice to the desires of many Neapolitans who haven’t given up on their city and who want to work to meet the challenges that they face and the realty in front of them. The slogan of the Cardinal’s trip, “DireNapoli” aims to show the realities of Naples that are often not seen on television or discussed in the press but that of the everyday lives of people who look to build a modern city, a civil city, a city that is able to give future generations a reassuring vision of the future.

    Naples is an exceptional city… Not just from a panoramic or natural perspective but also because of its scientific, manufacturing, artistic and cultural traditions. How can we explain these aspects of Naples to the world?  

    Yes, Naples is a beautiful city and not only because of what God has made, the landscape, but also thanks to the efforts of man throughout the centuries. The great artistic patrimony and cultural traditions which have been passed down from the time of the Greeks and Romans  to today is still evident throughout the city.

    Naples is a city where much scientific research is done and where researchers from all over the world are located. There are also manufacturing areas that create niche products not just in traditional food sectors but also in aerospace, prescision mechanics and packaging.

    Naples is very well known for its tailoring as well, for the production of shirts, ties, and leather goods. All of these sectors show the good taste and refined aesthetic for which Naples is famous. Not to mention the wondeful theater, music and great actors of the past and of this current generations. One only has to think of the role that the San Carlo theater has had throughout the centuries.

    During Cardinal Sepe's visit, there will be discussion at the City University of New York, which is a moment to analyze the migrations of people throughout the centuries. In fact, one often. asks. How is it that Italians, of all people, who themselves immigrated to the USA in droves, especially from Southern Italy, have so much difficulty accepting immigrants themselves?" Can you share with us your thoughts on this?

    Certainly the Cardinal’s visit in this particular moment is linked to the problem of immigration, especially in the United States. Naples has been a focal point of emigration in the past and many Neapolitans had difficult experiences but were able to work their way up in the United States to positions of true authority, in politics, in business and finance, in academia and in research.

    What the Neapolitans were able to achieve in the United States, as well as Italians from al over the country, shows just what they are made of. At times, life was surely difficult, but they were able to emerge victorious thanks to their natural gifts and great abilities.

    Today Italy, and the City of Naples certainly, are places which immigrants flock to and we should look at the American experience so that we can have a peaceful cohabitation with immigrants and an integration of their cultures and religions into ours.

    The United States has an important lesson for us to learn. "Don’t be afraid of your fellow man!" We need to understand that immigration is a resource and it can enrich our culture and our religions. We need to understand that other cultures, religions, and ethnicities are not a danger but offer great possibilities for us to enrich our lives, on both sides. We must understand that we can receive something from the other who is not a stranger but another part of ourself: namely, of man. This is the language of the gospel, love your neighbor as you love yourself. The "other" isn’t different than you are but another part of  you.

    Cardinal Sepe is particularly taken with the dialogue between different faiths and cultures both in Italy and abroad.  He was recently in Peking where he brought his message of dialogue between peoples. I believe that the world is in need of this message today. The Cardinal will meet representatives of the Jewish community in New York and young students at a school. Young students need to be aware of the Holocaust and what it was so that it can never happen again.

    Cardinal Sepe will visit the United Nations as well…

    At this precise time, there is considerable worry about Christians and the violence that they have been exposed to in recent times. It isn’t just an issue of Christians though.  In general this is a problem that all International organizations must address, freedom of religion. In the USA, this is a fundamental concept, freedom of religion and tolerance

    Dramatic events happen such as the recent shooting of U.S. Rapresentative Gabrielle Giffords, but  these are isolated incidents. We can in fact learn from the USA examples of tolerance and respect for our fellow citizens. Italy wants the European Union to be the guarantor of this type of religious tolerance and the defender of freedom of religion.  I think the Cardinal is bringing this message to the United Nations to encourage it to be ever more the defender of religious freedom throughout the world.

    You know New York very well. What would you bring from New York to Naples and from Naples to New York?

    I would bring to Naples the organizational capabilites that I find in New York and the growth opportunities that make this city famous. At the end of the day, the American dream is the ability of anyone to dream something and to be able to make something of themselves.  I would like to bring this optimism to Naples, the idea that you should never settle or be resigned to your fate, but that you should work to grow and develop your future. On the other hand, I would like to bring the wonderful openness and solidarity that you find in Naples despite the misery and many difficulties which have always characterized the city. Neapolitans are open and very collegial with one another. This is what makes it possible for so many social classes to live together in harmony there.

    DireNapoli New York    Info Cardinal Sepe's Visit

  • Fatti e Storie

    "DireNapoli" secondo Vincenzo Scotti

    "DireNapoli" è lo slogan che accompagna la visita del Cardinale Sepe a New York. Napoli come città che parla al mondo dei suoi mali, ma anche delle sue speranze. Lei ha subito accolto con calore l’intento di portare questo messaggio del Cardinale a New York. Cosa vuol dire per lei "Dire Napoli"?

    Il Cardinale Sepe costituisce oggi un punto di riferimento a Napoli per un riscatto della città e per sostenere un cammino di crescita e sviluppo di tutta l’area. Sepe ha saputo dare voce alla volontà della maggioranza dei napoletani che non si rassegna, ma vuole lavorare per rispondere alle sfide che la nuova realtà impone. Il titolo del viaggio del Cardinale “DireNapoli” ha proprio questo significato: di raccontare una Napoli che spesso non si vede sulle televisioni e sulla stampa ma è quella che, giorno dopo giorno, cerca di costruire una città moderna, una città solidale, una città in grado di assicurare alle giovani generazioni una prospettiva rassicurante.

    Napoli è anche città di eccellenze… Non solo di carattere naturale e paesaggistico, ma anche di tipo scientifico, produttivo, artistico e culturale. Come si fa a rendere partecipe il mondo anche di questo?

    Si, e non solo per quello che il creatore ha dato: la bellezza naturale del paesaggio. Ma anche quello che gli uomini hanno costruito nei secoli. Il grande patrimonio di arte e cultura dai tempi antichi dei greci e romani fino ad oggi.

    Napoli è anche una città dove la ricerca scientifica ha sedi di particolare eccellenza che vedono la presenza di ricercatori provenienti da tutto il mondo. Vi sono aree della produzione che portano prodotti di nicchia particolarmente significativi non solo in settori tradizionali, quali quello dell’industria agroalimentare, ma anche nei settori avanzati dall’aerospazio, della meccanica di precisione ed infine tutta l’area delle confezioni.

    Napoli è famosa per la sartoria. Per la produzione di camicie e cravatte, della pelletteria. Tutti settori che esprimono il gusto e la raffinatezza di questa città,  poi c’è il teatro e la musica.  Non solo abbiamo il ricordo dei grandi del passato ma anche, e soprattutto, le nuove generazioni emergenti di attori, musicisti.  Il ruolo che il teatro San Carlo ha avuto nel corso dei secoli ed ha ancora oggi.

    Nella visita del Cardinale di Napoli ci sarà un momento di grande valore simbolico legato all’analisi dei problemi delle migrazioni umane, presso la City University di New York. Ci si chiede, alla luce dell'esperienza di dolore e di riscatto di milioni di emigranti italiani negli USA, e soprattutto di tanti meridionali, perchè sia ancora spesso difficile in Italia accettare l'altro. Non averne paura. Vuole condividere con noi le sue riflessioni a riguardo?

    Certamente nella visita del Cardinale ci sarà questo momento di particolare valore simbolico legato proprio all’analisi dei problemi delle migrazioni umane soprattutto negli Stati Uniti. Napoli ha contribuito nel passato all’emigrazione verso gli Stati Uniti e i napoletani sono passati attraverso esperienze difficili e dolorose ma sono anche riusciti ad arrivare a punte di grande responsabilità. Nel campo della politica,  nel campo dell’economia e della finanza, nel campo dell’università e della ricerca.

    Quello che napoletani hanno saputo fare negli Stati Uniti, come anche italiani provenienti di altre regioni,  sta a dimostrare che i napoletani ci sanno fare. Sono passati attraverso prove anche difficili ma alla fine sono emersi con tutte le loro doti e capacità.

    Oggi l’Italia, incluso la città di Napoli,  è un paese di immigrazione e noi guardiamo all’esperienza americana per realizzare nel nostro paese una pacifica convivenza e integrazione tra le diverse etnie culture e religioni.

    Quella degli Stati Uniti è  lezione importante per il nostro Paese e per i nostri concittadini. Non avere paura. Bisogna rendersi conto che l’immigrazione è una risorsa, una ricchezza. Che la pluralità delle culture e delle religioni e delle etnie, lungi dall’essere un pericolo, è una grande possibilità per arricchirsi tutti, reciprocamente.  Dall’altro io posso ricevere qualcosa in più, nella consapevolezza che l’altro non è un diverso da me ma un’altra parte di me stesso. E’ questo il significato poi del linguaggio evangelico: amerai il prossimo tuo come te stesso. L’altro non è un diverso ma un’altra parte di te.

    Il Cardinale Sepe è impegnato particolarmente nel dialogo intereligioso e interculturale in Italia e all’estero. Di recente è stato a Pechino, messaggero di una parola di dialogo. Credo che il mondo abbia bisogno oggi di questo. Il Cardinale si recherà non solo a incontrare i responsabili della comunità ebraica newyorkese ma anche giovani in una scuola. Perché i giovani abbiano la consapevolezza di quello che è stata la Shoah e di quello che bisogna fare perchè non ci sia più un periodo come quello che è stato vissuto negli anni 40.

    E il Cardinale Sepe visiterà anche le Nazioni Unite…

    In questo momento nel mondo vi è una grande preoccupazione per i cristiani e le violenze contro i cristiani. Ma non è solo un problema dei cristiani. E’ un problema in cui gli organismi internazionali e gli Stati devono affrontare per il rispetto della libertà religiosa e per assicurare a tutti i cittadini quello che negli Usa è un dato emblematico: il rispetto e la tolleranza.

    Possono anche avvenire cose drammatiche come l’uccisione di una giovane parlamentare americana per violenza, ma questi sono fatti isolati. C’è invece una grande lezione che viene dagli Usa ed è quella della tolleranza e del rispetto. L’Italia chiede che l‘Europa si faccia paladina di questa difesa della libertà religiosa e credo che il Cardinale porterà un messaggio perché le Nazioni Unite, sempre più diventino paladine di rispetto della libertà religiosa.

    Lei conosce New York molto bene. Cosa porterebbe di New York a Napoli e di Napoli a New York?

    Io porterei a Napoli la capacità di organizzare e la capacità di cogliere ogni possibilità per crescere. In fondo il sogno americano è il sogno proprio di ogni uomo che sa che può se lo vuole crescere e realizzare pienamente se stesso.
     

    Vorrei portare a Napoli questa fiamma di non mai rassegnarsi ma di utilizzare tutte le possibilità per crescere. E vorrei portare a New York quella apertura, quel forte spirito di solidarietà che anche nella miseria e nelle difficoltà è sempre stato un segno distintivo di Napoli. Il napoletano aperto, solidale. Quello che fa convivere insieme ceti sociali diversi ma tutti animati da una volontà e da uno spirito di solidarietà.

    Per maggiori dettagli sulla visita del Cardinale Sepe visita il sito direNapoli.it
     

  • Prima di tutto la passione per la musica

    Parliamo di musica davanti ad una pizza. Di musica di oggi, di ieri. Di 40 anni di carriera con un artista pieno di passione. Passione per la musica.
     
    Ron è a New York per un concerto alla Sullivan Room (218 Sullivan st.) ed un incontro alla Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò.
     
    Comincia subito a raccontare del suo impegno contro la Sla. “Quando si fa questo lavoro bisogna avere la consapevolezza di essere uomini fortunati. Nonostante tutte le difficoltà e gli ostacoli che si incontrano in 40 anni di lavoro. Nel tempo capisci che facendo il musicista puoi anche diventare utile agli altri.
     
    È vero che suoniamo per noi stessi, ma siamo anche responsabili delle canzoni che rimangono nei cuori della gente. Ora quello che mi è successo negli ultimi dieci anni è stato molto significativo. Ho un’amicizia con il dottor Mario Melazzini, malato di Sla. Sono stato al suo fianco, accanto alla sua famiglia. Per un periodo ho anche preso una pausa dal mio lavoro.
    Poi ho capito che proprio il mio lavoro era utile per trovare denaro per la ricerca. Ho trovato in me una forza che non conoscevo.

    E hai contattato i tuoi colleghi…

    Non mi ero mai messo a telefonare ai miei colleghi per chiedere aiuto. Ma in questa occasione l’ho fatto. Ho spiegato cosa avevo provato, quanto era stato devastante vivere insieme agli ammalati diventati miei compagni di viaggio.
    Un disco con tutti questi nomi era una cosa difficilissima, solo da pensare… Ma la motivazione per me era importantissima. I miei colleghi hanno sentito la mia sincerità. E hanno cominciato a rispondere sì. Tanti sì. Ognuno di loro ha cantato insieme a me una mia canzone. Il disco è andato bene in un momento di per sè abbastanza difficile. Ha fatto raccogliere tanti soldi.
    Ho cominciato a considerare il mio lavoro in un altro modo. A non pensare per esempio alle classifiche , a ricordare la motivazione che mi ha fatto scegliere questa strada: la passione. Nient'altro.”

    Passione… una passione comiciata quando eri giovanissimo…
    Sì è cominciato tutto per passione e continua così. Sono nato e cresciuto in un paese che si chiama Garlasco, in provincia di Pavia. Mi piace molto e ho una famiglia meravigliosa lì.

    Mio fratello, quando ero bambino, andava a scuola di pianoforte. La sua maestra insegnava anche canto. Ho cominciato con lei a 13 anni e ho fatto diversi concorsi. Erano selezioni che poi venivano sottoposte a dei talent scout. Un giorno, avevo 15 anni, un discografico mi scoprì. Ero un alunno su un banco di scuola e mi ritrovai di colpo sul palco di Sanremo. Ero uno sconosciuto e improvvisamente non potevo più camminare per strada senza essere riconosciuto. Devo ringraziare la mia famiglia: mi ha sempre fatto tenere i piedi per terra..
     

    Quale è il segreto di un approccio così “sano” ad un mestiere così “ubricante” soprattutto per un giovane?
    “Credo che, senza saperlo, ho affrontato questo lavoro con l’atteggiamento mentale con cui si va a vivere all’estero. Cioè predisposto alla fatica. E’ vero sono andato a Sanremo molto giovane ma non ho avuto vita facile, nè subito e neppure gli anni successivi. E poi sono stato dimenticato almeno tre volte. “

    Dimenticato tre volte. Quando?

    Sì. La prima volta fu dopo “il Gigante e la bambina”. Era il ‘71. Nel ‘73 arrivarono i cantautori. Si contestava ed i testi diventavano molto importanti, troppo. Io allora non scrivevo testi e soprattutto non volevo mischiare la musica con la politica. Si richiedeva una militanza. Per me invece la musica veniva prima di tutto.
     
    Ritornai piano piano fuori con Banana Republic, con Dalla e De Gregori. Anche se soprattutto come arrangiatore. Con la Una città per cantare ricominciai…

    Ma nell’83 mi fermai di nuovo. Non ero convinto delle cose nuove che mi chiedevano. Ho preferito non fare. Poi arrivò Joe Temerario. E un altro momento importante della mia carriera.
     

    Comunque io non sono mai stato considerato un cantautore con la k e per questo ho anche pagato. Ricordo, nel 1973 accadde un episodio che mi fece fermare e riflettere.
    Ci fu un concerto dopo il colpo di stato in Cile. Era a Roma al Palazzo dello Sport. C’erano tutti i cantautori impegnati. Avevo fatto da non molto il “Gigante e la bambina” ….

    Una canzone certo non politica, ma che affronta un tema delicato. Parla di un un giardiniere che violenta una bimba, ispirandosi a un fatto di cronaca realmente accaduto. Fu anche anche censurata… Insomma era scomoda

    Sì ma la mia immagine era legata al Disco per l’estate, alla televisione, al businnes.
    Erano in 10.000 al Palasport e fischiarono la mia esibizione. Nonostante fosse una poesia di Neruda musicata, parlava di morti in piazza.
    Allora mi frenai. Capii che la mia passione per la musica in quel momento si doveva mettere da parte…

    Passione. Questa parola ritorna spesso nella nostra conversazione…

    Ho scritto una Città per Cantare, non a caso. The Road di Jackson Browne. È un pò la mia storia. Quella di chi va in giro a cantare per passione. Nonostante sia difficile.
     
    Passione importante più del successo discografico?
    Sì c’è qualcosa per me più forte: cantare davanti alla gente. Lo preferisco ai dischi. Più di ogni altra cosa. Preferisco salire sul palco. Dopo sono un’altra persona. Viva, che respira in un altro modo. Incidere dischi mi annoia da morire.

     

    Molti dei tuoi successi sono diventati noti con altri interpreti. Come Piazza Grande. Ti sei mai pentito di aver dato una tua canzone? Ti sei mai detto: la potevo cantare io…?
    Una persona che mi sgrida a volte è mia madre: sei andato a dare la canzone a quello lì…
    Piazza Grande. Avevo 17 anni anni e la scrissi insieme a Lucio. E l’anno dopo sentirla cantare da Amalia Rodriguez fu una grande emozione.
    Ma, per esempio,  prendiamo Attenti al lupo, mai avrei pensato di cantarla io. Anche se il testo io non lo avevo considerato come un gioco, come fu poi reso da Lucio. In fondo nel testo il lupo è la vita, il mondo. Ho pensato a persone che vivevano in un mondo piccolo con la paura di uscire di casa, di farsi coinvolgere. Lucio ne ha fatto una canzone  diversa, confezionata anche ironicamente.
     
    L’hai scritta sapendo che non l’avresti cantata?
    Avevo appuntamenti segreti con mia nonna ogni pomeriggio. Segreti perchè le zie erano gelose. Lei mi preparava il the con delle ciambelle…
     
    Un giorno tornando vidi un roseto bellissimo. E la casa da lontano: c’erano delle finestrelle piccole. Mi misi al pianoforte, avevo sentito the EnglishMan in New York di Sting. Con lo stesso tempo, ma accordi e melodia diversa uscì “Attenti al lupo” . Mi vennero musica e testo insieme. La prima volta, non ero mai riuscito a scrivere testo e musica insieme.
     
    E poi cosa successe?
    Mi resi subito conto che era una canzone lontana da me. La misi nel cassetto. Uscì fuori un giorno, insieme ad altre cose che ho fatto sentire a Lucio Dalla. Lui, che esagera sempre, mi disse: ‘Se me la dai vendiamo un milione di dischi!”. E abbiamo venduto un milione e mezzo di dischi!
     
    Ritorniamo alla passione? E’ possible avere passione nel mondo di X Factor?
    Posso parlarti bene di Giusy Ferreri. Il mio produttore era del suo paese. E andava a fare la spesa lì. Venne nel mio studio. 10 anni a far provini. E’ un’autrice fantastica, strepitosa, solo che non gli hanno ancora permesso di mostrarlo. I discografi stanno cauti e le fanno fare cose facili.
     
    Un altro bravo è Marco Mengoni. E' uno con un grande talento e, quando ha raggiunto il successo, non aveva bisogno di imparare niente. Queste cose, quando le hai dentro, le hai.
     
    I talenti arrivano da X Factor. Il problema è che non fa bene alla nostra musica perchè non escono mai autori. C’è gente che scrive bene e nessuno lo sa. Le case discografiche, appena qualcuno ha successo usano quel successo e non danno spazio.

    Potrei dire che, da un certo punto di vista, le case discografiche stanno divenando inutili. Aspettano i nomi che escono da X Factor, cosi non devono investire in ricerca. Poi fanno dischi in fretta, attenti al successo di chi viene dopo. Non hanno interesse a fare in modo che un talento cresca. Sfruttano il momento iniziale.
     

    Colpa anche di Internet?
    No, non credo. In Italia la musica è un optional. A Sanremo, per esempio, non è importante la musica ma lo spettacolo. Vengono tanti ospiti e soprattutto importa l’audience.
     
    Tu hai avuto un buon rapporto con Sanremo. Molti colleghi lo hanno snobbato...
    Ho partecipato era giusto andare. Non ho scritto Vorrei incontrarti tra 100 anni per Sanremo. Poi sono andato a Sanremo con L’ uomo delle stelle per far uscire il disco con tutti gli ospiti con la Sony per la ricerca.
     
    Che rapporto hai con gli Stati Uniti?

    Sono stato qui la prima volta nel ‘71. Cantai al Madison Square Garden con tanti altri. Teatro pieno. Mi strapparono la camicia… Poi andammo a Filadelfia, Atlantic City, Montreal.
    Vidi allora un’America davvero violenta, la notte che arrivammo sulla 42esima strada il mio impatto fu terribile. Sentii degli spari che si avvicinavano, vidi una persona sfrecciare e dietro uno che sparava…
     
    Tornai nell’81. Dieci anni dopo. Fu un viaggio molto diverso. Non lo dimenticherò mai. La casa discografica, dopo Una città per cantare decise che io dovevo stare in mezzo alla musica, collaborare con gli altri. Mi mandarono qui. Presero appuntamenti. Giravamo con la Cadillac pagati dalla RCA. Furono tre mesi pazzeschi. Meravigliosi. Lo scopo era di avere contatti e scambi che non avvennero mai. Andai a cercare Jackson Brown. A Los Angeles. La risposta fu: J.B. on vuol vedere nessuno. Niente.
     
    Poi lo hai conosciuto?
    Si, ma nel 2000. Venne nel mio studio. Si scusò. Fu veramente un bellissimo momento per me. Facemmo un video indimenticabile. Nella Piazza Ducale di Vigevano. Alle 7 di mattina. Con due chitarre suonammo Una città per cantare.
    E come hai trovato questa volta New York?
    Bella. Mi ha subito dato molta energia e tranquillità. Sono andato a Times Square subito. C’era un mare di gente. Rideva, camminava. Mi sono trovato a mio agio tra tanti. Bella atmosfera ovunque. Anche dove si fa musica rispetto all’Italia...
     
    C’è anche un tono quasi triste in quello che dici…
    In Italia io ed i miei colleghi stiamo soffrendo molto. Sembra non esserci spazio. Non puoi andare nei locali e suonare insieme come qui a New York.
    Poi ci sono tanti problemi,  noi cantautori non siamo per esempio praticamente trasmessi dalle radio. Ci sono grandi network e molti stanno facendo le loro etichette discografiche. Nomi come il mio, De Gregori, Dalla, Renato Zero…ecc.. non sono nel loro target.
     
    Ed i dischi non si vendono. E la cosa vale per tutti, anche per chi ha sempre venduto tantissimo. Adesso vai in classifica con 20.000 copie, per cui le case discografiche non investono. Un disco d’oro si fa con 25.000 copie contro le almeno 300.000 di una volta.E gli artisti non vengono più seguiti nella loro dignità di musicista. Nelle loro attitudini.
     
    Esce un disco e ti mandano a fare la pubblicità televisiva nello stesso modo di tutti gli altri. Sempre lo stesso percorso. Non personalizzano niente. Avevo fatto questo disco che si chiamava Voci del mondo, tratto da un libro di Robert Schneider. Un lavoro che andava presentato diversamente, in maniera emozionale. Non è stato fatto.”
     
    Un anticipazione su i tuoi appuntamenti musicali a New York>
    Ci sto lavorando. Alla Casa Italiana parlerò della Sla e suonerò il pianoforte. Io ed il pubblico vicini. Voglio che la gente capisca chi sono.
     

  • Art & Culture

    Music. A Passion Before All

    We speak about music in front of a pizza. About music of today and yesterday. Of a 40-year-long career together with a passionate artist. Passionate about music.

    Ron is in New York for a concert at Sullivan Hall and for an event at Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò, and begins immediately to speak about ALS.
    “When you have this job you must be aware of being lucky. In spite of all the difficulties and the obstacles that you face over forty years. In time you understand that being a musician can become useful for others.
    It is also true that we play for ourselves, but we are also responsible for the songs that remain in people's hearts. What happened to me during the last ten years was quite important. My friendship with doctor Mario Melazzini, an ALS patient, whose side I have stood by, together with his family, and for whom I put my work on hold for some time.
    I then understood that my work was actually useful for raising money. I found an unknown force within me.
     
    And you contacted your colleagues...
     
    I had never phoned my colleagues asking for help. But on this occasion I did. I explained what I was feeling, how devastating it had been to live with the diseased, who had become fellow travelers of mine.

    An album with so many names was a very difficult thing to do, even to think about. But my motivation was the important factor. My colleagues felt my sincerity and began answering Yes. There were many who said Yes. They all sang one song of mine together with me.
    The disc went well especially for a difficult moment, and raised lots of money.
    I began to reconsider my work and not think about charts, recalling the motivation that made me take up this job: passion. That's it.”
     
    Passion... a passion that began when you were very young...
     
    Yes, it all began as passion and continues as such. I was born and grew up in the little town of Garlasco, in the province of Pavia. I like it a lot and I have a marvelous family there. My brother, when I was a child, went to piano lessons. The teacher also taught singing. I began with her when I was 13 years old and I ran in several competitions, which were being followed by talent scouts. One day, when I was 15, I was discovered by a record label. I went from being a schoolboy to Sanremo's stage. From a nobody to someone recognized on the street. I have to thank my family: they always helped me to keep it real.
     
    What was the secret for such a “healthy” approach to such an “inebriating” job, especially for someone so you?
     
    “I think that, without knowing it, I went to live this job as one would live abroad. With efforts. It's true that I was very yound when I first went to Sanremo, but it was very tough, immediately and during the following years. Afterwards I was forgotten at least three times.”
     
    Forgotten three times. When?
     
    Sure. The first time soon after “Il gigante e la bambina”. It was 1971. In 1973 singer-songwriters arrived. People were protesting and lyrics became important, even too important. At the time I wasn't writing lyrics and I especially didn't want to mix music and politics, while a militancy was expected. Music came first, for me.
    I slowly got back on my feet with “Banana Republic” with Dalla and De Gregori, especially as producer
    With “Una citta' per cantare” I began again...
    But in 1983 I stopped again. I wasn't convinced about what was being asked of me. I preferred not doing it. Then came “Joe Temerario”, another important moment of my career.
    Anyway, I was never actually considered a singer-songwriter and I paid the price. In retrospect, the 1973 episode especially made me stop to reflect. There was a concert in the Rome sports center soon after the coup in Chile.
    All the committed singer-songwriters were present. I had recently done “Il gigante e la bambina”.
     
     

    Certainly not a political song, but with a delicate topic. It's about a gardener that rapes a little girl, based on a true story. It was censored... it was disturbing.

     
    Yes. My image was tied to the summer hit, television, business. 10,000 people were at the Palasport and they booed my performance. In spite of it being a poem by Neruda set to music, it was about people dead in piazze.
    So I slowed down. I understood that my passion for music needed to be set aside at that moment...
     
    Passion. This word recurs frequently in our conversation...
     
    I wrote “Una citta' per cantare” for a reason. Jackson Browne's The Road. It is kind of my story, someone moving around singing with passion. In spite of it being difficult.
     
    Is passion more important than success?
     
    Yes. There is something stronger in singing in front of people. I prefer it to recording albums. More than anything else. I prefer walking up on stage and becoming someone else. Someone alive, who breathes in another way. I get bored in a recording studio.
     
    Many of your hits, like “Piazza Grande” have become famous with other performers. Did you ever regret giving one of your songs away? Did you ever tell yourself: “if only I could sing it myself”?
     
    My mother is one of those who nags me: you gave that song to that guy... like “Piazza Grande”, which I wrote when I was 17 together with Lucio. Hearing it sung by Amalia Rodriguez a year later was a huge emotion.
    “Attenti al lupo”, for example, was never intended to be sung by me. Although I hadn't considered the lyrics as a farce, as Lucio made it become. At the end of the lyrics the wolf is life, the world. I thought about people living in a small world, afraid of leaving their homes, of being involved. Lucio ironically turned it into a tailored song.
     
    Did you write it thinking that you would not be singing it yourself?
     
    I had secret meetings with my grandmother every afternoon. Secret because my aunts were jealous. She would prepare cookies and tea...
    One day on my way home I saw a beautiful rose bush. And from afar I could see tiny windows in the house. I sat at the piano. I had recently heard Sting's “The English Man in New York”. In the same tempo, but with different harmonies and melodies, I created “Attenti al lupo”. Music and lyrics came together. The first times, I had never been able to write music and lyrics together.
     
    And what happened then?
     
    I immediately realized that it was distant from me. I put it away and pulled it out one day, together with some other stuff, and played it for Lucio Dalla. He always exaggerates and told me “If you give it to me we'll sell a million records!”. And we sold a million and a half!”
     
    Returning to passion, is it possible to be passionate in the world of Xfactor?
     
    I can speak well about Judy Ferreri. My producer is from her home town. She would go shopping there. She came to my studio for 10 years of auditions. She is a fantastic author, amazing, but they haven't allowed her to prove it, yet. The record industry gets scared and has her do easy stuff.
     
    Marco Mengoni is another good one. He has great talent and never needed anything else when he emerged. These things you either have them or you don't. Talents come out of Xfactor, but the problem is that no authors emerge, and that is bad for our music. Nobody knows those who write well. Record labels don't give any room once someone has success, they just use that success. I could say that in a certain way record labels are becoming useless. They wait for names to come out of Xfactor, so they don't have to invest in research. Then they make albums in a rush and wait for more success. They have no interest in developing a talent to its maximum. Beyond the initial moment.
     
    Is Internet at fault, as well?
     
    I don't think so. Music is optional in Italy. Sanremo is only important for its spectacle, not for its music. There are many guests and certain audience levels must be met.
     
    You had a good relationship with Sanremo. Many colleagues have snubbed it...
     
    I went when it was right to go. I didn't write “Vorei incontrarti tra 100 anni” for Sanremo. I then went to Sanremo with “L'Uomo delle stelle” to release the disc with all the guests together with Sony, in the name of research.
     
    What is your relationship with the United States?
     
    I was here first in 1971. I sang at the Madison Square Garden with many others. The theater was full. They tore my shirt off... then we played in Philadelphia, Atlantic City, and Montreal. I saw a very violent America, then. When I first arrived at 42nd Street the impact I had was terrible. I heard gunshots approaching, and I saw someone running away, chased by a gunman...
    I returned in 1981, ten years later. It was a very different trip. I will never forget it. The record label, after “Una citta' per cantare” decided I had to be at the center of music, collaborate with others. They sent me here. We set up appointments. We drove around in a Cadillac, paid for by RCA. It was three amazing months.
    The point was establishing contacts and exchanges that never materialized. I went to Los Angeles in search of Jackson Brown. The answer I got was: J.B. Doesn't want to see anyone. Nothing.
     
    Did you meet him, then?
     
    Yes, but only in 2000. He came to my studio. He apologized. It was a beautiful momet for me. We made an unforgettable video. In the Piazza Ducale of Vigevano. At 7 in the morning. With two guitars we played “Una citta' per cantare”.
     
    How did you find New York, this time around?
     
    Beautiful. It immediately gave me lots of energy and peace. I went immediately to Times Square. There was a sea of people laughing and walking around. I felt at ease among the multitude. The atmosphere was beautiful everywhere. Even where music is made, unlike Italy...
     
    There is a sad undertone to what you are saying...
     
    In Italy my colleagues and I are suffering. There doesn't seem to be any space. Singer-songwriters are almost never played on the radio. Large networks have emerged and many are launching their own record labels. De Gregori, Dalla, Renato Zero, myself, and many others aren't targets for them.
    And albums don't sell. This applies to everyone, even to those that have always sold a lot. Today one reaches he charts with 20,000 copies, so labels don't invest. 25,000 copies make a Gold Disc, while it used to be 300,000.
    Artists aren't followed anymore in their dignity as a musician, in their aptitudes. If a disc comes out they send you advertising on television as everyone else. Everyone follows the same steps. Nothing is personal.
    I had made an album called “Voci del mondo”, from a book by Robert Schneider. It was an album that needed to be communicated differently, in an emotional way. This didn't happen.”
     
    Can you tell us something about your events in New York?
     
    I'm working on it. At Casa Italiana I will speak about ALS and play the piano, close to the public. I want people to understand who I am.

  •  Eataly entrance
    Life & People

    Farinetti’s Flour

    ITALIAN VERSION

    “My dad kneaded dough, my grandfather was a miller; we’ve been involved with flour for three generations.”

    With these words, Oscar Farinetti begins to tell us about himself through images and memories. The life of Eataly is all around him – the colors, smells, tastes, the humanity of the place has become a tangible reality in a short time. Under his guidance, the store thrives in frenetic New York City. His influence is all around; he makes you stop and think, taste, smell, and understand a culture.

    “I was born in the midst of forty sacks of flour; my first memory of smell is the acidity of the flour. You know, our strongest memories comes from the nose. As human beings we love or hate each other based on our sense of smell. Durum wheat has an extraordinary scent. It expresses protein, gluten, the basic nutrients of our food staple. We Italians base our cuisine on carbohydrates – meals and flours which are made of ground wheat.”

    His intense eyes scrutinize the interlocutor. His words are concrete and open at the same time; they flow freely and cannot be stopped. And so Oscar Farinetti recalls how, at one point in his life, he had to leave the smell of flour behind....

     

     “In 1978, at 24 years of age, I began to work for my dad, who in addition to a pasta factory also owned a coffee roasting plant and supermarkets. He opened the first superstore which also sold non-food products. He hated this aspect of the business, and so he said to me, ‘You’re educated; you deal with that stuff, those home appliances!’”

    “It was a 16 x 13 square foot department with four washing machines, six refrigerators, about a dozen black and white televisions, radios, stereos, etc.”

    “I would rather have been involved with food, but I agreed. My poetic temperament, which always was and will always be within me, prevails over everything and allowed me to fall in love with these products.”

    Farinetti, the great communicator. The ease with which he speaks is astounding, enchanting. His words easily transform into vivid images. His words land on the air around him and live in every detail of the place he created.

    He recalls:
    “When I saw the first washing machine, this magical white box where you throw dirty clothes in and they came out clean – it was an amazing thing! Imagine what I thought of a refrigerator? This cabinet keeps food and, like magic, makes it last longer.”

    “I observed the people to whom I sold a stereo or a television. I was selling happiness, quality of life. I knew right away that electronics would make a difference. It was the last few years of the 1970s. Even then one could imagine that we would not be wrapped around a telephone cord forever, that those Commodore 64s and Amigas would become computers, common appliances. I knew that TV would eventually become interactive and most of all become essential in homes. Home appliances help to save people work, especially women. Irons, washing machines, dishwashers would become more and more wonderful. And so I decided that I would make a great career out of it as a home appliance salesman.”

     
    And the home appliance salesman went on to found UniEuro and Trony.

    “My mission is to spread quality of life – to lighten the work load and to bring joy. That department grew bigger and bigger, and one day I convinced my father to open more stores that sold only appliances. Slowly the brand – UniEuro – became more synonymous with household appliances than with food.”

    “In 1989 I convinced my father to sell all of the family’s food operations to devote myself to a single focus: consumer electronics. In 2002, I succeeded in creating the largest chain of household appliance stores in Italy first with UniEuro and then with Trony. I was handling a Billion euro business with 3,000 employees and 40 managers, and overall it was going very well.”

    But the love for food remained intact, even if it had been set aside for a while.

    “In 1989 I bought two farms and two or three restaurants. The restaurant business has always been a hobby, but I had other priorities.”

    It was his children who brought him back to flour full-time. Unconsciously or not, Oscar Farinetti had sowed something within his family.

    “In 2002 my three children came to me – at the time they were 22, 18, and 14 – and they told me that they had never thought of doing anything else except working with me. I realized that their lives had been determined. That day I decided to sell UniEuro and return to the original family business.”

    Farinetti’s decision reflected the sensitivity of a father who looks beyond financial comfort. He knew that he had to involve his children, allow them to grow, and participate in something new alongside him.

    “In a company that is so big, so important, already finished, already alive, my children would always be ‘Oscar’s kids.’ They would not have had the privilege of sharing the hopes, emotions, fears, and the adrenaline of building a business. Imagine the level of adrenaline we had here in the 60 days before Eataly New York opened....”

    “And so with my children we wrote this new story. In short, we sold. It took a lot of money, about 500 million euro – not because I’m fond of things but I like to give them a value, certainly not for money, but to show that over a period of time I’ve done something tangible in my life.”

    “And so I left to build Eataly from scratch. I had been thinking about this since 2002. In 2000 I designed the first Eataly in Turin, which I then opened in January 2007.”

    It took all that time?

    “It takes a long time to do the research. A project is divided into two parts: the research and then the actual construction. The research is the most important part, that’s where you can never make a mistake. If you’re wrong in the research, you go off in the wrong direction and then you’re screwed. If you do the research but then go wrong in the construction, that’s not a problem; you go back for a few months and you redo it. The research is the vision for the scenario. It goes like this: we research a scenario, a market; I have my own algorithm for doing it, and sooner or later you find a way in. The goal is to find a breakthrough, a way to approach the market in a way that others have not considered. It must be simple, banal. There are still a lot of simple things to be invented.”

    “We’re not finding them because we are focusing on complicated matters, thinking that complication is more modern than simplicity. But complication is an old and stupid art, while the art of the future lies in the difficulty of being simple. Around here you will find a lot of signs that say, ‘It’s difficult to be simple.’”

    The breakthrough that was lacking in this case was an informal but authoritative place.

    “There were formal places with very expensive, fancy products for serious devotees, with very few written descriptions but a lot of oral explanation.”

    “There were also informal places with mediocre products where people enjoyed the atmosphere but they could not find the right products. There was no combination of professional restaurants and high quality merchandise.”

    We also suggest that it lacked culture....

     

    “Well done; you noticed it. In most stores, there is a lack of information. It’s always been said that school is one thing and the market is another. This is wrong. I think that if we succeed in having customers study the product at the time of purchase – this is best experience in life. So I created a place based on Italian food that integrates a marketplace with education and restaurants.”

     

    Thus Eataly Turin was born.

    “We had to look for suppliers, employees, etc., and we opened on January 27, 2007. From day one, it’s been a resounding success because this is a universal format.”

    Throughout the interview, one pearl of wisdom follows another:

    “You see, we merchants suffer from a lack of creativity. We submit to the creativity of those who invent a product – we buy it ready-made, we put it on a shelf, and we think that the mere fact of putting it on a shelf allows us to enjoy an added value. Then we submit to the creativity of those who come to buy it, those who exercise great creativity in their choices. And so we are stuck in the middle.”

    “Many merchants complain that they do not earn a lot, but in reality they don’t really display any kind of creativity; they think that they should enjoy the added value simply because they are in the middle. You’ll recognize them because they always complain about the scenario, and it’s always everyone else’s fault.”

    “If people don’t buy and they don’t come into their shops it’s because they’re stupid. They are never wrong, or it’s the fault of the suppliers who are too expensive or the state that makes people pay too many taxes. It’s always somebody else’s fault.”

     
    “Today there are two types of people. There are those who always blame the scenario, the new false optimists. It’s never their fault. And then there are those who are always sure of themselves.”

    “People no longer express doubt, only certainty. One can have a casual notion about something, without educating oneself, without going deeper. From that day forward, if someone is sure enough of him or herself, he or she can go around talking about that thing with the air of expert.”

    “So there is this overarching presence of certainty on the one hand and too much self-assurance on the other; therefore others always make mistakes but they themselves never do.”

    Uncertainty is an important word for Farinetti.

    “It creates opens a huge opening for those of us who are humble and who love being full of doubt and uncertainty. When something doesn’t work, we always ask ourselves where we went wrong, and we have a simple, open road in front of us.”

    “I’ve applied this concept to my entire life. If you write about this interview and say crazy nonsense the first thing I’m going to ask myself is, ‘Where did I go wrong in communicating?’ I won’t think about how you misunderstood my words. No. I’ll think about what I did wrong.”

    “I always feel a sense of duty within me that overrides everything else. But over the years I’ve also learned to combine duty with pleasure. And that’s helped me a lot.”

    “And I must reveal something about this store. Every time I open a shop, and I’ve opened 106 in 30 years, I’ve always had the habit of dedicating it to a metaphysical value. Eataly New York is dedicated to the supremacy and the value of doubt over certainty.”

    “And so you come in and there’s a sign that reads, ‘Our Policy.’”

    “I’ve noticed that Americans are a bit fixated on this. The first rule is that the customer is always right. But it’s not true.”

    “I had them write, ‘First rule: the customer is not always right. Second rule: Eataly is not always right. Third rule: Harmony will come from this wonderful doubt because harmony is created by doubt.’”

    “If we both have doubts you will stay and listen to me and I will listen to you. And then the doubt becomes curiosity, it becomes intelligence, but it also becomes harmony.”

    “Then there’s another sign with Joe, Lidia, Mario, and me that reads, ‘Thanks for coming in. We made Eataly for you but also for us. We’re not sure that you noticed everything. We actually think that there are some things that are wrong, but rest assured: we will change them.’”

    “And at the exit there’s another sign: ‘No one is perfect, including Eataly. We already apologize, even before you open the packages.’ We are saying: we definitely made some mistakes. Forgive us. But tell us where we went wrong.”

    And so began a wonderful story with Eataly. As he speaks, it almost seems to be a tale told by a storyteller from of the past, but luckily we are in the present.

    “It’s been an extraordinary, unstoppable avalanche. It has no limits. It’s a universal format. The ultimate goal for a market to succeed is to build a universal format. For example, Autogrill is the world’s largest chain of roadside restaurants. But an Italian Autogrill is completely different than an English one.”

    “Eataly has this feature. Turin is the same as here, Tokyo is also the same, but with a newness that comes from the fact that I love literature, poetry, I love books that differ from each other, and so the same exact format bores me. On the basis of a universal format, I instilled a metaphysical quality into each Eataly in order to personalize each one and give it something special.”

    “So it happens that the one in Bologna, which won the most beautiful store in the world award at the Innovation Retail fair in Berlin, is actually a 6,500 square foot library with a small, 2,000 square foot Eataly inside, but when you’re in those 2,000 feet, it’s as if you’re at the one in New York.”

    “Rome’s Eataly, which will open on December 9 next year, will be connected to a theater, il Teatro Valle.”

    “New York’s Eataly is related to the concepts of integration and biodiversity with respect to human beings and food. In New York I believe I understood, ultimately, why these people have become the most powerful in the world. The reason is simple: they have accepted integration. The integration of these people has created mammoth power, the opposite of what the Northern League claims.”

    “I also realized that human biodiversity has moved to biodiversity in products. I began to notice that there were Swiss cardoons. And I wondered, what are Swiss cardoons? Or French spinach…?”

    “I understood that over the 400 year history of New York, the French brought their spinach here which was added to local varieties, and it’s the same for the Swiss cardoon. I studied American fruits and vegetables, I studied fish from the Gulf of New York, I studied meat from Montana. I studied the extraordinary American flour and this incredible milk. And I decided that New York’s Eataly would be the result of an integration of American raw material and Italian know-how.”

    And he goes back to bread....his bread...almost like closing a magic circle.

    “Take my bread – it’s crazy. An American Slow Food fanatic makes this organic stone ground flour that’s very similar to what we at Eataly use in Italy. Then the germ, the yeast, is Italian, and so we gave it this stamp. I brought it illegally from Italy in a bag – and if I were caught with it I would have gone to jail – this living material is 30 year old Italian yeast. The oven comes from Barcelona, because the Spaniards are the best at combining wood-burning cooking methods with cleanliness and ease.”

    “And then my chef, the head of bread at Eataly Turin, I brought him here. He left three days ago; he’s Romanian. So consider this American flour with Italian yeast in a Spanish oven made by a Romanian man.”

    “It’s the ultimate, and it’s the most delicious bread in the world. It is the world. And the same goes for our pizza, for our fish that comes here from the gulf but that’s cooked with our olives and capers. And so it is for everything else.”

     

    Lastly, a question about Nichi Vendola comes up. In his recent but brief trip to New York, he was sure to stop in at Eataly.

    The president of the region of Puglia, as enthusiastic as a little kid, wanted a tour of Eataly and Oscar Farinetti showed him around like an old friend, describing every corner of his wonderland.

    “I have a good relationship with all Italian politicians despite my heritage; as the son of a partisan leader, leaning to the left politically is in my genes. But I also have friends who are on the right and I have very good relationships with them. With Nichi, I share the attitude of trying to put a little poetry into everything I do. It’s fundamental. When you succeed, you create this magic that appeals to people.”

    We say good-bye to Oscar Farinetti. For him, it’s more important to sell values than to sell products. Is this the secret to his success?

    “I cannot tell a lie. I cannot sell you a tomato, claiming that it’s a San Marzano tomato when in fact it’s an ordinary tomato from Puglia. If you have these values you cannot tell lies. Real marketing that works is the truth. Especially during times of economic crisis, liars don’t do well. When people ask me, ‘Can you give some good business tips?’ I reply, ‘Tell the truth. Telling the truth pays off.’”

  • L'ingresso di Eataly
    Fatti e Storie

    Pane per tre generazioni. Oscar Farinetti e la poesia di Eataly

    >> ENGLISH VERSION

    “Mio papà faceva la pasta, mio nonno era un mugnaio, ci siamo occupati di farina per tre generazioni.”

    Oscar Farinetti comincia a raccontarsi con queste parole e va avanti tra immagini e ricordi. Intorno a lui il presente ed il futuro, la vita di Eataly. I colori, gli odori, i sapori, le umanità di un luogo che è diventato in pochissimo tempo una realtà pulsante. Un'oasi che vive nella New York più frenetica. Che fa fermare a riflettere, assaporare, annusare, conoscere.

    “Nasco in mezzo a quaranta sacchi di semola, il mio primo ricordo olfattivo è l’acidità della semola. Lo sai, nella nostra memoria il ricordo più forte è  quello che viene dal naso. Noi stessi esseri umani ci amiamo o odiamo per l’odore che sentiamo l’un l’altro. È un profumo straordinario quello del grano duro. Esprime le proteine, il glutine, le ceneri del nostro alimento principe. Noi italiani basiamo la nostra cucina sui carboidrati e quindi sulle semole e le farine, che sono il grano tenero macinato.”

    Occhi intesi che scrutano l’interlocutore, parole ferme e libere al tempo stesso. Scorrono da sole, non si può interrompere. E così Oscar Farinetti ricorda come poi, in un certo momento della sua vita, ha dovuto lasciare quell’odore di semola…

    “Nel 1978, quindi a 24 anni, comincio a lavorare da mio papà che oltre al pastificio aveva anche una torrefazione di caffè e supermercati. Aprì il primo ipermercato, anche con prodotti non alimentari. Lui odiava questo compartimento e mi disse: tu che hai studiato, occupati di quella roba lì, gli elettrodomestici!

    Era un repartino di 5x4 metri con quattro lavatrici, sei frigoriferi una decina di televisori in bianco e nero, delle radio e degli stereo di allora… Avrei preferito occuparmi di cibo, ma accettai. L’indole poetica, che c’era e c’è sempre stata in me, prevale su tutto e mi fa innamorare anche di questi prodotti.”

    Grande comunicatore Farinetti. La naturalezza con cui parla stupisce sempre. Incanta. Le sue parole diventano immagini facilmente. Espressioni fonetiche che si poggiano sull’aria che ha intorno e vivono in ogni particolare del luogo che ha creato.

    E racconta: “La prima lavatrice, questa scatola bianca magica dove butti roba sporca ed esce pulita, mi è sembrata subito una cosa straordinaria! Immaginate che cosa ho pensato poi di un frigorifero? Questo armadio che conserva cibi e, come per magia, li fa durare più dei tempi naturali.

    Osservavo la gente a cui vendevo un impianto stereo o una televisione. Vendevo gioia, qualità della vita. Ho capito subito che i passi da gigante che avrebbe fatto l’elettronica. Erano gli ultimi anni 70. Già allora si poteva intuire che non ci saremmo intorcinati per sempre intorno ad un filo del telefono, che quei Commodore 64 e Amiga sarebbero diventati un computer, un elettrodomestico di casa. Sentii che la tv prima o poi sarebbe stata interattiva e soprattutto compresi la sfera dei bisogni.

     

    Gli elettrodomestici servono a togliere la fatica alla gente e soprattutto alle donne. Ferri da stiro, lavatrici, lavastoviglie, sarebbero diventati sempre più meravigliosi. E così che decisi che da grande avrei fatto quel mestiere lì: l’elettrodomesticaro.”

    E l’elettodmesticaro fonda UniEuro, Trony:

    “La mia mission è diffondere qualità della vita: togliere la fatica, dare gioia. Quel reparto divenne sempre più grande e un giorno convinsi mio padre ad aprire altri negozi solo di elettrodomestici. Man mano il marchio – UniEuro – divenne più importante per gli elettrodomestici che per il cibo.

    Nell’89 convinco mio padre a vendere tutte le attività alimentari di famiglia per dedicarmi ad un mestiere unico: l’elettronica da consumo. Tra l’89 e il 2002 riesco a costituire la più grande catena di elettrodomestici bianchi in Italia: UniEuro, poi Trony. Nel 2002 avevo circa 1 mld di euro di giro d’affari, 3000 dipendenti, una quarantina di dirigenti… Insomma andava benissimo.”.

    Ma l’amore per il cibo rimane intatto. Anche se per un pò solo nel cassetto.
     

    “Nell’89 mi comprai due aziende agricole, 2 o 3 ristoranti. La ristorazione è sempre stato il mio hobby, ma allora  avevo un’altra priorità.”
     

    Saranno i figli a riportarlo di nuovo ad occuparsi di 'farina' a tempo pieno. Inconsciamente o no, Oscar Farinetti aveva seminato qualcosa in famiglia.

    “Nel 2002 vennero da me i miei tre figli, all’epoca avevano 22 -18 e 14. Mi dissero che non avevano mai pensato ad altro che lavorare con me. Capii che la loro vita era disegnata. Quel giorno decisi che avrei venduto UniEuro per tornare al mestiere di famiglia.”

    Nella decisione di Farinetti la sensibilità di un padre che guarda al di là delle convenienze semplicemente economiche.  Sa che deve coinvolgere i figli, farli crescere e partecipare con lui a qualcosa di nuovo.

    “In un’azienda così grande, così importante, già fatta, già viva, i miei figli sarebbero sempre rimasti i figli di Oscar. Poi non avrebbero avuto il privilegio di partecipare alle speranze, alle emozioni, alle paure, all’adrenalina della costruzione di un’azienda. Pensate che adrenalina abbiamo avuto qui in quei sessanta giorni che hanno preceduto l’apertura …”

    “Così con i miei figli abbiamo costruito questa nuova storia. Insomma abbiamo venduto. Presi un sacco di soldi (perché non mi affeziono alle cose ma mi piace dargli un valore, non certo per il denaro, ma per dimostrare che in quel periodo della vita ho combinato una cosa che è percepita), erano circa 500 milioni di euro.

    E sono ripartito allora da zero per costruire Eataly. Era dal 2002 che pensavo a questa roba. Nel 2000 ho disegnato il primo Eataly di Torino che ho poi aperto a Gennaio 2007.”

    Tutto questo tempo? Gli chiediamo.

    “Ci vuole molto tempo a fare l’analisi. Un progetto si divide in due parti: l’analisi e poi la costruzione vera e propria.

    L’analisi è la parte più importante, che non devi mai sbagliare. Se tu sbagli l’analisi parti nella direzione sbagliata e sei fottuto. Se indovini l’analisi e poi sbagli la costruzione non è un problema: torni indietro qualche mese e la rifai.

    L’analisi è la visione dello scenario. Si fa così: si analizza uno scenario, un mercato, io ho un mio algoritmo per farlo, e prima o poi trovi una breccia. L’obiettivo è trovare una breccia: un modo di affrontare quel mercato a cui gli altri non hanno pensato. Dev’essere semplice, banale. C’è ancora una marea di cose semplici da inventare.

    Non le troviamo perché andiamo su ragionamenti complicati pensando che la complicazione sia più moderna della semplicità. Invece la complicazione è un’arte antica e stupida, mentre l’arte del futuro è la difficoltà di essere semplici. Qui intorno trovate un sacco di cartelli con scritto: it’s difficult to be simple.”

    La breccia in questo caso che mancava era un posto informale ma autorevole. “C’erano luoghi formali con prodotti per fighetti del gusto, per appassionati, molto cari, poca descrizione scritta, molta descrizione orale.

    C’erano luoghi informali con prodotti mediocri dove la gente si trovava meglio come ambiente ma non trovava i prodotti giusti. Non vi era quest’abbinamento altamente professionale tra ristorazione e vendita”.

    E mancava la cultura. Gli suggeriamo...

    “Brava, hai centrato: nei luoghi di vendita mancava la didattica. Si è sempre pensato che la scuola è una roba, il mercato un’altra. Questo è sbagliato. Ho capito che se riusciamo a fare studiare il prodotto nel momento dell’acquisto è il massimo della vita. E quindi ho creato un luogo basato sul cibo italiano che integrasse mercato con ristorazione e didattica.”

    Nasce così Eataly Torino, con un grande lavoro di costruzione:

    “Andiamo a cercare i fornitori i collaboratori ecc. e apriamo il 27 gennaio 2007. Dal primo giorno abbiamo un successo clamoroso, perché questo è un format universale.”

    Nel corso dell’intervista tante pillole di saggezza. Eccone un’altra:

     “Vedi: noi mercanti soffriamo di una sindrome di mancanza di creatività. Noi subiamo la creatività di chi inventa un prodotto, lo compriamo già fatto, lo mettiamo su uno scaffale e per il solo fatto che lo mettiamo su uno scaffale pensiamo di goderne di un valore aggiunto. Poi subiamo la creatività di chi viene a comprarlo, che esibisce una grande creatività  nella scelta. E quindi siamo lì in mezzo.

    Molti mercanti si lamentano che non guadagnano, ma in realtà non sfoggiano nessun tipo di creatività, pensano che debbano godere di un valore aggiunto solo per il fatto che sono in mezzo. Li riconosci perché si lamentano sempre dello scenario, è sempre colpa degli altri.

    Se la gente non compra e non va nei loro locali è perché è stupida. Loro non sbagliano mai, oppure la colpa è dei fornitori troppo cari o dello Stato che fa pagare troppe tasse. E’ sempre colpa di qualcun altro.

    Oggi ci sono due tipi di persone. Quelli che danno sempre la colpa allo scenario, i nuovi falsi ottimisti. Non è mai colpa loro.  E quelli pieni di certezze.

    La gente non esibisce più dubbi, solo certezze. Ci si fa una piccola idea di una roba, senza informarsi, senza approfondire. Da quel giorno si ha la certezza su quella roba e si va a raccontarla in giro, in giro anche con un senso politico. Quindi a causa di questa troppa presenza di certezze e autostima, gli errori sono sempre di altri e mai di se stessi.”.

    E 'ncertezza' è una parola importante per Farinetti.

    “Si apre  così una breccia enorme per noi umili che amiamo essere pieni di dubbi, di incertezze, che quando una roba non va ci domandiamo sempre dove abbiamo sbagliato, e abbiamo un’autostrada davanti, molto semplice.

    Questo è un concetto che ho applicato a tutta la mia vita. Se quando voi scriverete questa intervista direte delle stupidaggini pazzesche, io la prima cosa che mi domanderò è: dove ho sbagliato a comunicare? Non penserò: guarda come hanno capito male le mie parole. No. Penserò dove ho sbagliato io.

    Sento sempre all’interno di me il dovere che prevale sul resto. Ma ho negli anni anche imparato a coniugare il dovere con il piacere. E ciò mi aiuta moltissimo.”

    “E ti devo rivelare una cosa su questo negozio. Io, ogni volta che apro un negozio, ne ho aperti 106 in 30 anni, ho sempre avuto l’abitudine di dedicarlo ad un valore metafisico. Eataly NY è dedicato alla supremazia del valore del dubbio rispetto a quello delle certezze.

    E quindi entri  e trovi un cartello con scritto “our policy”. Ho notato che gli americani in questo sono un pò monotoni: prima regola il cliente ha sempre ragione. Ma non è vero.

    Ho fatto scrivere: prima regola, il consumatore non ha sempre ragione. Seconda regola: neanche Eataly ha sempre ragione. Terza regola: da questo meraviglioso dubbio nascerè la nostra armonia. Perché l’armonia nasce dai dubbi.
     

    Se entrambi abbiamo dei dubbi tu mi stai ad acoltare e io ti ascolto. E allora il dubbio diventa curiosità, diventa intelligenza, ma soprattutto diventa armonia.

    Poi c’e’ un altro cartello con Gio, Lidia, Mario, (Gio e Lida Bastianich, Mario Batali suoi soci americani), io con scritto: grazie per essere entrati. Abbiamo fatto Eataly per voi ma anche per noi. Non siamo così sicuri di aver centrato tutto ,anzi secondo noi ci sono delle robe sbagliate, ma state tranquilli: cambieremo.

    E all’uscita c’è un altro cartello: nessuno è perfetto, neanche Eataly. Già chiediamo scusa, prima ancora che aprano i pacchetti. Stiamo dicendo: di sicuro abbiamo fatto qualche errore. Perdonateci. Però diteci dove abbiamo sbagliato. “

    Con Eataly dunque è cominciata una storia meravigliosa. Mentre parla sembra di ascoltare quasi il racconto di un cantastorie di altri tempi.  Ma siamo nel presente. E che presente.

    “E’ stata una valanga straordinaria irrefrenabile. Non ha limiti. E’ un format universale. Il massimo obiettivo per un mercato è riuscire a costruire un format universale. Esempio: Autogrill è la più grande catena del mondo di ristorazione stradale.

    Ma quello italiano è diverso da quello americano che è completamente diverso da quello inglese.

    Eataly ha questa caratteristica. A Torino è uguale a qui, a Tokio lo stesso, però con questa novità mia che deriva dal fatto che io che amo la letteratura, la poesia, amo i libri diversi l’uno dall’altro e quindi il format tutto uguale poi mi dà fastidio. Su questa base di universalità del format, ho installato accanto un ragionamento metafisico di personalizzare ogni Eataly con qualcosa di speciale.

    E quindi succede che quello di Bologna, premiato più bel negozio del mondo da Innovation Retail a Berlino, è in realtà una libreria di 2000 metri quadri con dentro un’Eataly piccola di 600 metri, ma quando sei in quei 600 metri sembra di essere qui.

    L’eataly di Roma, che apriremo il 9 dicembre del prossimo anno, sarà unita a un teatro, il teatro Valle.

    Eataly di NY è legato al concetto dell’integrazione e alla biodiversità umana e nei cibi. A New York ho creduto di capire, ultimamente, perchè questo popolo è diventato potente nel mondo. Il motivo è semplice: ha accettato l’integrazione. L’integrazione tra i popoli ha creato una potenza bestiale, il contrario di quello che la Lega dice.

    Ho capito anche che questa biodiversità umana si è trasferita nei prodotti, ho cominciato a vedere che ci sono gli swiss cards. E mi sono chiesto: ma che sono i cardi svizzeri? O gli spinaci francesi…

    Ho capito che in 400 anni di storia i francesi hanno portato qui i loro spinaci, che si sono aggiunti alle varietà locali e così anche per il cardo svizzero. Ho studiato l’ortofrutta americana, ho studiato il pesce del golfo di NY, ho studiato le carni del Montana. Ho studiato la farina straordinaria americana e questo latte incredibile. E ho deciso che l’Eataly di NY sarebbe stato frutto di un’integrazione tra la raw material americana e il savoir faire italiano.”

    E torna al pane… al suo pane… sembra quasi chiudersi un circolo magico.

    “Pensate al mio pane: è pazzesco, c’è la farina americana di questo fanatico di Slow Food che fa questa farina organica macinata a pietra, molto simile a quella che noi (Eataly) usiamo in Italia. Poi lo sperma, il lievito, è italiano e quindi abbiamo dato questo timbro.
     

    Mi sono portato dall’italia in una borsa in nero - che se mi pigliavano mi mandavano in galera -questa materia viva che è il lievito italiano vecchio di 30 anni. Il forno arriva da Barcello, perchè gli spagnoli sono stati i più bravi a coniugare la cottura a legna con la pulizia e con la semplicità.
     

    E poi il mio chef, il mio capo del pane a Torino che ho fatto venire qua. E’ andato via tre giorni fa, è rumeno. Quindi pensate questa farina americana con il lievito italiano, il forno spagnolo e un uomo rumeno che lo fa.
     

    E’ il massimo, è il pane più buono del mondo. E’ il mondo. E così per la nostra pizza, per il nostro pesce che è qua del golfo, ma cucinato con le nostre olive e capperi. E così per tutto il resto.”

    E alla fine ci scappa anche una domanda su Nichi Vendola che nel suo recente brevissimo passaggio a New York  non si è fatto mancare una visita ad Eataly.
     

    Il presidente della Regione Puglia, entusiasta come un ragazzino, ha voluto fare un tour e Oscar Farinetti lo ha accompagnato da vecchio amico. Descrivendogli ogni angolo del suo paese delle meraviglie (Vedi foto nello slide show).

    “Ho un buon rapporto con tutti i politici italiani  a prescindere dalla mia origine. Sono figlio di un comandante partigiano  e quindi sono orientato a sinistra geneticamente.

    Ma ho anche amici di destra e con loro ho un rapporto molto buono. Con Nichi ho in comune l’attitudine a cercare di mettere un pò di poesia in quello che faccio. E’ fondamentale. Se ci riesci crei un magia che piace alle persone”

    Salutiamo Oscar Farinetti. Sembra sia più importante vendere valori che prodotti. E’ questo il segreto del suo successo?
     

    “Non riesco a raccontarti una bugia. Non riesco a venderti un pomodoro dicendoti che è un san Marzano e invece è un qualsiasi pomodoro pugliese. Se hai questi valori non puoi raccontare bugie. Il vero marketing che funziona è quello della verità. Nei momenti di crisi soprattutto, il furbettino non ha la meglio. Quando mi chiedono: che idee mi dà per fare un buon mercato? Io rispondo: dì la verità. Dire la verità paga.”

  • Opinioni

    Scusateli se sono giovani

    Lo scenario è questo. Una redazione di giovani giornalisti (almeno secondo il criterio americano) decide, insieme al direttore, di intervistare Nichi Vendola, presidente della Regione Puglia e personaggio di punta nel mondo sinistrato della sinistra italiana.

    Il piano è quello di incontrarlo prima del suo intervento alla Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò della NYU e farlo parlare senza entrare nel politichese italiano, di presentarlo in poche parole ai lettori di i-Italy. Italiani, americani ed italo-americani, che il più delle volte poco sanno dell’imbroglio politico italiano. E usiamo la parola “imbroglio” per dire imbrogliato, difficile da sbrogliare per i non iniziati.

    Per questo un magazine come il nostro, che vuole raccontare l’Italia “italiana” e l’Italia “americana”, ha non poche difficoltà a farlo con chiarezza. I temi della politica dovrebbero essere temi di tutti, ma sembra che in Italia non vada proprio così.

    Ma torniamo alla redazione. Si riunisce ed imposta le domande per l’On. Vendola. Sa di avere a disposizione poco tempo. Il suo scopo è  realizzare un filmato di meno di dieci minuti che riesca a parlare ad un pubblico anglofono.

    Dunque, grazie al direttore della Casa Italiana, Stefano Albertini, riesce ad avere un’aula a disposizione. Nichi Vendola farà una conferenza alle sei nell'auditorio, l’intervista collettiva è poco prima.

    Per Nichi Vendola si prepara un bagno di folla, e moltissimi vengono prima delle sei. Anche alcuni giornalisti italiani. Ma nessun problema, l’incontro della redazione di i-Italy può essere pubblico. L’importante è non rompere la scaletta delle domande, lo scopo è quello di realizzare un video.

    Comincia cosi la conversazione/intervista. Il presidente della Regione Puglia risponde. Nel frattempo, intorno, molti dei colleghi italiani che abbiamo "ospitato" nell'aula prendono appunti, ascoltano, fotografano.

    Questo è lo scenario. Ma vorremmo dire l’antefatto. Andiamo al motivo di questo “sfogo” che porta a rompere una regola: quella di scrivere meno commenti possibile come direttore e lasciar parlare la redazione.

    Tutto comincia infatti quando un collega (si dice il peccato, ma non il peccatore) afferma: “Ma che, porti i ragazzini ad intervistare Vendola?”  E tutto finisce con un breve lancio dell’Ansa, dove riportando una risposta di Vendola ad i-Italy, si parla di “studenti” che intervistano il presidente della Regione. Omettendo però chi erano questi “studenti” e da dove venissero fuori. (E il giorno dopo, la stessa notizia, con lo stesso velato tono, viene ripresa perfino da Marco D'Eramo sul Manifesto!)

    Ecco lo vogliamo dire. Tra la frase del collega e la pubblicazione del lancio dell’Ansa c’è un mondo, un giornalismo italiano che proprio non ci piace.
     
    E dietro tutto questo ci sono interessi che calpestano energie vitali che spesso provengono dalle giovani generazioni.
     
    Chiedete ad un americano se in una fascia di età tra i 25 ed i 31 anni non si può essere considerati giornalisti. E non solo “studenti” o “stagisti”, guardati dall’alto in basso. Osservateli i volti dei commentatori e degli analisti della CNN o di MSNBC. “Sbarbatelli” direbbero alcuni. O giovani brillanti? A cui è stata data fiducia, invece di traparne le ali facendone poi dei cinquantenni frustrati, come tanto spesso avviene in Italia.
     
    La nostra redazione era una giovane redazione (secondo i parametri gerontocratici italiani!), e il direttore ha deciso di non fare il protagonista. Ed ha anche deciso di non affidare l’intervista ai collaboratori più “consolidati” della testata. Ha scelto di rendere i più giovani protagonisti. Sconvolge tanto tutto questo? Sa tanto di gita scolastica? O non sarà che siamo un giornale online? Un “sito web”… è ancora roba da studenti per gli italiani… :-)
     
    Ci chiediamo: un giornalismo corporativo dominato dalla terza età, sostenuto dai soldi pubblici più che dai lettori, con scuole di giornalismo accessibili a pochi, che fa sudare e pagare per essere ammessi ad un praticantato, che relega i giovani all’ultimo scalino della piramide, quasi vergognandosene, eppure sfrutta il lavoro degli stagisti, senza mai dare soddisfazione… Un giornalismo che ha dimenticato l’importanza di quell’apprendistato quasi da bottega, nelle piccole testate, che pure ha dato luce alle migliori firme… E’ ancora un giornalismo sano? E’ in sintonia con la realtà che lo circonda, capace di raccoglierla e raccontarla attraverso un pluralismo di voci?
     
    E tornando un secondo alle difficoltà di accesso alla professione ci piace ricordare una battuta di Vendola alla Casa Italiana. Ad una giornalista de Il Fatto Quotidiano che gli rimproverava  di non aver usato la parola meritocrazia ha replicato: “Se sei nato in una casa in cui ci sono mille libri  e l’educazione alla musica e al cinema, è molto più facile presentarsi  gonfi di qualche merito rispetto a chi è nato invece in una condizione di abbandono e miseria culturale. Per questo bisogna anche intervenire, non solo puntare sul talento individuale. Non tutti hanno la fortuna di poter costruire. Una meritocrazia che non faccia anche il discorso sull’abbattimento delle barriere sociali è un discorso a metà. Mettiamoli tutti e due insieme. Merito, ma anche abbattimento delle ingiustizie sociali.”
     
    Ecco, in Italia oggi accedono al giornalismo soprattutto coloro che hanno quei libri in casa, che possono farsi pagare una scuola, permettersi anni di lavoro a tempo pieno senza essere stipendiati.
     
    Non diciamo che negli USA sia una passeggiata diventare giornalista, ma sicuramente non è necessario essere iscritti ad un Ordine, se proponi idee nuove non è tanto facile per la vecchia guardia metterti sotto… Se apri un blog non vieni demonizzato. Magari la sera lavori in un ristorante, ma di giorno combatti per diventare quello che vuoi essere. Se sei giovane, poi, hai addirittura dei punti in più! E non parliamo di Internet. Grazie alla faciltà con cui questo paese, almeno, accoglie il nuovo.
     
    Ok. Era solo un sassolino da togliersi dalle scarpe, amici come prima. i-Italy continua a fare il suo onesto lavoro, senza Ordini, senza finanziamenti a pioggia, o ad hoc. E lo fa  sulla rete, cercando sostegno di chi apprezza il nuovo. Con l’appoggio dei propri lettori. E dei propri collaboratori. Scusateli se sono giovani.

     ***
     

    Per la cronaca, come si dice in gergo: i-Italy è una testata registrata al Tribunale di Roma, bilingue e con la maggior parte della redazione a New York. Da quando è nata, insieme alla sua community italica.us, ha avuto quasi 2 milioni di hits, il mese scorso abbiamo sfiorato le 90,000 "unique pageviews." I nostri video sul canale YouTube (www.youtube.com/iitaly) sono stati visti 160,000 volte. E oltre 8,000 splendidi amici ci seguono ogni giorno su Facebook (www.facebook.com/iitaly). Siamo la più seguita realtà editoriale bilingue dedicata all'Italia e all'Italia americana che esista sulla rete. Tutto senza un soldo del finanziamento pubblico all'editoria, italiana o estera. E grazie ad una redazione di "ragazzini".

  • Life & People

    De Laurentis: “I want to bring Italian cinema to American universities and S.S.C. Napoli in New York”

    We spoke calmly to Aurelio De Laurentis on the morning after the NIAF Convention. Away from the spotlight, we met in the crowded hall of the Washington Hilton, while soft music, strictly Italian, created the background to our conversation.
     
     
    What are your feelings about last night's Italian-American evening?

    “The great American organization is the first thing that struck me. As usual, when it acts, it acts big. Everything is planned ahead and prepared, and we are just like soldiers following a path. It is studied and precise.
     
    To be recognized by NIAF fills me with interest and joy. I felt a great deal of friendship between Italy and America. Important factors are at play, today, that unite the American and European continents.

    And, within Europe, Italy has a privilege in the fields of fashion, cars, food, and art. I don't believe there is anyone who can keep up to our country.

    I feel sorry, though, that in Italy we get lost in destructive games, maybe because we are incurable diseased who only think about destroying each other with envy on their own territory. They don't understand that the American germ gave this huge push towards mutual respect. The prize is give to whoever moves the American economy and there exists a so-called American dream. A new-comer from any country of the world doesn't get excluded because of being a foreigner. He receives help in expressing his own personality and intelligence. That is how the American dream comes true.”

     

    And what can cinema do?

    “We have to bet on two realities, at some point, localizing the most by reinforcing the Italian language and the dialects, while at the same time producing films that represent Italy in the English language. Through the taste that doesn't anyway get hidden by a linguistic factor. When Milos Forman came to America and presented his One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nesthe won nine Oscars without betraying the cultural identity he was formed in.”
     
    Is there still need to update the Italian image abroad?
     
    “A penetrating action needs to happen toward young people. I see with great pleasure that studying Italian has become a fashion. But we should bring Italians to American universities, like Giorgio Armani, Montezemolo, the great musicians. We Italians think of our music as provincial, but music is music, it is universal, it has no linguistic barrier.”
     
    Any more details about how you would approach the universities?

    I think that a distribution network could be set up. I always felt the great importance of distributing a product.
     
    Universities are catchment areas that represent the country's voice and, more specifically, are the novelty of a very young population usually distant from political conditioning and any other type of dominating position. Every kid brings his own small experience.

    So I would like to create a presentation network for Italian cinema. I would like to create a network of five hundred universities and, when a film is released in Italy, broadcast the press conference in American universities. Present the author, the actor, the director and then screen the film in the universities, with a $10 admission. The school would keep 50%, while the other 50% would go to the Italian producers.”

     
    Are you already working on this or is it only an idea?

    “I can launch the idea, supervize it, since I am well accustomed to the world of distribution. I saw it with S.S.C. Napoli, and no other sports club builds and plans like we do. We invented 452 products, from motorcycles, to bicycles, to toys for children, and we distribute them ourselves, as well.
     
    I run eighteen companies, and soccer distracted me. But I think that the cinematic school of a country like Italy is a great one and should still be promoted around the world. I have resisted for thirty-six years, my company is called “Filmauro” but I don't even let it near to an adjective like “International” that is usual added when you found a company that is already doomed. Mine never failed, it remains there indestructible. I produced over one hundred films, oversaw the distribution and purchase of over four hundred, and we still move on. I don't know how long we will be able to continue doing this in Italy, and I am beginning to get bored, as well.
     
    After all, before S.S.C. Napoli I was working in the States with Gwyneth Paltrow, Jude Law and Angelina Jolie, but S.S.C. Napoli is like an aircraft carrier. Like ten films at the same time. And now I'm interested and I enjoy bringing soccer to the United States. But I also want to return with my great passion for cinema.”
     
    And when will you bring S.S.C. Napoli?
     
    “Next year S.S.C. Napoli will come to New York. We have to battle with calendars, that leave no free time. But for a long time I've had the idea of bringing the team to Giant Stadium...”

  • Baronessa Zerilli-Marimò, Professor Stefano Albertini (standing), Cardinal Renato Martino
    Life & People

    NYU’s Casa Italiana Turns Twenty

    Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò. That is its name. It was born twenty years ago in November. Today it is one of the most important cultural and academic centers in the United States. And every day, inside its walls, it pulsates with culture and continues to grow and expand. This year dozens of Italian, American, and Italian-American students  as well as students from all over the world  have visited it and experienced this firsthand. It has hosted countless guests from the fields of culture, academics, art, and politics, all with one thing in common: Italy.

    All of this has been possible thanks, above all, to the foresight and generous donation from Baronessa Zerilli-Marimò who chose, purchased, and founded Casa Italiana in memory of her husband, Barone Guido Zerilli-Marimò, diplomat and entrepreneur in the pharmaceutical industry who wanted to do something for Italy in New York. Casa Italiana’s continued success is also thanks to the work of its initial directors Professor Ballerini and James Ziskin, and current director Professor Stefano Albertini, in addition to the supportive relationship with the New York University which has developed over the years.

    To celebrate its twentieth birthday – we like to imagine it as a young adult with a long future ahead – Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò was honored last Thursday with a series of distinguished and remarkable events. Those guests who were lucky enough to be invited spent a delightful evening in familiar, friendly, yet elegant surroundings.

    Many friends of Casa Italiana spoke, including students, alumni, teachers, admirers, and regular visitors to the place that for twenty years has presented the best of Italian culture in the heart of New York City.

    Also present were important figures from academia and the art world. As for Italian institutions in Washington, Italian Ambassador Terzi was accompanied by Renato Miracco. From New York, Ambassador Cesare Maria Ragagline, Permanent Representative of Italy to the UN and Consul General Francesco Maria Talò attended along with the director of the Italian Cultural Institute in New York, Riccardo Viale, Director of the Italian Trade Commission Aniello Musella, and Honorary Consul Stefano Acunto. There were also many famous guests from Italy, including Cardinal Renato Martino, who blessed Casa Italiana with a heartfelt speech at the gala dinner.
     

    The celebrations took place in two venues. In NYU’s Skirball auditorium a short film on the history of Casa Italiana was screened and guests enjoyed a benefit concert featuring soprano Maija Kovalevska and Maestro Marco Armiliato conducting the NYU Symphony Orchestra.
     

    The moving film, produced by i-Itay.org, presented the history of Casa Italiana and was told in first person, narrated by Isabella Rossellini. Following the film, the party continued late into the evening in a beautiful dining room on the tenth floor of the building, where an extraordinary gala dinner was served.

    The twenty year-old Casa Italiana could not have wished for a more vibrant atmosphere. In the words of the speakers and on the faces of those who attended, both stakeholders and guests alike, there emanated a profound sense of satisfaction. They were commemorating something tangible and visible – an ongoing, daily mission that has made the institution a cultural center and a veritable meeting place for the Italian, American, and Italian-American communities, and beyond.

    There were several touching moments for everyone, both during the film screening (especially the Baronessa’s memorable words) and the various speakers’ remarks.

    On behalf of NYU, President John Sexton honored Baronessa Zerilli-Marimò, NYU trustee and founder of Casa Italiana, with a University Medal. Also honored with the Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò Medals were NYU trustees Maria Bartiromo and Kenneth Langone. The evening’s speeches were also charged with emotion. Casa Italiana’s director, Professor Stefano Albertini, set the tone for the party with his opening remarks and sincere thanks.

    The Baronessa then introduced Casa Italiana’s honored guests, Maria Bartiromo and Kenneth Langone. Of the latter, she jokingly said that he is a real Santa Claus for NYU. And there is no description that is more apt for Kenneth Langone, son of a plumber and a cafeteria worker who went on to become co-founder of Home Depot. Known for his extensive philanthropy, Langone expressed his strong ties to NYU, and gratitude for his Italian-American heritage and sense of belonging.

    Also present were many members of the Zerilli-Marimò family who traveled to New York to be with the Baronessa on this important occasion. They came to honor their mother, sister, grandmother, and friend who has helped to make New York more Italian.

    Noted journalist and alumna Maria Bartiromo said that she has always been proud of her Italian-American roots. In 1995 she was the first journalist to report live from the New York Stock Exchange, and today she works for CNBC and the Wall Street Journal. In her speech, she fondly recalled her ancestors who emigrated from Sorrento. “It was 1919 and they boarded a ship…,” she recounted.

    To commemorate the occasion, a limited edition book was printed, distributed, and published by Edizioni Olivares, highlighting Casa Italiana’s colorful twenty-year history. The introduction to this refined collection includes greetings and best wishes from President of the Italian Republic Giorgio Napolitano, followed by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Mayor of Milan Letizia Moratti, and Ambassador Giulio Terzi di Sant’Agata.

    We would like to echo the wish that the Baronessa makes at the end of the film saying that, “we will all come together again in ten years for the 30th anniversary and that it will continue on long after us.”

  • NYU’s Casa Italiana Turns Twenty



    Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò. That is its name. It was born twenty years ago in November. Today it is one of the most important cultural and academic centers in the United States. And every day, inside its walls, it pulsates with culture and continues to grow and expand. This year dozens of Italian, American, and Italian-American students as well as students from all over the world have visited it and experienced this firsthand. It has hosted countless guests from the fields of culture, academics, art, and politics, all with one thing in common: Italy.
     
    All of this has been possible thanks, above all, to the foresight and generous donation from Baronessa Zerilli-Marimò who chose, purchased, and founded Casa Italiana in memory of her husband, Barone Guido Zerilli-Marimò, diplomat and entrepreneur in the pharmaceutical industry who wanted to do something for Italy in New York. Casa Italiana’s continued success is also thanks to the work of its initial directors Professor Ballerini and James Ziskin, and current director Professor Stefano Albertini, in addition to the supportive relationship with the New York University which has developed over the years.
     
    To celebrate its twentieth birthday – we like to imagine it as a young adult with a long future ahead – Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò was honored last Thursday with a series of distinguished and remarkable events. Those guests who were lucky enough to be invited spent a delightful evening in familiar, friendly, yet elegant surroundings.
     
    Many friends of Casa Italiana spoke, including students, alumni, teachers, admirers, and regular visitors to the place that for twenty years has presented the best of Italian culture in the heart of New York City.
     
    Also present were important figures from academia and the art world. As for Italian institutions in Washington, Italian Ambassador Terzi was accompanied by Renato Miracco. From New York, Ambassador Cesare Maria Ragagline, Permanent Representative of Italy to the UN and Consul General Francesco Maria Talò attended along with the director of the Italian Cultural Institute in New York, Riccardo Viale, Director of the Italian Trade Commission Aniello Musella, and Honorary Consul Stefano Acunto. There were also many famous guests from Italy, including Cardinal Renato Martino, who blessed Casa Italiana with a heartfelt speech at the gala dinner.
     
    …….
     
    The celebrations took place in two venues. In NYU’s Skirball auditorium a short film on the history of Casa Italiana was screened and guests enjoyed a benefit concert featuring soprano Maija Kovalevska and Maestro Marco Armiliato conducting the NYU Orchestra.
    The moving film, produced by i-Itay.org, presented the history of Casa Italiana and was told in first person, narrated by Isabella Rossellini. Following the film, the party continued late into the evening in a beautiful dining room on the tenth floor of the building, where an extraordinary gala dinner was served.

    The twenty year-old Casa Italiana could not have wished for a more vibrant atmosphere. In the words of the speakers and on the faces of those who attended, both stakeholders and guests alike, there emanated a profound sense of satisfaction. They were commemorating something tangible and visible – an ongoing, daily mission that has made the institution a cultural center and a veritable meeting place for the Italian, American, and Italian-American communities, and beyond.
     
    There were several touching moments for everyone, both during the film screening (especially the Baronessa’s memorable words) and the various speakers’ remarks.
     
    On behalf of NYU, President John Sexton honored Baronessa Zerilli-Marimò, NYU trustee and founder of Casa Italiana, with a University Medal. Also honored with the Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò Medals were NYU trustees Maria Bartiromo and Kenneth Langone. The evening’s speeches were also charged with emotion. Casa Italiana’s director, Professor Stefano Albertini, set the tone for the party with his opening remarks and sincere thanks.
    The Baronessa then introduced Casa Italiana’s honored guests, Maria Bartiromo and Kenneth Langone. Of the latter, she jokingly said that he is a real Santa Claus for NYU. And there is no description that is more apt for Kenneth Langone, son of a plumber and a cafeteria worker who went on to become co-founder of Home Depot. Known for his extensive philanthropy, Langone expressed his strong ties to NYU, and gratitude for his Italian-American heritage and sense of belonging.
     
    Also present were many members of the Zerilli-Marimò family who traveled to New York to be with the Baronessa on this important occasion. They came to honor their mother, sister, grandmother, and friend who has helped to make New York more Italian.
     
    Noted journalist and alumna Maria Bartiromo said that she has always been proud of her Italian-American roots. In 1995 she was the first journalist to report live from the New York Stock Exchange, and today she works for CNBC and the Wall Street Journal. In her speech, she fondly recalled her ancestors who emigrated from Sorrento. “It was 1919 and they boarded a ship…,” she recounted.
     
    To commemorate the occasion, a limited edition book was printed, distributed, and published by Edizioni Olivares, highlighting Casa Italiana’s colorful twenty-year history. The introduction to this refined collection includes greetings and best wishes from President of the Italian Republic Giorgio Napolitano, followed by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Mayor of Milan Letizia Moratti, and Ambassador Giulio Terzi di Sant’Agata.
     
    We would like to echo the wish that the Baronessa makes at the end of the film saying that, “we will all come together again in ten years for the 30th anniversary and that it will continue on long after us.”


Pages