header i-Italy

Articles by: Letizia Airos soria

  • Events: Reports

    Newark. A Meeting Between Italy and Portugal

     The Italian community in Newark is no longer in the shadow of New York. Up until a few months ago, the Italian Consulate of New Jersey’s capital was recognized by the Italian government only as a Vice Consulate. Today the Italian Consulate of New Jersey is making a name for itself by planning interesting and original initiatives as a result its newfound autonomy. One of these noteworthy programs is a round table discussion organized by Consul Andrea Barbaria along with his Portuguese colleague, Francisco Carlos Duarte De Azevedo, as a part of a larger program of celebrations honoring the European Union.

    We asked the young Italian diplomat about this event as well as the day’s other activities at the Consulate. Newark is an important and strategic part of the consular network within the United States, but it seems that only a few are familiar with its activities.

    How did the idea of an Italian-Portuguese round table come about?

    After the Consulate’s inauguration ceremony we solidified our relationship with the Portuguese Consul General of Newark. We soon realized that we share the same point of view on many subjects because we frequently deal with similar issues and we both belong to the same European group. We met and came up with the idea to organize a joint event. We decided that the best thing would be to approach it from an economic-commercial point of view, one of financial investment, as it would be easier to attract speakers on this topic from local agencies. We then decided to have the event twenty-four hours before the celebration dedicated to the European Union.

    Is this the first Italian-Portuguese collaboration?

    Yes. The Portuguese Consul General told me that over the course of his tenure he had never thought of doing something like this with the Italian Vice Consul because the territorial jurisdiction would have created compatibility problems. He had to avoid misunderstandings and overlap from his Portuguese colleagues since we both depended on New York. He wanted to wait for the promotion.

    We would like to give a snapshot of the current Italian community in Newark, a neighborhood with a large Portuguese presence….

    Let’s start with the Italian Consulate in Newark. We have about 16,000 people on the consular registry. This statistic includes Italians along with the many facets of the Italian- American community, most of whom are the third or fourth generation descendents of Italian immigrants.

    Certainly in terms of the number of Italian Americans, New Jersey is very strong. With a population of 8,000,000 or so, nearly more than 1,500,000 are of Italian origin.

    The Portuguese community is equally significant, but obviously less so from a historical point of view.

    The last great wave of Italian immigration occurred in the ‘50s and ‘60s. The Portuguese, on the other hand, arrived in the ‘60s and especially in the ‘70s. I would say that this phenomena is directly related to the democratic transition in Portugal, decolonization, and their gradual quest for independence.

    And now in Newark their presence is very much felt….

    There are 70,000 who are registered with Portuguese Consulate General. In some ways it can be said that the Portuguese community has taken the place of the Italian community, in the sense that that the Italians who used to live in Newark have now moved to the more residential surrounding areas.

    For the most part, the Portuguese live in the Ironbound neighborhood close to Penn Station. It was once inhabited by Italians who have since left the neighborhood, when it was still called “Old First Ward.”

    In recent years, Ironbound has seen an influx of Brazilians and other Latin Americans. Today it is characterized as a neighborhood with a strong, primarily Portuguese imprint along with various other influences.

    So the two communities are connected in several ways, but the round table discussion focuses on business relations….
    After deciding to devote part of the celebration to honor the European institution, we considered several possibilities. For example, we discussed investing in New Jersey and New Jersey investing in Italy and Portugal. We also discussed tourism a great deal....

    There was a significant American presence….
    Yes, representatives from local agencies at various levels, such as Jack Donnelly (Governor Corzine’s Deputy Chief of Economic Growth), Steven Pryor (Deputy Mayor of Newark), and Philip Alagi (Essex County Executive). There were also representatives from various Italian institutions, along with their Portuguese counterparts, such as the Italy-America Chamber of Commerce, ENIT, ICE, etc.

    They all hoped to highlight the significant Italian and Portuguese presence in New Jersey. Above all, the American speakers emphasized the anticipated incentives that will encourage investment, as well as the transportation system, the airport, the highways, the state’s proximity to Manhattan, and its large university presence.

    New Jersey is also a main center for technology….
    Yes, especially for environmental technology. We also learned that the government wants to invest in these sectors here.
     

    So it was an important discussion….
    Yes, I would also like to say that last month sen. Alfredo Mantica, on behalf of Italy, signed an agreement in Lisbon to strengthen talks with Italy, and we expect to collaborate with the diplomatic and consular networks of both countries. What can we say? This panel discussion can be seen as a small example, a corollary to this intention, and a program designed to have a larger impact on a local level.

    We would like to take this opportunity to discuss the Consulate’s current activities. It’s a very challenging time with several institutional events going on at once….
    Yes, we are planning for the celebration during a busy time. We are working on the European elections for so-called “temporary voters,” but we are also involved in the organizational structure for the referendum which is much more complicated.

    With the Consulate’s promotion, your responsibilities have increased along with its autonomy….
    Yes, and from a financial point of view as well. But we remain connected to New York and our instructions come directly from the Embassy.

    So you are planning the June 2 celebrations within this context?
    Yes. I would also like to add that we are also monitoring the fundraising activities to benefit the victims of the earthquake in Abruzzi, which is an important and sensitive undertaking. The celebrations for the national festival here are different from those in New York; we would never even think of competing with the events there. It is, first and foremost, an official celebration that commemorates the birth of the Italian Republic. Our intention is to increase participation as much as possible, especially within the Italian-American community which perhaps has not yet had an opportunity to connect with the Italian Consulate in Newark, and to clearly demonstrate the Consulate’s presence in the area.

    It’s the first national holiday since the Consulate in Newark was “promoted.”
    It has been a long process and a particularly difficult one that has finally led to the Consulate’s promotion. It will be our first June 2nd holiday as the autonomous Consulate of Newark. Another message that we want to share, along with the institution’s message, is the rediscovery of the Italian community’s history in Newark. Although the progressive movement of Italians began here, their historically significant presence sometimes seems hidden. On June 2 a series of photographs will be on display which will remind us how important our presence has been here. Sandra S. Lee collected these images for the book Italian Americans of Newark, Belleville and in October they will be on display at the Museum of Art, Casa Colombo. We hope that dipping into the past also means opening up to the future.

  • Style: Articles

    Vignelli. Simple Design for a Confortable Life

    He wore a suit with a black tunic. She was next to him, dressed in black and white with one discreet but striking jewel that offset her outfit. Last week Massimo Vignelli and Elena Valle, excited as children, received the honor of commendatore nell’ordine al merito della Repubblica Italiana from the Italian Consul General Francesco Maria Talò and from Renato Miracco, Director of the Italian Cultural Institute of New York.
     
    Those who saw them receive the honor could have possibly not known anything about them, about their life intimately linked to the history of design. But in the way they carried themselves and presented their message, one thing was clear: simplicity speaks. Their work is eloquent simplicity and pure design. 

    Their distinguished physical figures continue to stand out as they are enveloped in the environment that surrounds them. They resemble their elegant work a bit, but they are never detached from the world around them.

    Their work is the product of passion and perseverance, but also of a gaze that seeks simplicity. “One needs to know how to design everything today. From ordinary objects to cities of the future, even the most mundane, everyday objects can inspire.”

    They are designers by profession. The Vignellis have created the most important graphic images for practically every industry, from conceptualizing objects to product packaging, from interior environments to road signs. Their mission: “To make people’s lives comfortable.” They have accomplished that first and foremost by living and interacting with people.

    Moving to America in the late ‘60s, Massimo and Elena, partners in life and work, founded Vignelli Associates in 1971.  

    Among other things, they have designed the New York City subway map, logos for American Airlines, Ducati, Bloomingdale’s, Xerox, Lancia, Cinzano, Ford Motors, Benetton, the Museum of Fine Arts, the graphic image for TG2 RAI, as well as everyday objects such as armchairs that are now part of design history. They have dictated the law in the world of contemporary typography and graphic design, leaving an immediately recognizable impression on their products.

    Massimo Vignelli, with fun-loving class, after receiving the honor reminded us of an imaginary Italian commendatore or a middle-aged man with a potbelly.

    The unmistakable cross pinned to his black outfit, he announced:  “I’ll bring it to bed!” He said this during a dinner hosted by Director Renato Miracco at his home. There was a sweet smile on Elena’s lips as she removed the pin from her outfit. Can we guess? While it was perfect for her husband’s suit, the cross didn’t go well with her long, silver jewel. She will carry the cross in her heart. We’re sure of it.

  • Facts & Stories

    Newark. A Meeting Between Italy and Portugal

     The Italian community in Newark is no longer in the shadow of New York. Up until a few months ago, the Italian Consulate of New Jersey’s capital was recognized by the Italian government only as a Vice Consulate. Today the Italian Consulate of New Jersey is making a name for itself by planning interesting and original initiatives as a result its newfound autonomy. One of these noteworthy programs is a round table discussion organized by Consul Andrea Barbaria along with his Portuguese colleague, Francisco Carlos Duarte De Azevedo, as a part of a larger program of celebrations honoring the European Union.

    We asked the young Italian diplomat about this event as well as the day’s other activities at the Consulate. Newark is an important and strategic part of the consular network within the United States, but it seems that only a few are familiar with its activities.

    How did the idea of an Italian-Portuguese round table come about?

    After the Consulate’s inauguration ceremony we solidified our relationship with the Portuguese Consul General of Newark. We soon realized that we share the same point of view on many subjects because we frequently deal with similar issues and we both belong to the same European group. We met and came up with the idea to organize a joint event. We decided that the best thing would be to approach it from an economic-commercial point of view, one of financial investment, as it would be easier to attract speakers on this topic from local agencies. We then decided to have the event twenty-four hours before the celebration dedicated to the European Union.

    Is this the first Italian-Portuguese collaboration?

    Yes. The Portuguese Consul General told me that over the course of his tenure he had never thought of doing something like this with the Italian Vice Consul because the territorial jurisdiction would have created compatibility problems. He had to avoid misunderstandings and overlap from his Portuguese colleagues since we both depended on New York. He wanted to wait for the promotion.

    We would like to give a snapshot of the current Italian community in Newark, a neighborhood with a large Portuguese presence….

    Let’s start with the Italian Consulate in Newark. We have about 16,000 people on the consular registry. This statistic includes Italians along with the many facets of the Italian- American community, most of whom are the third or fourth generation descendents of Italian immigrants.

    Certainly in terms of the number of Italian Americans, New Jersey is very strong. With a population of 8,000,000 or so, nearly more than 1,500,000 are of Italian origin.

    The Portuguese community is equally significant, but obviously less so from a historical point of view.

    The last great wave of Italian immigration occurred in the ‘50s and ‘60s. The Portuguese, on the other hand, arrived in the ‘60s and especially in the ‘70s. I would say that this phenomena is directly related to the democratic transition in Portugal, decolonization, and their gradual quest for independence.

    And now in Newark their presence is very much felt….

    There are 70,000 who are registered with Portuguese Consulate General. In some ways it can be said that the Portuguese community has taken the place of the Italian community, in the sense that that the Italians who used to live in Newark have now moved to the more residential surrounding areas.

    For the most part, the Portuguese live in the Ironbound neighborhood close to Penn Station. It was once inhabited by Italians who have since left the neighborhood, when it was still called “Old First Ward.”

    In recent years, Ironbound has seen an influx of Brazilians and other Latin Americans. Today it is characterized as a neighborhood with a strong, primarily Portuguese imprint along with various other influences.

    So the two communities are connected in several ways, but the round table discussion focuses on business relations….
    After deciding to devote part of the celebration to honor the European institution, we considered several possibilities. For example, we discussed investing in New Jersey and New Jersey investing in Italy and Portugal. We also discussed tourism a great deal....

    There was a significant American presence….
    Yes, representatives from local agencies at various levels, such as Jack Donnelly (Governor Corzine’s Deputy Chief of Economic Growth), Steven Pryor (Deputy Mayor of Newark), and Philip Alagi (Essex County Executive). There were also representatives from various Italian institutions, along with their Portuguese counterparts, such as the Italy-America Chamber of Commerce, ENIT, ICE, etc.

    They all hoped to highlight the significant Italian and Portuguese presence in New Jersey. Above all, the American speakers emphasized the anticipated incentives that will encourage investment, as well as the transportation system, the airport, the highways, the state’s proximity to Manhattan, and its large university presence.

    New Jersey is also a main center for technology….
    Yes, especially for environmental technology. We also learned that the government wants to invest in these sectors here.
     

    So it was an important discussion….
    Yes, I would also like to say that last month sen. Alfredo Mantica, on behalf of Italy, signed an agreement in Lisbon to strengthen talks with Italy, and we expect to collaborate with the diplomatic and consular networks of both countries. What can we say? This panel discussion can be seen as a small example, a corollary to this intention, and a program designed to have a larger impact on a local level.

    We would like to take this opportunity to discuss the Consulate’s current activities. It’s a very challenging time with several institutional events going on at once….
    Yes, we are planning for the celebration during a busy time. We are working on the European elections for so-called “temporary voters,” but we are also involved in the organizational structure for the referendum which is much more complicated.

    With the Consulate’s promotion, your responsibilities have increased along with its autonomy….
    Yes, and from a financial point of view as well. But we remain connected to New York and our instructions come directly from the Embassy.

    So you are planning the June 2 celebrations within this context?
    Yes. I would also like to add that we are also monitoring the fundraising activities to benefit the victims of the earthquake in Abruzzi, which is an important and sensitive undertaking. The celebrations for the national festival here are different from those in New York; we would never even think of competing with the events there. It is, first and foremost, an official celebration that commemorates the birth of the Italian Republic. Our intention is to increase participation as much as possible, especially within the Italian-American community which perhaps has not yet had an opportunity to connect with the Italian Consulate in Newark, and to clearly demonstrate the Consulate’s presence in the area.

    It’s the first national holiday since the Consulate in Newark was “promoted.”
    It has been a long process and a particularly difficult one that has finally led to the Consulate’s promotion. It will be our first June 2nd holiday as the autonomous Consulate of Newark. Another message that we want to share, along with the institution’s message, is the rediscovery of the Italian community’s history in Newark. Although the progressive movement of Italians began here, their historically significant presence sometimes seems hidden. On June 2 a series of photographs will be on display which will remind us how important our presence has been here. Sandra S. Lee collected these images for the book Italian Americans of Newark, Belleville and in October they will be on display at the Museum of Art, Casa Colombo. We hope that dipping into the past also means opening up to the future.

  • New York. Energia all'Istituto Italiano di Cultura

    Ha dato una nuova impronta, fin dai primi giorni del suo mandato, a quello che è il tempio istituzionale della cultura italiana a New York, l’Istituto Italiano di Cultura. Lo ha fatto con creatività, energia, ma anche con realismo. Ha trasformato la sede di Park Avenue in un centro sempre più attivo, per concerti, presentazioni, mostre, ma anche in un luogo di incontro, cenacolo per artisti e letterati, giovani e non giovani.

    Concreto e tenace, tra consensi ma anche qualche resistenza, ha nel corso di un anno e mezzo mutato l’immagine dell’Istituto Italiano di Cultura, portando questa istituzione all’attenzione costante dei media e del pubblico americano.

    Intervistiamo il direttore dell’Istituto Italiano di Cultura, Renato Miracco, critico d'arte e storico italiano. Questa volta lo incontriamo nella grande Sala di Cipriani a Wall Street, dove partecipa personalmente ad una riunione per organizzare i festeggiamenti per la festa nazionale. In questo suo volersi occupare, spesso in prima persona, di dettagli e di organizzazione, forse uno dei segreti del successo di molte sue inziative.

    Torniamo così insieme in metropolitana all’Istituto di Park Avenue. Nel flusso della New York che lavora e che si compiace della propria frenesia, cominciamo a parlare con lui. Lo guardiamo e ci rendiamo conto che nessun'altra cornice potrebbe accompagnare meglio la sua energia.

    Gli ricordiamo la primissima intervista che gli abbiamo fatto, quando era appena arrivato…

    "Un anno e mezzo? A me sembrano 10 anni!!! E’ difficile sommare le emozioni e le esperienze che si sono stratificate e accumulate nel corso di questo periodo…”

    Ma torna subito indietro con il pensiero, ai giorni del suo arrivo.

    “Ho fotografato l’Istituto appena sono entrato. Ma proprio fotografato. In modo che potessi ricordare  dopo quello che avevo trovato. Una delle mie priorità è stata quella di aprire degli spazi e dare una dignità. Dignità che si era totalmente persa. Dignità dell’edificio sia dall’interno che all’esterno.

    Dal mettere dei lampioni, dei  fiori, dipingere la ringhiera, le pareti. Non ho potuto fare tutto quello che avrei voluto perché non ho avuto risorse finanziarie. Ma se non altro ora possiamo contare almeno su tre spazi, tre spazi e mezzo per mostre, incontri.

    Questo ci consente una rotazione. Quindi se ci sono più eventi energetici, si avvantaggiano l’un con l’altro.

    L’ultimo è la piccola galleria borghese fatta con i soldi di Giulia Ghirardi Borghese che appunto ospiterà degli eventi dedicati alla fotografia, cioè di artisti e fotografi. Quasi sicuramente l’inaugureremo con la mostra di Tina Modotti a settembre…”

    Tina Modotti? Italo-americana, così importante e ancora cosi poco conosciuta…

    “Esatto, è esattamente uno degli scopi che mi sono ripromesso. Introdurre personalità così. Il secondo degli obiettivi che mi sono posto è sicuramente quello di far avere una diversa percezione dell’Istituto Italiano di Cultura all’esterno. Deve essere visto come un posto dinamico, dove succedono le cose, molte volte anche con del glamour. Non un luogo stantio, ma un posto che dà principalmente spazio ai giovani. Questo si può fare non tradendo la tradizione.

    Ricordo che per due volte siamo andati agli eventi dell’Armony Show. Non è facile con tutta la concorrenza. La guida americana tra i luoghi più trendy accanto al Metropolitan, mette l’Istituto Italiano di Cultura. Non è da poco anche il fatto che partecipiamo a livello di sponsorizzazione ai Sunday at Met. Quando c’è una conferenza italiana di domenica al Met l’Istituto è sempre presente. Fantastico! Fantastico l’afflusso di persone diverse, non solo italiani, che sono naturalmente sempre i benvenuti. La cultura italiana va conosciuta non autoreferenzialmente solo tra italiani. Va promossa con gli americani, ed è questo il motivo per cui si parla inglese e non solo italiano negli eventi dell’Istituto.”

    Lasciamo la strada ed entriamo nella sua stanza all’Istituto. Passano diversi minuti prima di riprendere a parlare con lui, tra telefonate, appunti da leggere, richieste. Difficile trovare un angolo vuoto nel suo ufficio. Decine e decine di opuscoli, libri, stampe, quadri, oggetti testimoni di una vitalità che accumula e propone cultura.

    Ma torniamo a parlare con lui della lingua inglese, come veicolo di trasmissione culturale...

    “Solo così possiamo far conoscere agli americani una cultura diversa. Questo è uno degli obiettivi. E cosi' anche  il New York Times ci ha praticamente monitorato in tutti questi anni, dedicandoci molte volte veri e proprio trionfalistici articoli.”

    Sicuramente un momento magico per la cultura italiana a New York, in

    questi mesi è stato la mostra di Morandi al Met. “ Si è stata una grande chance, la mostra che io ho curato per il Metropolitan, insieme a Maria Cristina Bandiera. Questo anche perchè contemporaneamente poi ho avuto all’Istituto un’esposizione parallela di acquarelli e disegni fatti qui, che poi hanno girato l’America. E’ stato un evento organizzato in partecipazione con grosse associazioni culturali americane.”

    E per rendere più visibile la vostra attività ha pensato ad una collana…

    “Si una serie realizzata dall’Istituto di Cultura. Per adesso c’è solo la sezione arte, poi ci sarà, naturalmente anche la sezione letteratura. Il primo volume è stato dedicato a Melotti, il secondo è stato dedicato a Morandi, il terzo è ai giovani artisti a New York e il quarto a Torre. Le punte di diamante di una programmazione che è molto vasta”

    Ma cosa lo ha spinto a prendere un impegno cosi?

    “Perché fare una nuova linea editoriale? Volevo dare una continuità agli eventi dell’Istituto.”

    La strategia di Miracco è chiara. Collaborazioni e sinergie soprattutto con le realtà culturali americane newyorkesi.

    “E’ importante proporre l’arte contemporanea italiana di concerto con le istituzioni americane. E non è un punto di arrivo, ma di partenza. Ma per arrivare a questo occorre aver acquisito una credibilità che prima non c’era.

    Fondamentale, secondo me, è la mia filosofia di sporcarmi le mani. Per

    esempio per organizzare un evento che interessi i giovani, devi scegliere i giovani. Per fare questo devi andare a vedere, cercare, farlo direttamente. Senza delegare. E questo vale per tutto. Non puoi parlare di cultura se non la vivi quotidianamente, non vai quotidianamente nei posti giusti. Vale per l’arte come per la letteratura. Basti pensare al Pen Festival, per la prima volta noi abbiamo ospitato un evento del Pen Festival da noi.

    Questi sono dei punti di partenza per me, non di arrivo. Ma, ripeto, arrivare a questo punto di partenza non è stato facile. Per la prima volta siamo stati presenti in posti importanti. Ma non abbiamo solo partecipato come sponsor mettendo un semplice loghetto sotto un evento che fa un altro. Siamo compartecipi nella scelta e dinamica dell’evento…”

    E le istituzioni italiane presenti a NY?

    "Abbiamo un rapporto ottimo. Ottima la collaborazione con il consolato, facciamo veramente un fronte unico. E con tutti gli altri. Con l’Ice per esempio. Siamo riusciti a concordare le modalità di promozione di una regione. Per la Calabria quindi si portano quattro prodotti culinari, ma poi si mostra l’ eccellenza archeologica calabra alla Morgan Library."

    Di difficoltà ne ha superate. Quali sono ancora rimaste?

    “Le difficoltà credo siano come il parto di una donna. Si hanno prima e poi si dimenticano allorchè si sono superate e quindi si ha la gioia di averle superate. Si dimentica la fatica. Siamo veramente troppo pochi, vorrei veramente avere la possibilità di assumere anche delle persone sul posto…”

    Vorresti maggiore autonomia?

    “Si, ho un’autonomia. Ma molte volte pongono tante di quelle condizioni.

    Poi è molto difficile avere contatti con gli sponsor. Se hanno soldi preferiscono organizzare un evento da soli. Non associarsi, non dare soldi a un’istituzione. Nella mentalità italiana, un po’ meno in quella americana, c’è l’idea che è lo Stato che deve provvedere, non il privato.”

    In termini di comunicazione e di pubblicità. Pensa che si possa fare di più?

    “Si deve fare tutto. Il nostro tipo di comunicazione non arriva là dove vorremmo che arrivasse, là dove noi vorremmo che sconvolga. Molte volte facciamo delle cose talmente grandi che ci stupiamo noi stessi di averle potute fare. Ma vengono forse recepite al 30% , al 40 % dell’importanza del lavoro, perché la struttura di comunicazione è sicuramente una delle nostre deficienze. Si avvale di percorsi vecchi, come dire, io non mi arrendo mai, vado avanti, vado veramente come un carro armato. Molte volte dicono: ‘Sai Renato sarebbe bello se noi ci fermassimo tre o quattro mesi e poi vediamo che cosa si può fare". No, il cambiamento deve essere fatto nell’atto, nell’agire, non so se rendo l’idea.”

    Strumenti di comunicazione vecchi… cosa vuol dire?

    “Faccio un esempio. Il materiale cartaceo realizzato in Italia e spedito qui. 300.000 brochure di una regione per esempio. Che ne facciamo? Oggi si deve raggiungere un pubblico giovane e non giovane che si avvale di Internet, del web.

    La brochurina così dove le regioni buttano miliardi, noi le lasciamo in esposizione, ma dopo un mese le trovo sempre lì, nonostante l’afflusso di gente. Dopo un mese si toglie. Questo è solo un esempio, ma potrei continuare…”

    Come sceglie gli eventi?

    “La qualità naturalmente è fondamentale. Eventi non autoreferenziali, questa è la prima cosa e in parte ci sono riuscito. Organizzare eventi che interessino una larga parte di pubblico americano e italiano. Fare in modo che la gente si senta a proprio agio nell’istituto, parte della vita dell’Istituto.

    Un problema serio l’ho con la programmazione. Siamo in un paese dove va fatta con tre o quattro anni di anticipo, non con 10 giorni, 15 giorni. Poi spesso non possiamo contare su un budget. Il budget che io ho copre a malapena il maintenance del palazzo. E non dimentichiamo come faccio io a garantire una programmazione di 3-4 anni? Se innanzitutto non so se posso rimanere due anni o tre o quattro…”

    Ma sono di nuovo in programma eventi importantissimi. Penso

    al Futurismo.

    “Come lo faccio? E come riesco a farlo senza soldi? Adesso non so quanti soldi ho per il futurismo di quest’anno.. io comunque lo faccio.

    E’ la prima volta che l’Istituto partecipa con Yale, Briston, Cuny, Columbia University, con Momart, Metropolitan e altri. Tutti insieme per un evento sul futurismo… Abbiamo pari dignità, ospitiamo degli eventi e andiamo lì a fare conferenze.”

    So che sta preparando un grande fund raising

    “Si fund raising vero ...non con una silent auction. La gente deve mostrare il viso, se vuole veramente aiutare. Questa è per me una cosa fondamentale, si cercherà di avere un posto glamour, non una cena seduti. Non voglio sprecare soldi, né per la location, né per dar da mangiare. Si mangia a casa propria, si viene lì a bere qualcosa e a sostenere effettivamente la cultura italiana. Vorrei quindi una cosa un po’ diversa, un po’ provocatoria".

    E quando pensa di farlo? Dove?

    “A metà settembre, fine settembre. Posso dire che Fabrizio Ferri mi dà molto volentieri il suo spazio “Industrie” dove Madonna ha fatto la sua festa. E sto cercando di coinvolgere attori e attrici italiane…”

    Quindi allora diciamo che il Futurismo è la grande celebrazione nei prossimi mesi…

    “Non solo. Abbiamo il Festival della scienza per esempio… Con Vittorio Bo, il festival della scienza per l’anno galileiano. Ci saranno una serie di 'letture' fatte qui in Istituto, forse anche all’Hunter College, alla Cuny. Lo sto organizzando con la Regione Veneto."

    Sinergie, contatti, collaborazioni…

    “Altrimenti non ce la fai … altrimenti non …”

    Quando è arrivato ci raccontò, di come si sentiva quando passava davanti all’altro Istituto di Cultura spagnolo qui accanto…

    “Adesso sono contento della facciata esterna del palazzo, l’interno ancora no, ancora sbavo di invidia…”

    Ok ma i contenuti proposti sono stati importantissimi…

    “Esatto, la fila fuori all’Istituto … è una cosa nuova… La Frick Collection che ti chiede di fare insieme la mostra Guercino…. E 4000 persone hanno visto la mostra di Morandi in Istituto, ma neanche in dieci anni si erano viste…”

    E c’è ancora un evento che proprio rimpiange di non aver fatto…

    “Qualcosa di concreto sui diritti umani. Vorrei fare degli eventi che scavino nel tessuto sociale….”

    Ultima cosa. Il Premio New York. Lo ha voluto con grande forza…

    “Ho riaperto per New York una giuria internazionale, era bloccato da quasi due anni. Dà la possibilità a degli artisti italiani di venire a New York per quattro o sei mesi, due volte l’anno e poter anche frequentare dei corsi alla Columbia University. Nel frattempo ho realizzato un libro sui giovani artisti a New York. Un libro che fotografa la realtà newyorkese. Per la prima volta  c’è una mappatura dell’arte italiana in questa città Mi stupisco di come possa non essere stata mai fatta. Questo con i soldi di sponsor privati… di istituzioni private. Mi sono incaponito, perché molte volte l’arte italiana è per parrocchiette che non vogliono saper nulla dell’altra. Quindi contro le parrocchiette abbiamo un vademecum, limitato , in via di evoluzione, che è desueto nel momento stesso in cui esce, ma è una iniziale fotografia. Un primo mattoncino...”

    E la nostra intervista termina qui. Renato Miracco torna al suo computer, alle sue moltecipli email, telefonate, appuntamenti, progetti da valutare, sponsor da cercare e alla sua cultura dell’ “energia”.

                                                                           

      Video recente, realizzato da i-Italy, con Renato Miracco in occasione del concerto all'IIC del gruppo musicale Dissonanzen che ha inaugurato nella sede di Park Avenue,
    le celebrazioni del Futurismo a New York

  • Newark. Italia e Portogallo si incontrano

    Newark italiana non è più sotto la nuvola di New York. Il Consolato italiano della capitale del New Jersey, fino a qualche mese riconosciuto dal governo italiano solo come “vice consolato”, comincia a farsi notare con iniziative interessanti e originali dovute anche alla sua conquistata maggiore autonomia. Una di queste è stata senza dubbio una tavola rotonda organizzata dal Console Andrea Barbaria di concerto con il collega portoghese, Francisco Carlos Duarte De Azevedo, nell’ambito delle celebrazioni del giorno dedicato all’Unione Europea.

    Abbiamo chiesto al giovane diplomatico italiano qualcosa in più su quest’evento e, per l’occasione, ci siamo fatti raccontare un pò delle attività di questi giorni nel Consolato che dirige. Newark, nodo importante e strategico della rete consolare italiana negli USA che ancora pochi conoscono.

    Come è nata l’idea di una tavola rotonda italo-portoghese?

    “Dopo la cerimonia di elevazione del Consolato. Si sono stretti i rapporti con il Console Generale del Portogallo a Newark. Abbiamo cominciato a scambiarci opinioni, pareri su temi comuni. Questo perchè spesso affrontiamo questioni (sostituzione di “temi”) simili e facciamo riferimento al comune quadro normativo europeo. Ci siamo conosciuti ed è nata l’idea di organizzare un meeting congiunto.

    Abbiamo deciso che la cosa migliore fosse parlare soprattutto da un punto di vista ecomomico-commerciale, di investimenti. Questo soprattutto per attirare più facilmente interlocutori delle autorità locali.   E poi l’abbiamo fatto ventiquattro ore prima del giorno dedicato all’unione ueorpea… “

    E’ la prima volta che si crea una sinergia così?

    “Si. Il console generale portoghese mi ha detto che nel corso del suo mandato non aveva aveva mai pensato di farlo con il vice Consolato italiano. Soprattutto per ragioni di compentenza territoriale che fino all’elevazione a Consolato creava dei problemi di compatibilità. Doveva evitare disguidi e sovrapposizioni con i colleghi portoghesi dal momento che dipendevamo da New York. Ha voluto aspettare l’elevazione.”

    Proviamo a dare una piccola fotografia della realtà italiana a Newark-NewJersey in un contesto che vede una grande presenza portoghese…

    “Partiamo da quella italiana del consolato di Newark. Abbaimo circa 16.000 persone iscitte all’anagrafe consolare. Questo è il dato degli italiani accanto al quale c’è quello immenso ed enorme e anche molto sfaccetato degli italoamericani. Dei figli degli italiani che appartengono alla terza o quarta generazione.

    Senz’altro almeno, in termini percentuali di incidenza degli italoamericani, il New Jersey è molto forte. Su 8.000.000 circa, si dice che quasi più 1.500.000 siano di origine italiana.

    Altrettanto importante è la comunità portoghese. Meno dal punto di vista storico, parlando per così dire di quella portoghese-americana, rispetto a quella italo-ameicana.

    L’immigrazione italiana ha vissuto l’ultima grande ondata negli anni ‘50-‘60. I portoghesi invece sono arrivati dopo gli anni ‘60 e soprattutto nei  ‘70. Direi in coincidenza con i fenomeni connessi o comunque collegati alla transizone democratica del Portogallo e della decolonizzazone. Della loro progressiva conquista dell’indipendenza.”

    E ora nell’area di Newark questa presenza si sente moltissimo…
    ” Sono 70.000 registrati nel Consolato Generale portoghese. Per certi aspetti si può dire che ha la comunità portoghese ha preso il posto della comunità italiana storica. Nel senso che che gli italiani che abitavano a Newark si sono spostati in zone più residenziali, nei dintorni.

    I portoghesi per la maggior parte vivono in un quartiere detto Ironbound, vicino alla Penn Station. Una volta era abitato anche da italiani che sono andati via nello stesso periodo lasciando il famoso quartiere italiano “Old First Ward"

    In realtà Ironbound ha visto negli ultimi tempi arrivare anche brasiliani ed in genere latino-americani. Si caratterizza oggi come un quartiere con una marcata impronta portoghese e poi con innesti vari.”

    Ci sono quindi diversi legami tra le due comunità, ma nella tavola rotonda vi siete occupati soprattutto dei rapporti commerciali…

    “Dopo una parte dedicata alla celebrazione istituzionale europea, ne abbiamo analizzato diverse sfaccettature. Per esempio, abbiamo parlato degli investimenti nel New Jersey e dal New Jersey verso Italia e Portogallo. E anche molto di turismo…”

    C’era una presenza americana importante…

    “Si, rappresentanti di tutti le autorità locali a vari livelli. Tra questi Jack Donnelly Donnelly (Deputy Chief Economic Growth del governatore Corzine), Steven Pryor (vicesindaco di Newark) e Philip Alagia (Essex County Executive).

    Erano presenti anche vari rappresentanti di istitituzioni italiane con i loro omologhi portoghesei. La Camera di Commercio italo-americana, l’Enit, l’ICE…

    Tutti hanno voluto dare risalto alla presenza italiana e portoghese strategica nel New Jersey. Gli interlocutori americani hanno ricordato suprattutto la rete di trasporti. Gli incentivi previsti per attivare investimenti, l’aeroporto, le autostrade, la vicinanza con Manhattan. E poi la grande presenza universitaria”

    New Jersey, importante anche per la tecnologia…

    “Si, sopratutto per quella ambientale. Si è anche detto che il governo vuole investire in questi settori di punta cosi’”

    Dunque è stata una tavola rotonda importante…

    Si. Voglio anche dire che lo scorso mese Mantica ha firmato a Lisbona per la parte italiana un memorandum d’intesa per rafforzare consultazioni tra Italia e (E CHI?). Si prevedono colloborazioni tra le reti diplomatico-consolari. Che dire? Questa tavola rotonda può essere vista come un piccolo esempio-corollario di questa intenzione. Di un disegno più ampio con delle ricadute a livello locale.”

    Cogliamo l’occasione per parlare dell’attività corrente del Consolato. Un periodo molto impegnativo, con diversi appuntamenti istituzionali…

    “Si. Ci avviamo alle celebrazioni del 2 giugno in un contesto complesso. Stiamo lavorando sulle elezioni europee per i cosidetti elettori temporanei, ma siamo ormai già anche dentro la macchina organizzativa ben più complessa per il referendum.”

    Con l’elevazione a Consolato è aumentata la vostra responsabilità ma anche autonomia…

    “Si anche dal punto di vista finanziario. Ma rimaniamo in collegamento con New York anche su espressa istruzione dell’Ambasciata.”

    In questo contesto state organizzando i festeggiamenti del 2 giugno?

    “Si. Aggiungo che stiamo anche effettuando un monitoraggio per le attività di fund rasing per le vittime dell’Abruzzo molto importante e delicato. I festeggiamenti della festa nazionale qui sono diversi da quelli di New York. Del resto non potremmo mai lontanamente pensare di poter competere. E’ una festa prima di tutto istituzionale, il giorno ricorda la nascita della Repubblica italiana. La nostra volontà è quella di allargare quanto possibile la partecipazione anche a quella comunità italo-americana che magari non ha finora avuto modo di entrare sufficientemente in contatto con il consolato di Newark e marcare in maniera evidente la presenza del consolato sul territorio”

    E’ la prima festa nazionale del Consolato “promosso” di Newark?

    “E’ stato un processo lungo e particolarmente travagliato quello che ha portato all’elevazione a Consolato. E’ il primo 2 giugno del Consolato di Newark autonomo. Un altro messaggio che vorremo dare, accanto a quello istituzionale, è quello del recupero della memoria della Newark italiana. Anche se il trasferimento progressivo degli italiani è stato qui metabolizzato e in un certo senso la grande e storica presenza italiana a volte sembra nascosta.  Il 2 giugno verranno proiettate una serie di fotografie che ricordano quanto è stata importante la nostra presenza qui. Sono le immagini che ha raccolto Sandra S. Lee nel libro Italian Americans of Newark, Belleville e che nel mese di Ottobre saranno in mostra nel Museo d’Arte Casa Colombo. Un tuffo nel passato che significa anche un’apertura al futuro.”

  • Vignelli. Design semplice per una vita comoda

    Lui con una blusa a tunica nera. Lei, vestita in bianco e nero con un unico gioello che, discreto, sfiora l’abito. Massimo Vignelli ed Elena Valle,  emozionati come due bambini, hanno ricevuto lo scorso martedì dalle mani del console Generale Francesco Maria Talò e dal direttore dell’Istitituto Italiano di Cutura di New York, Renato Miracco, l’onoreficenza di commendatore nell’ordine al merito della Repubblica Italiana.
     

    Chi li vedeva ricevere le medaglie poteva anche non sapere di loro. Della loro vita intimamente legata alla storia del design. Ma nel loro modo di porsi, di presentarsi al pubblico l'evidente sintesi, comunicazione, il loro messaggio: semplicità che parla. Design puro.
     

    Rimangono impresse le loro figure fisiche che si distinguono, ma al tempo stesso si lasciano avvolgere dall’ambiente che le circonda. Un pò come il loro lavoro elegante, ma mai distaccato.

    Un lavoro frutto di passione e perseveranza ma anche di uno sguardo che cerca la semplicità. “Occorre saper disegnare tutto oggi. Dagli oggetti normali alla città del futuro, anche il quotidiano più banale, può ispirare”.

    Professione designer. I coniugi Vignelli hanno curato l'immagine grafica di importanti industrie, disegnato confezioni di prodotti, progettato oggetti di tutti i tipi, interni di ambienti, segnaletiche. La loro missione:  “Rendere comoda la vita delle persone''. E lo hanno fatto prima di tutto vivendo tra la gente.

     Arrivati verso la fine degli anni ’60 in America, Massimo ed Elena,  insieme nel lavoro come nella vita, hanno fondato nel 71 la Vignelli Associate.  

    Hanno tra l’altro disegnato la mappa della metropolitana di NewYork, i loghi dell’American Arlines, Ducati, Bloomingdales, Xerox, Lancia, Cinzano,  Ford, Benetton, Musem of Fine Arts, l’immagine grafica del TG2 della Rai ma anche oggetti di uso quotidiano, poltrone che ormai fanno parte della storia del Design.  Hanno dettato legge nel mondo della tipografia e grafica contemporanea dando un’impronta inconfondibile.

    Massimo Vignelli, con divertita classe, ricevendo la sua onoreficenza ha ricordato come nell’immaginario italiano la figura di commendatore sia legata ad un uomo con la pancia. 

    Appuntata sul suo abito nero l’inconfondibile croce: “Ci andrò a dormire!”. Ha detto la sera nel corso della cena offerta dal direttore Renato Miracco.  Un dolce sorriso quello della sua Elena che invece aveva staccato l’onoreficenza dal suo abito. 

    Possiamo indovinare il perchè? Perfetta sul vestito del marito la croce  non andava d’accordo con il suo lungo, ma discreto gioello in argento.  Ma l'onoreficenza la porterà nel cuore. Siamo sicuri.

    La planimetria della metropolitana di New York disegnata da Vignelli.
    In pagina alcuni momenti della premiazione (foto di Vincenzo Ruocco)
      e alcuni lavori dei coniugi Vignelli

     

  • An Afternoon Together. With Rocco Caporale

    (In italiano)

    Acquaintances, colleagues, and friends came together to reminisce and share anecdotes, thoughts, and moments from the public and private life of this intellectual who passed away last year. The event was organized by the Italian Heritage and Cultural Committee of New York (IHCC), St. John’s University, John D. Calandra Italian American Institute (CUNY) and by the Coccia Institute  (Montclair State University).

    An educator for over thirty years, Rocco Caporale was born in Santa Caterina dello Ionio in 1927.  His life was dedicated to research and sociology, and it was an intense life that many friends recalled with fondness while seeking his presence within their words. 

    Joseph Sciame of the IHCC, Mary Anne Re, Dawn Esposito, Anthony Tamburri, Jerome Krase, Sal LaGumina, Ottorino Cappelli, Fred Gardaphè, Taina Elg Caporale (Rocco’s wife of twenty-five years and Italian-Finnish actress), his daughter Caterina, Gaetano Cipolla, Mario Fratti, Angelo Gimondo, and Mario Mignone came together as friends to share their memories of a man to whom the Italian community in New York City owes a great deal.

    Academic research was not Rocco Caporale’s only interest.  Soon after he launched his academic career, or perhaps first and foremost, he had a passion: to promote and help “his” southern Italy. For this reason he created several organizations that straddled Italy and many countries all over the world and allowed him to promote cultural exchange and research.

    Under his direction, the Institute for Italian American Studies and Pontes International worked to realize cultural exchange in southern Italy and the rest of the world, as well as the International Association of the Magna Grecia and the International Committee for the Mezzogiorno.

    In addition to these activities, Rocco was also directly involved with the Italian Heritage and Cultural Committee which is primarily responsible for organizing the events that mark October as Italian Heritage Month in New York City. As a sociologist and expert in migration patterns, Rocco understood how important statistical analysis was to the Italian vote abroad, and over the past few years his research brought several problems to the forefront.

    Everyone who spoke recalled his intense, frequent, and far-sighted research focus. Salvatore LaGumina, Jerry Krase, Anthony J. Tamburri, and Fred Gardaphè all recounted his rigor as a sociologist and his intellectual forethought that inspired him to speak, for example, in uneasy terms of the necessity for an Italian American Encyclopedia.

    Krase emphasized that Rocco had defined part of his life and the life of the college, and this sentiment was repeated by the other scholars who shared their personal recollections.

     “You felt his absence when he couldn’t come…,” Krase recalled. Rocco was the only one who didn’t ask him why he was so concerned with Italian Americans.
     

    Mary Ann’s words described her memories of being one of his devoted students. After having attended one of his lectures, she decided to focus her studies on sociology. She recounted her memories as a student who was so impressed with her professor, and included the amusing anecdote in which her father, the illustrious Judge Edward Re, telephoned Rocco Caporale without ever having met him and said: “You’re the one who took Mary Ann away from law school.” 

    Ottorino Cappelli, instead, told a story based on official documents that evoked one single day in Rocco’s life. It was an extraordinary day, one in which the sociologist was called to testify at a hearing of the parliamentary commission investigating the reconstruction of post-earthquake Irpinia. Rocco had in fact conducted significant research on this topic, revealing a system of corruption and bribes which then came to be known as “Irpinia-gate.” That parliamentary hearing marked a profound moment in his life. From the documents there emerges an evident contrast between a decidedly sociological inquiry and someone who was anxious (and also perhaps fearful) because he knew both the first and last names of the guilty parties.

    In the following speech given by his daughter Caterina, who in 1980 was still very young, said: “Yes, I remember it clearly. 

     One night he called me and thattelephone call was different than the others. He never would have admitted to being scared, but I could feel that he was. It was a poignant phone call.”

    Consul General Francesco Maria Talò was also among those present. “I only saw him a few times,” he said, “but I had a way of appreciating his career, his caliber as a scholar who represents the profound capacity of our south.” And with a few words he described another characteristic of the Caporale, the intellectual and the man: “He was a scholar who only believed in data. His research was not based on opinion.

    I remember one time when we were discussing the Italian elections. Fact and figures – for him data was the basis for everything. I recently had the opportunity to understand his relationship to the earthquake in Irpinia. I read everything, and I recently learned that it would be redistributed in Italy because it could still be useful, especially with the tragic earthquake in Abruzzi.”

    Gaetano Cipolla remembered him in this way: “He was a great organizer. Enthusiastic. I remember one anecdote in particular while we were on a tour of the Magna Grecia. He made me translate the jokes of a comic into English, jokes that were off-color. It was difficult for me, but very entertaining. I had to go between dirty words in Sicilian, Italian, and Calabrese.”

    There was also another friend who joined them on this trip, Mario Fratti. The man of the theater shared many memories of Rocco, and above all he talked about how accomplished Rocco was, and how for him even the stones also had a tale to tell.

    Rocco’s wife Tania sat in the audience and listened with attentive emotions, gathering every shade of meaning in the words she heard. She spoke with a weak but firm and trained voice, and when she left the stage she thanked all of the presenters in this way: “I was very lucky to be Rocco’s wife…” Her words were a testimony to how her husband helped her to begin a career in the theater and how this was so important to him and his family. Similarly, Caterina’s words recalled several moments when her father had succeeded in instilling his sense of hope and optimism in her.

    Rocco Caporale’s presence echoed in everyone’s words and faces as they spoke. His amusing way of doing things, often detached but reassuring, came through in the memories they shared. For those who knew him, like I did, he was a great friend and a point of reference. He was a window of considerable knowledge onto the Italian and Italian-American communities. He was always ready and able to find the positive side of everything, and when this was truly not possible, he used self-deprecating humor to find the lighter side. He was a master of the southern sense of humor, and it’s his sense of humor that I miss most.

    It is difficult, for me as his friend, to end this tribute and summarize the life of someone who I will always carry with me in my memories.

    (Translated by Giulia Presia)

  • Insieme un pomeriggio. Con Rocco Caporale

    Familiari, colleghi, amici. Tutti insieme per rievocare, per raccogliere aneddoti, pensieri, momenti di vita privata e pubblica di un intellettuale scomparso un anno fa. Organizzato dall’ Italian Heritage and Cultural Committee of New York, dalla St. John’s University, dal John D. Calandra Italian American Institute (Cuny) e dal Coccia Institute (Montclair State University) si è svolto, in uno dei pomeriggi più piovosi di questa primavera, un incontro per ricordare, presso il campus a Manhattan della St. John's University, il professor Rocco Caporale, professore emerito e Chair del Department of Sociology & Anthopology presso la St. John's University.

    Docente per trent’anni, Rocco Caporale era nato a Santa Caterina dello Ionio nel 1927. Una vita dedicata alla ricerca e alla sociologia. Una esistenza intensa che gli amici hanno ricordato con affetto, cercando nelle parole la sua presenza.

    Joseph Sciame dell'Ihcc, Mary Anne Re, Dawn Esposito, Anthony Tamburri, Jerome Krase, Sal LaGumina, Ottorino Cappelli, Fred Gardaphè, la moglie di Rocco, l'attrice italo-finlandese Taina Elg Caporale con la quale era sposato da 25 anni, la figlia Caterina, Gaetano Cipolla, Mario Fratti, Angelo Gimondo e Mario Mignone. Tutte personalità ben note nella comunità. Amici per mettere insieme dei tasselli, momenti dell’esistenza e di studio di un uomo a cui la comunità italiana di New York deve molto.

    La carriera accademica non è stata l’unico interesse di Rocco Caporale. Subito dopo, e forse prima di tutto, aveva una passione: promuovere e aiutare quello che chiamava il “suo mezzoggiorno”. Per questo aveva creato organizzazioni che, a cavallo tra l’Italia e diversi Paesi nel mondo, consentivano la promozione della ricerca e scambi culturali.

    L’ Institute for Italian-American Studies e Pontes International per esempio che, sotto la sua guida, hanno lavorato intensamente per realizzare scambi culturali tra aree del sud Italia ed il resto del mondo. E ancora l'associazione internazionale Magna Grecia e l’International Committee for the Mezzogiorno.

    Tra le attività che Rocco ha promosso va ricordata anche quella presso l’ Italian Heritage and Cultural Committee, fondamentale struttura per la realizzazione delle attività del mese della cultura italiana che si svolge in Ottobre a NYC. Negli ultimi anni, ancora una volta prima di molti altri, Caporale, sociologo esperto di flussi migratori, aveva capito quanto fosse importante l’analisi dei flussi del voto degli italiani all'estero mettendone a fuoco alcuni problemi.

    Nei ricordi di tutti la sua intensa e spesso lungimirante attività di studioso. Da Salvatore LaGumina, Jerry Krase, Anthony J. Tamburri, Fred Gardaphe è stato prima di tutto raccontato il suo rigore di sociologo, di intellettuale lungimirante che lo portava a parlare per esempio in tempi non facili dell’esigenza di un Italian American Enciclopedia.

    Krase, con grande enfasi, ha definito Rocco parte della sua vita e della sua vita nel College. Il college con Rocco. In tutti gli interventi degli accademici presenti era evidente questo elemento accompagnato a ricordi spesso molto personali. Si sentiva la sua

    mancanza quando non veniva… Sempre Krase, ancora, ha ricordato che Rocco fu l’unico a non chiedergli perchè si occupava tanto degli italoamericani.

    Nelle parole di Mary Ann invece il ricordo di quando era una sua allieva. Di quando. dopo aver ascoltato una sua lezione, scelse di dedicarsi alla sociologia. Il ricordo di una studentessa inamorata del proprio professore ed il divertente aneddoto che vede suo padre, l’illustre giudice Re, fare una telefonata a Rocco Caporale senza ancora conoscerlo e dire: “Lei mi ha portato via Mary Ann dalla facoltà di legge”.

    Intenso, anche se molto diverso nel contenuto, l’intervento di Ottorino Cappelli. Un racconto basato su documenti ufficiali che rievocano una sola giornata di Rocco. Una giornata molto particolare, quella in cui il sociologo fu chiamato a tenere una audizione presso la Commissione parlamentare d'inchiesta sulla ricostruzione post-terremoto in Irpinia. Rocco aveva infatti svolto lunghissime ricerche sul tema svelando un sistema di corruzione e tangenti poi noto come “Irpinia-gate”. Quell’audizione parlamentare segnò profondamente la sua vita. Dai documenti emerge un vero terzo grado, ed un evidente contrasto tra chi aveva svolto un’indagine prettamente sociologica e chi aveva l’ansia (e forse il timore) di conoscere solo nomi e cognomi dei “colpevoli”.

    Nel suo successivo intervento la figlia Caterina, che nel

    1980 era piccola, dirà: “Sì, ricordo con limpidezza. Una notte mi chiamò e quella telefanota era diversa dalle altre. Lui non avrebbe mai ammesso di essere impaurito, ma io sentivo che lo era. E’ stata una chiamata toccante.”

    Tra i presenti anche il Console Generale Francesco Maria Talò: “L’ho visto poche volte – ha detto – ma ho avuto modo di apprezzare il suo carattere, il suo calibro di uomo di studio che rappresenta la profonda capacità intellettuale del nostro sud”. E ancora con poche parole ha descritto un’altra caratteristica dell’uomo-intellettuale Caporale: “ Era uno studioso che credeva solo nei dati. Le sue ricerche non erano basate su opinioni.

    Mi ricordo bene una volta che abbiamo parlato di elezioni italiane. 'Fact and figures'— per lui i dati erano alla base di tutto. Ho avuto occasione proprio in questi giorni di avere il suo rapporto sul terremoto in Irpinia. L’ho letto tutto e ho capito che andava rispedito in Italia perchè può ancora essere utile, specie nella tragica occorrenza del recente terremoto in Abruzzo.”

    E Gaetano Cipolla lo racconta così: “Era un grande organizzatore. Entusiasta. Mi ricordo un tour con lui in Magna Grecia. In particolare un aneddoto. Quando lui mi fece tradurre in inglese le parole di un comico che proprio non erano molto pulite. Fu difficile per me, ma divertente. Ho dovuto barcamenarmi tra dirty parole in siciliano, itaiano, calabrese…”.

    E sempre in questo viaggio c’era con lui un altro amico, Mario Fratti. Nei ricordi dell’uomo di teatro soprattutto quanto Rocco fosse preparato, di come per lui anche le pietre avessero una storia da raccontare.

    Seduta tra il pubblico ascoltava con emozione attenta la moglie di Rocco, Tania, pronta a raccogliere ogni sfumatura delle parole che ascoltava. Con una voce flebile, ma ferma ed impostata, quando è salita sul palco ha ringraziato tutti presentandosi cosi: ”Io sono stata la moglie fortunata di Rocco….”.  Nelle sue parole la testimonianza di come il marito l’abbia aiutata a ricominciare la carriera in teatro e di come sia stata importante per lui la famiglia. Simili le parole della figlia Caterina, che ha ricordato alcuni momenti del padre e l’ottimismo che riusciva ad infonderle.

    Nei loro volti, in quegli degli amici, nelle parole di tutti e nelle battute echeggiava la presenza di Rocco Caporale. Quel suo fare divertito, distaccato e spesso rassicurante. Per chi l’ha conosciuto, come me, un grande amico, un punto di riferimento. Una finestra di conoscenza sensibile della comunità italiana ed italo-americano. Era sempre disponibile e pronto a trovare il lati positivi di tutto, e quando proprio non era possible, lo si vedeva usare autoironia. Quell’umorismo del Sud di cui era maestro. Che manca tanto.
     
     

    Ed è difficile chiudere, per un’amica come me, questa cronaca ed ardua sintesi di chi lo porta nei ricordi.
     

    English Version

  • Laura. A New York per il teatro

    La incontriamo nella nostra sede per parlare del suo lavoro e di progetti. Rannicchiata, avvolta in un grande maglione, si racconta con grande semplicità.

    Occhi che studiano, che si illuminano ed adombrano in alcuni momenti. Una voce stupendamente impostata, pause di riflessione, una gestualità molto femminile ed eloquente, la fanno identificare subito. Senza ombra di dubbio: Laura è un’attrice. Ma Laura è molto di più di un’attrice per il

    panorama culturale newyorkese italiano.

    “Sono laureata in Lettere, Discipline dello Spettacolo. In Italia ho studiato e lavorato con Dario Fo e tanti altri grandi, come Peter Brook, Eugenio Barba, Peter Stein, Soleri, ecc... Ho avuto la fortuna di frequentare un’università ricca di personalità importanti.  Poi ho recitato con Mario Carotenuto, Giancarlo Cobelli, per continuare come assistente alla regia…”.

    Laura ha molto da raccontare sul suo lavoro in Italia, ricordi, aneddoti, momenti importanti legati alla storia del teatro. Ma ad un certo punto l’Italia le sta un po’ sta stretta… «Sono arrivata dodici anni fa per caso a New York  e me ne sono innamorata. Ero un po’ delusa dallo show business italiano, o comunque da quello che mi stava accadendo intorno. Così ho deciso di fare un’internship a NewYork, in un teatro per vedere come si lavorava qui. Anche perchè il teatro americano è molto diverso dal nostro, sempre molto più legato alla tradizione.

    Fu il ‘The Kitchen’ sulla 19ma ad offrirmi questa possibilità di internship. Era così diverso, si faceva un qualcosa che mi era sconosciuto. Pensavo di rimanere solo nove mesi…e invece dopo dodici anni sono ancora qui…».

    Parlare con Laura vuol dire anche capire quanto è cambiato nel corso degli anni il rapporto degli americani con la cultura italiana ed il teatro in particolare.

    «Allora qui non c’erano compagnie teatrali italiane con dei professionisti. C’erano i giullari di piazza, ma sono sempre esistiti.  Facevano soprattutto folklore, cose degnissime per carità, però non veniva rappresentato ciò che si recitava in quel momento in Italia.  

    Così ho deciso di provarci io, di usare la professionalità che avevo acquisito, ho iniziato a fare delle rappresentazioni in italiano, anche con un certo successo. E piano piano il riconoscimento è venuto».

    E Laura mette in gioco tutto il suo background italiano, recita, organizza mostre, scrive, fa regia. Ma è evidente la cosa che più ama fare è recitare.

    «Si, prima di tutto amo recitare. Da poco molto anche insegnare teatro. Mi sto dedicando molto ai bambini. Mi diverte molto. La recitazione è la mia passione. E comunque ciò che so fare meglio, che faccio da più tempo, per cui ho superato le ansie, insicurezze ecc…»

    Ma Laura sa bene che per vincere la sua sfida americana deve essere anche una piccola imprenditrice/produttrice culturale. Non può solo fare l’attrice…

    «Amo essere diretta, ma i fondi non sono tali da potersi permettere i registi quando facciamo cose nostre. Quindi dirigo anche.  Quando produco cose, prendo spettacoli già confezionati che vengono qui, a quel punto sono semplicemente una produttrice.»

    Certo i fondi sono sempre pochi per la cultura e in un momento di crisi come questo ancora di meno. Questo non vuol dire che però Laura non sia sulla strada giusta:

    «La domanda è immensa, ogni evento che organizzo è pieno di pubblico.  Molti mi dicono che bisognerebbe trovare e gestire un teatro tutto con cose italiane, come ce ne sono già di spagnoli, irlandesi, ebrei, ecc.. E io dico sempre: ‘Se qualcuno mi regala un teatro, volentieri!’».

    Il pubblico di Laura è veramente eterogeneo. C’è domanda ovunque. “Negli ultimi anni c’è un’abitudine a New York di vedere teatro non prettamente americano e in inglese. Addirittura sono nati spettacoli con i sottotitoli. Dodici anni fa non era cosi.  Tranne che per l’Opera…”.

    Solo alcuni cenni da Laura ad alcuni degli spettacoli che ha seguito, realizzato ed organizzato, tra cui ‘Accattone in jazz’ con Valerio Mastrandrea, Roberto Gatto e Danilo Rea, una sceneggiatura che verrà ripetuta alla fine di quest’anno anche con Paola Corbellesi in ‘Mamma Roma’.  «E’ difficile mettere insieme attori così, ma sto facendo i salti mortali. Poi siamo in procinto di mettere in scena un testo della Valeri che abbiamo già provato qua ‘Tosca e le altre’. Questo con Marta Mondelli che è la mia partner. Ultimamente continuo ad andare in giro con Totò…»

    Totò. Laura è diventata importante anche per l’immagine all’estero del mitico attore napoletano. Tanto amato ma ancora troppo poco conosciuto in ambiente internazionale per quello che ha rapprensentato.

    «È una cosa nata nel 2002. In quel periodo c’era una retrospettiva su Totò al Lincon Center. L’Istituto di Cultura di New York mi chiese di curare una piccola mostra, realizzata con l’archivio della famiglia De Curtis, qui a New York. Tutto questo ha aperto le porte al viaggio all’estero di Totò.

    Piano piano negli anni si è costruita questa esposizione - … dico sempre che conta cinquanta pannelli… ma invece col tempo siamo arrivati praticamente a cento -  sulla sua vita e la sua carriera.  Vi sono illustrati anche tutti i retroscena del teatro italiano di quell’epoca, con informazioni storiche, politiche.

    Accanto alla mostra propongo un piccolo spettacolino molto modesto in cui spiego la poesia e la canzone di Totò, esponendola in maniera simpatica, perché comunque è fatta per persone che dopo devono comunque avere la voglia di conoscere di più.

    Penso sempre che con uno spettacolo non si colmano le lacune. Ma l’importante è far venire il desiderio di approfondire.

    Così posso dire che il mio rapporto con la famiglia di Toto è diventato sempre più stretto, io sono diventata la rappresentante in America. Sta per uscire un libro sulla storia della malafemmina della canzone che vorremmo portare anche qui.»

    Laura, va dove la porta un’autentica passione per il teatro e la cultura italiana. Mentre parliamo con lei ci rendiamo conto di come sia difficile raccontare tutto. Abbiamo aperto molti sipari con lei e tutti necessitano approfondimenti. E lei è una piccola prima donna, del teatro e della diffusione del teatro italiano a New York.

    Potete trovare maggiori informazioni su http://www.kitheater.com/.

    Per iscrivervi alla newsletter di Laura Caparrotti mandate un email a [email protected]

  • Life & People

    Dear Letissia... Remembering John


    What happens when an Italian abroad like me meets an American who is so Italian like John Cappelli? I’ll share it with you, looking back over my memories. John passed away a few hours ago. He was recovering in a hospital upstate where he had just undergone a major operation.

     
    Yes, it was six years ago, or perhaps more, when I met John for the first time. He had just celebrated the 50th anniversary of his professional career, and I had to write about his life for America Oggi.
     
    I see him from afar, and I recognize him even if I don’t know him. Under a statue in the courtyard of the United Nations, he’s a very thin man who wears a cap low on his head. He looks around with sparkling, curious, and extraordinarily kind eyes.
     
    Besides his eyes, I notice his smile. Open, simple, and almost like a child. And it is with this child-like enthusiasm that John Cappelli immediately takes me by the hand to show me around the U.N. “His” U.N., where he had worked as a reporter for many years.
     
    As he walks through one corridor and then another, he’s lively; he tells stories and the walls seem to follow him. His words become images. 
     
    John Cappelli almost prefers to not talk about himself, but would rather discuss the world, and most of all, journalism, the journalism of a reporter who puts the facts before anything else. 
     
    He takes me to his office, on the third floor if I recall correctly. Most of all, I remember the smell of humid papers, the heaviness of the typewriter, and an enormous printer, the likes of which you won’t find anymore. And then there are so many books, newspapers, notes. It’s a mess. John didn’t really use that room anymore, but the atmosphere from years before still hung in the air. It lived there.
     
    He began his story at the very beginning. He was born in 1927 in New Jersey. His father was from Marucci in Abruzzi and his mother from historical Mulberry Street in Manhattan. He lost her when he was only six years old. He moved to Italy where he lived until 1946. He talked about himself, about the boy who spoke English, who didn’t understand Italian, but who knew the Abruzzese dialect in his head.
     
    He actively participated in the war as an anti-Fascist, many times putting his own life at risk. He delivered information to American military troops hidden in the Abruzzi Mountains. He recounts all of this in vivid detail.
     
    I imagine John as a young man in the mountains. I think of Leone Ginzburg, slain by Nazi-Fascists. As he speaks, he defines himself with pride: the last of the communists.
     
    He returned to the U.S. in 1946 with the Marine Corps, and he settled in the Bronx on Arthur Avenue. As he describes it for a few minutes, I can see what life was like in those years. In 1962, he married Nives, who was also a writer. He enlisted in the Air Force. He completed his studies in Economics and began to work as a journalist for L’Unità del Popolo which was published in the Bronx. He then became a correspondent for the daily newspaper Paese Sera di Roma, a position he held for nearly 30 years until 1984. He then worked for America Oggi, keeping his office at the United Nations.
     
    “Lettissia…,” John continues to reminisce.
     
    And at this point, John’s words become increasingly intense, more words of a journalist. The stories that he tells are alive; he seems to experience them in the present moment, even though they span decades. Political and scientific figures, heads of states, and kings unfold before me.
     
    That day I spent several hours with him. It was the first of many meetings that took place whenever he came to New York. Over the past few months I had mostly long email exchanges with him. He used the Internet with the curiosity of a fifteen-year-old and he asked me about everything: how does Facebook and Wikipedia work, what is an online community. He told me about the evolution of his book of memoirs which he had finished very recently.
     
    Lettissia… that day, so many events, names, stories. From Spain under Franco to Cuba before Castro, Che Guevava. His meeting with Kennedy. The FBI and racism in New Orleans in 1960. Martin Luter King, Jr. Alida Valli, Gina Lollobrigida, Gerard Philippe, Joe Di Maggio, and he even accompanied Amintore Fanfani, Pajetta, Ugo Pecchioli, and Giorgio Napolitano to Little Italy…
     
    He also spoke of his colleagues with pride, from RAI’s Antonello Marescalchi, to Furio Colombo, Ugo Stille, Ruggero Orlando, Oriana Fallaci, Gaetano Scardocchia, Gastone Orefice, Rodolfo Brancoli… and David Horowiz.
     
    And then he told me what his boss Fausto Coen said to him: “I like your American style of journalism: terse and not verbose.”
     
    He was the first to tell me the story of Carlo Tresca and many other Italian-Americans.
     
    I looked among my papers for the article he wrote at the time. I still haven’t found it. But I realize that I don’t need to re-read it in order to properly recall our first meeting.
     
    “Letissia… we were already friends. It truly was love at first sight,” John continued. It was because of what he referred to as “his stroke” that he had trouble pronouncing the “z” in my name. Letissia…it was so sweet.
     
    From that point on, he always called me Letissia even in written form.
     
    And from then on he wrote to me practically every day to comment on events and articles with his unfailing irony. His emails always began with “Letissia…,” and they closed with a sweet, “Your John” that I will never forget.
     
    I will miss you, John. Letissia bids farewell to the last communist.

    Yes, it was six years ago, or perhaps more, when I met John for the first time. He had just celebrated the 50th anniversary of his professional career, and I had to write about his life for America Oggi.

     

    I see him from afar, and I recognize him even if I don’t know him. Under a statue in the courtyard of the United Nations, he’s a very thin man who wears a cap low on his head. He looks around with sparkling, curious, and extraordinarily kind eyes.

     

    Besides his eyes, I notice his smile. Open, simple, and almost like a child. And it is with this child-like enthusiasm that John Cappelli immediately takes me by the hand to show me around the U.N. “His” U.N., where he had worked as a reporter for many years.

     

    As he walks through one corridor and then another, he’s lively; he tells stories and the walls seem to follow him. His words become images. 

     

    John Cappelli almost prefers to not talk about himself, but would rather discuss the world, and most of all, journalism, the journalism of a reporter who puts the facts before anything else. 

     

    He takes me to his office, on the third floor if I recall correctly. Most of all, I remember the smell of humid papers, the heaviness of the typewriter, and an enormous printer, the likes of which you won’t find anymore. And then there are so many books, newspapers, notes. It’s a mess. John didn’t really use that room anymore, but the atmosphere from years before still hung in the air. It lived there.

     

    He began his story at the very beginning. He was born in 1927 in New Jersey. His father was from Marucci in Abruzzi and his mother from historical

    Mulberry Street
    in Manhattan. He lost her when he was only six years old. He moved to Italy where he lived until 1946. He talked about himself, about the boy who spoke English, who didn’t understand Italian, but who knew the Abruzzese dialect in his head.

     

    He actively participated in the war as an anti-Fascist, many times putting his own life at risk. He delivered information to American military troops hidden in the AbruzziMountains. He recounts all of this in vivid detail.

     

    I imagine John as a young man in the mountains. I think of Leone Ginzburg, slain by Nazi-Fascists. As he speaks, he defines himself with pride: the last of the communists.

     

    He returned to the U.S. in 1946 with the Marine Corps, and he settled in the Bronx on

    Arthur Avenue
    . As he describes it for a few minutes, I can see what life was like in those years. In 1962, he married Nives, who was also a writer. He enlisted in the Air Force. He completed his studies in Economics and began to work as a journalist for L’Unità del Popolo which was published in the Bronx. He then became a correspondent for the daily newspaper Paese Sera di Roma, a position he held for nearly 30 years until 1984. He then worked for America Oggi, keeping his office at the United Nations.

     

    “Lettissia…,” John continues to reminisce.

     

    And at this point, John’s words become increasingly intense, more words of a journalist. The stories that he tells are alive; he seems to experience them in the present moment, even though they span decades. Political and scientific figures, heads of states, and kings unfold before me.

     

    That day I spent several hours with him. It was the first of many meetings that took place whenever he came to New York. Over the past few months I had mostly long email exchanges with him. He used the Internet with the curiosity of a fifteen-year-old and he asked me about everything: how does Facebook and Wikipedia work, what is an online community. He told me about the evolution of his book of memoirs which he had finished very recently.

     

    Lettissia… that day, so many events, names, stories. From Spain under Franco to Cuba before Castro, Che Guevava. His meeting with Kennedy. The FBI and racism in New Orleans in 1960. Martin Luter King, Jr. Alida Valli, Gina Lollobrigida, Gerard Philippe, Joe Di Maggio, and he even accompanied Amintore Fanfani, Pajetta, Ugo Pecchioli, and Giorgio Napolitano to Little Italy…

     

    He also spoke of his colleagues with pride, from RAI’s Antonello Marescalchi, to Furio Colombo, Ugo Stille, Ruggero Orlando, Oriana Fallaci, Gaetano Scardocchia, Gastone Orefice, Rodolfo Brancoli… and David Horowiz.

     

    And then he told me what his boss Fausto Coen said to him: “I like your American style of journalism: terse and not verbose.”

     

    He was the first to tell me the story of Carlo Tresca and many other Italian-Americans.

     

    I looked among my papers for the article he wrote at the time. I still haven’t found it. But I realize that I don’t need to re-read it in order to properly recall our first meeting.

     

    “Letissia… we were already friends. It truly was love at first sight,” John continued. It was because of what he referred to as “his stroke” that he had trouble pronouncing the “z” in my name. Letissia…it was so sweet.

     

    From that point on, he always called me Letissia even in written form.

     

    And from then on he wrote to me practically every day to comment on events and articles with his unfailing irony. His emails always began with “Letissia…,” and they closed with a sweet, “Your John” that I will never forget.

     

    I will miss you, John. Letissia bids farewell to the last communist.

     

Pages